Skip to main content

Full text of "The Massachusetts collegian [microform]"

See other formats


] 



> 






it * 






Vol. XXV. 



MASSACHUS ETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, Septe mber 15, 1914- ___ 



No. 1 



RULES GOVERNING 

COLLEGIAN COMPETITION 

Seven Positions Open to Competition- 
Three Freshman Vacancies. 



FRESHMAN CLASS 

SMALLER THAN USUAL 



Entrance Requirements and War Ac- 
count for Decrease in Number. 



NEW INTERFRATERNITY 
CONFERENCE RUSHING RULES 




The annual competition for mem- 
bership on the Coi.lkoian board will 
le governed by the tides given below. 
In the editorial department there 
are live positions open and iu the 
busiuess department there are two 
vacancies. 

Membership to the Masba< iiusk.ith 
Columsian board shall be gained as 
follows : 

1. Candidates shall be voted on 
during the first week in March by the 
members then holding office. A two 
thirds vote shall he necessary for 
election. 

2. The competition shall open at 
midnight on September 80, 1914 and 
shall end at midnight on March 1, 

BJ JtI8 ; and to become a candidate for 
lion, each competitor mu»t have 
points to his credit before the 
dose of the contest on Bhifel* 1. 

8. To be eligible to compete, a 
candidate must have handed his name 
in to Competition editor, J. A Price 
1918, before Nov. 1, 1914. 

4, Points for the competition may 
be gained as follows : Those com- 
peting for positions in the editorial 
department will receive one point for 
each seven inches of origiual copy 
accepted, one point for each ten In- 
ches of assigned reprint matter ac- 
cepted and one point for each two 
hour period spent in office work. 
Assignments will be in charge of J. 
A. Price, 1918 who will ordinarily 
make certain assignments on request. 
The reporting of assembly speeches, 
addresses, etc., is reprint work. 

I. The number of positions open 
in each class, iu the editorial depart- 
ment is, 1916-1, 1917-1,1918-2; in 
in the business department, 1917-1, 
1918-1. 

f». The board reserves the right 
to withhold election in either depart- 
ment, editorial or business, If, in its 
judgment the poor work of any 
one group of candidates justifies it. 
In such ease the competition for va- 
cancies will be in charge of the new 
board, after it has come into office on 
March 15. 

An exception to role three of the 
competition in the business depart- 
ment is also to be noted. All can- 
didates for the position of circulation 
manager must have banded in their 



The class of 1918 is entering col- 
lege this fall with a registration of 
177 men, 23 less than last year's 
Freshman class. Various reasons 
are assigned for this falling off, 
among them being the higher 
entrance requirements and the finan- 
cial stringency due to the war in 
Kurope. The list of the members 
of the class follows ; 
Addison, Miss 



Govern Shorter 



PROSPECTS FOR THE 

FOOTBALL SEASON 




Allen, Amos 
Allen, Uland C. 
Allen. Ralph K. 
Babbitt, Frank M. 
Bainhridge, Frank 
Itaker, Foster K. 
Baker, H. Raymond 
Barbour, Francis C. 
Barton, (ieorge 
Baxter, Herbert 

Btnnetl. K. S 

Wrtke. F. J. *.'.-.. 
Bolster, R..|fe N. 
Boyd, Robert L. 
Brigham. Miss 
Brown. Kobert K. 
Bruce, W. <;. 
Burtch, C S 
Cameron, W. L. 
Canlett, F. H. 
Capm, H B. 
Carlson, F. A 
Carter, Thomas K. 
Chambers, Roger 
Chapman, J. A. 
Chelfords, L I). 
Clapp, R- F. 
Clark, Stewart S. 
Clvburn, A. L. 
Comstock, C. P. 

Davenport, VV. B. 

Davis, D. S. 

Dfummond, J. L. 

Dubois, A. <i. 

Duncan, (i. J. 

Durfee, N.O 

Kde*, DO. 

Ellis, B.C. 

Kmmtrick, L. P. 

Krickson, George 

Fiber, K. S. 

Pairchild, 

Faneuf, I-. J. 

Farrar, D. II. 

Fellows, H. C. • 

Ferris, S. B. 

Fletcher, Walter 

Foley, W. A. 



Newtnnville 
Dalton 
Holyoke 
Everett 

Fairhaven 

l'aterson, N. J. 

Fairhaven 

Amherst 

Hartford, Conn. 

N. Sudbury 

Brighton 

ma. N 



Rules Adopted to 
Rushing Season. 

The Interfraterniiy conference 
adopted a constitution and by-laws 
relative to rushing, Inst spring. 
Copies of this constitution were 
printed this fall and distributed to all 
members of the class of 191 N. For 
the benefit of those who have not 
received copies of the constitution the 
bv-laws are reprinted below. 

The conference desires that these 
rules be carefully read by all fresh- 
men mid by members of all fraterni- 
ties recognized at thin institution and 
demands that they be lived up to by 
all persons concerned. Several rules 
haV« been changed from those in 
effect last fall and especial attentiou 
is drawn to them. Dates or engage- 
ments shall not be made with any 
lon 1 f ^b man for m^ thajD48toureig 



Interesting Schedule of Seven Games — 
Middlebury Game on Campus. 

This year's football schedule is 
one of the hardest that the M. A. C 
team has been up against in years. 
Despite the fact that the freshman 
eligibility rule, prevents the mem- 
bers of the class of ltt8 from par- 
ticipating in varsity football, Coach 
Brides is very optimistic concerning 
the team and its prospects. The 
present prospects for a successful 
team are very satisfactory, thirty- 
five men having reported for varsity 
football, all being in splendid con- 
dition, and almost every man thor- 
oughly familiar with Dr. Brides* 
system of coaching. Last week only 
light practice was held, but the ex- 
cellent condition of the men, cooped 
with the knowledge of Dr. 
system admits of hea;j practi 



'MMI' ' 






tons 



Worcester 

L) nn 

Newtonville 

Satrap 

Springfield 

New Bedford 

Palmer 
Bedford 
Canton 
1'ittsrield 
Andover 
Dorchester 
Salem 
Worcester 
Salem 
Holyoke 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Hnusatonlc 
Fall River 
Derry, N. H. 
I lolyoke 
Kail River 
Arlington 
Fall River 
Bolton 
W. Newton, Conn. 
I'aterson, N. )■ 
Brockton 
I'lainfield, N.J. 
Newton, Conn, 
W, Warren 
Amherst 
Peabody 
New Milford, Conn. 
Newton 
Palmer 



mj\ SlfAT. i dm k Mil MkMi WMK^nf . 

observed. Rule V speaks of the ling dummies appeared yesttfVlytMM 
wearing of tne pledge insignia. It kli a serim»e*e la etwafltti • teHa HM 

understood that, as in former yeain. Vforc the end of the we.',. 




\ 



[CootisMd M pas* <>\ 



Foster, Hamilton K. New Rochelle, N.Y. 
Foster, Roy W. Lynn 

FreJlick, A. L, Everett 

Fuller, C. B. W. Quincy 

Gtrvey, Mi» U. E. Amherst 

Gasser, T. J. Uxbridge 



this insignia h» r.ot to lie worn until 
the Monday nn, ruing after the rush- 
ing season closes when the candidate 
may wear said pin after the chapel 
exercises. 

Any <|uestion as to the interpreta- 
tion of the rules should be submitted 
to the Iuterfraternity conferenee. 
The rules follow : 

1. Rushing season for freshmen 
shall be open until the second Sunday 
in < ktober at six o'clock in t he after- 
noon. The men shall be pledged in 
chapel the Monday following the 
second Sunday. 

2. From the first pledge date, as 
above mentioned, no freshman shall 
be pledged until the first day of May. 

8. Pledged freshmen shall not be 
initiated until the opening of the 
second semester, and a freshman not 
a member of the student body at the 
beginning of the second semester 
shall not Ih> initiated Into any frater- 
nity represented in the conference. 

4. Ko invitation to membership 
in any fraternity of the conference 
shall be given to any person who has 
not matriculated as a regular student 
In the Mflssachnsetto Agricultural 
college. 

,5. The wearing of the pledge In- 
signia binds a man to Join the frater- 
nity whose insignia he first wears 



I Continued on page • I 



[CoatintMd 00 page }] 



schedule is as follows : 

Sept. 2(5— Dartmouth at Hanover, 

N. H. 
Oct. 3— Holy Cross at Worcester. 
10— Colgate at Hamilton, N. Y . 
17_Colby at Portland, Me. 
SI— Tufts at Med ford. 
$ 0¥ . 7— Middlebury on Campus 

14— Springfield Y. M. C. A. 
College at Springfield. 
The first game on the schedule— 
Dartmouth — hi one of the hardest of 
the year. Last year the team de- 
veloped a strength unexpected by 
Dartmouth, and the Hanover team 
does not exptct to be caught napping 
this year, as Dartmouth practice 
.started a week before the M. A. C. 
men came back. This game should 
be one of the best on the schedule, 
as both teams will be fairly well de- 
veloped when they meet Holy Croat, 
though defeated by M. A. C. last 
year — will prove a formidable op- 
ponent. A new coaching system is 
being developed at the Worcester 
college which will assure a more open 
game. The third game on the sched- 
ule—Colgate at Hamilton — is un- 
doubtedly a hard game, as Colgate 
decisively defeated Yale last year. 
Colby is an unknown quantity, but her 
reputation for strong teams is un- 
questioned. But the latter colleges 
are new on the M. A. C. schedule. 



[Continued on page *] 



if 



\ 



The Massachusetts Collegian,'* Tuesday, Sept. 15, 1914. 



' 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Sept. 15, 1914- 



' 




CAMPUS CHANGES 

During the summer months the 
general appearance of the campus 
was much improved bv the completion 
of new buildings and new walks, and 
by the excellent progress made in the 
construction of the alumni athletic 
field. 

French hall, which was neariug 
completion when college closed in 
.lime, is now being used by the classes 
in forestry and market gardening. 
These two departments, which have 
been in need of new quarters for some- 
time, are now enjoying the benefits of 
the addition which was made to the 
building. The ground around the 
hull has been graded and seeded, all 
of which has done much to make 
French hall one of the most beautiful 
buildings on the campus. 

Another building which in its con- 
spicuous position near the entrance 
to the campus, adds much beauty to 
the grounds, is the new brick house 
of the Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity. 
The building is not yet completed 
inside, and little grading has been 
done on the grounds thus far. W hen 
it is finished, howi-vi-r, it will be a 
fine addition to the fraternity houses 
at M. A. c It is expected to be 

ready fOf occupancy about the first 
of December, 1!U4. 

Work on the new Agricultural 
Guiding, for which an appropriation 
8 -i^ib- recently by the Massachu- 
| A . (r |^;itiue, has been com- 



BASEBALL CAPTAIN 

Arthur Johnson ifrlC of Bridge- 
port, Conn, was elected captain of 
the baseball team for the season of 
1915 following the game played with 
Wesleyau last spring at Middletown. 

Johnson was a substitute on the 
team his freshman year playing at 
third base and his sophomore year he 
played in the outfield. Last year he 
played in the outfield and was in the 



pus, is the easiest game on the sched- 
ule though the Vermont college is 
expected to turn out a much stronger 
team this year than it has in the 
paBt. Springfield is expected to 
outdo her previous consistently suc- 
cessful record, and will be a hard 
game for Massachusetts to win. 

Seven varsity letter men were lost 
by graduation but a nucleus is left 
around which a good team can be 
built. The letter men back are Capt. 




THE ERESHMAN CLASS 

[Continued from page i] 



,.gkt , if. 1 flfl»fc» ' di 1 A ' ii.'. \ e 



Caitain Johmom 



pitcher's box for several games. 
Last season saw a great improvement 
m J«snseeeVe>^sassBBe>-« well. The 



the hsffeat o»e yet constructed on tic 
M. A. {.'. wsafM, ie located in tie 
north w*"-* corner of the campas 
giounds, between Flint Laboratory 
and the Dining hall, and faces toward 
the center of the grounds. The 
foundation is now being laid and the 
construction will be pushed as rapidly 
as possible. It is hoped that this 
building, which is to have en auditor- 
ium large enough to acco .iinodatc 
over a thousand students, will be 
ready for use in time to hold the 1916 
commencement exercises. 

The athletic field, which was 
started with such a rush last spring, 
is showing the result of the great 
amount of labor put on it during the 
summer, and it- progress has been 
very encouraging. The field is nearly 
all leveled at the present time, ami 
several teams are working on it every 
day. 

Another convenience which has 
been needed for a longtime and which 
will be fully appreciated now that it 
has been provided is a sidewalk from 
the "Dog Cart." along the east eide 
of the road extending as* far as the 
corner by the new Phi Sigma Kappa 
house. 

The 19L*» class numerals were 
imbedded in the new granolithic walk 
near the stone bridge at the south 
end of the campus. The numerals 
are made of copper and present the 
neatest appearance of all numerals 
yet put in the campus walks. 



hopes of all loyal Massachusetts men 
are with "Johnny" in having a win- 
ning team next spring. 

.iJ/aond Spaulding *17 and Paul 
Latham *17 were elected to serve as 
assistant managers of bnseball during 
the coming season. Stanley M. 
Prouty li»16 was elected manager. 

1016 INDEX 

The board of Kditors of the 1916 
lull n have started work early on this 
year's Junior annual ami hope to thus 
make it one of the best ever. A 
number of innovations are hinted at 
by the editors but these are being 
kept under cover until the book is 
placed on the market. The contract 
for the printing and engraving of the 
book was placed in the Spring and 
much of the actual compiling has 
been done during the summer when 
leisure hours presented themselves. 
More will be said about the volume 
in the future but every one will be 
sure to want a copy by the time that 
the opening rush starts around the 
Christmas vacation. 



Usaatty 



FOOTBALL PROSPECTS 

[Conttnueel from page l] 

The date of Oct. 2 1 is still open on the 
schedule thru no fault of the mana- 
ger, as t lie date wai filled but can- 
celled, too late to get a substitution. 
Little need be ssld about the Tufts 
game, as the Medford boys turn out 
one of the strongest teams in New 
England. Middlebury, on the Cam- 



Melican (q. b.) Dole (c), Darling 
(h b). Schlotterbedi (t>» Jordan (e) 

Sill: — - 

following men who nave played 

football hare reported i Cnr- 
ran (t)) whose ineligibility prevented 
his playing a full season. Palmer 
(f b) a varsity regular of last year 
until prevented from playing by ill- 
ness, Johnson who is making a strong 
bid for half back and Plaisted, who 
has played both end and tackle. 
From last year's freshman team, the 
following men are out; Day (e), 
Grayson (h b ore), Higginbotham 
(e). Edwards (t), Haglestine (e) 
Dunn and Higgins. Other upper 
classmen practicing are Little (qb), 
Fuller (f b), Verbeck (t), Danforth 
(g). Williams (e) and Whorf (h b). 
The freshman squad consists of 
28 men, a good majority of whom 
are conditioned. The freshman 
schedule is a hard one this year and 
it ii absolutely necessary that men 
come out if a successful team to rep- 
resent 1918 is to be developed. 
According to the eligibility rale, no 
freshman may play on the varsisy, 
hence there is no reason why a 
strong team should not be developed 
provided the freshmen show the 
proper spirit. The freshman sched- 
ule is given below t — 
Oct. S. Williston Seminary at 
Kasthampton. 
10. Worcester Academy at 

Worcester. 
17. Holyoke High School at 

Holyoke. 
24. Conn. Literary Institute at 

Suffleld, Conn, 
81. Monson Academy at 
Monaon. 



Gifford, F. M. 
Gilbert, H. G. 
Gillette, N. W. 
Goodiidge, G- L. 
Goodwin, W. T. 
Gordon, F, G. 
G ray son, Forrest 
Haines, Foster 
Hance, Forrest 
Harwood, Ralph W. 
Hawley, R. D. 
Higgins, Leo 
Holmes, G. F. 
Holmes, R. P. 
Howard, A. M. 
Howe, G, C. 
Howes, Donald F. 
Hurmewell, P. F. 
Huntoon, D. H. 
Hurlburt, R. W. 
Ingalls, J. W. 
Irvine, R. I'. 
Jenks, Albert G. 
Johnson, U. L. 
Johnson, Sidney C. 
|ones, F. D. 
Jones, Harold K. 
Jones, L. D. 
Kennedy, C. F. 
Kirkham, P. I.. 
Knight, F. E. 
Lamphaer, N. O. 
Lacker, David 
Lawrence, L. II. 
Lawton, R. W. 
Leiper, McC. H. 
Levine, D. 
Lipshires, D. M. 
Loring, W. R. 
Lyons, Louis 
\Liginnis, John F. 
Mallorey, A. S. 
Marshall, Max S. 
Mather, William 
McKechate, Donald 
McKee, W. H. 
Messeoger, K. L 

Millard, H II. 
Minor, J. B. Jr. 
Mitchell, E. N. 

Mitchell, T. B. 

Mower, C. T. 

Newton, E. B 

Newton, G. A. 

Nor cross, G C. 

Odams, Lester N. 

O'Niell, O. M. 

Patch, L. H. 

Perry, CD. 

Petit. A. V. 

Phipps, C. R. 

Powell, J. L. 

Pratt, O. G. 

Preble, J.N. 

Randall, W. S- 

Raymond, C. R. 

Keumnnn. T. H. 

Robbins, W. W. 

Roberts, O, C. 

Robinson, W. H. 

Russell, H.L. 

St. George, R. A. 

Sampson, F. B. 

Sanborn, Dean W. 

Sawyer, Wesley 

Sawyer, William 

Sehlough, G. N. 

Scavey, Arthur 

Sliski, John 

Smith, C. T. 

Smith, Sidney S. 

Spaulding, Lewis \V 

Spencer, Arthur 

Stanton, F. P. 

Stickney, S. A. 

Stowe, R. T. 

Stowers, Clifford 
Strong, W. P. 
Sullivan, H.L. 



W. Tislmry 

Beverly 

Revere 

Melrose 

Haverhill 

Plymouth 

Milford 

Peabody 

Paterson, N. J. 

liarre 

Springfield 

Amesbury 

Ipswich 

Wakefield 

Pittsfield 

Worcester 

Asltficld 

W. Somerville 

Norwood 

Ashley Falls 

Brooklyn 

Wilmelte, III. 

Norton 

Dorchester 

Gloucester 

Worcester 

New Canaan, Conn. 

Worcester 

Milford 

Springfield 

Primfield 

Windsor, Conn. 

Hyde Park 

Falmouth 

Fall Rivej 

Hlauvelt, N. Y. 

Sheiborn 

Somerville 

Housatonic 

Rockland 



aron 
Chelsea 
Winsted, Conn. 
Great Harrington 
New Britain, Conn. 
Medford 
Needham 
Montpelier, Vt. 
Holyoke 
Durham, Conn. 
Brimrield 
Salem 
Dorchester 
Wenham 
Westfield 
Amherst 
Dorchester 
Newport, R. I. 
East Salem 
Jamaica Plain 
Belchertown 
Beverly 
New Bedford 
Hingham 
Roxbury 
Lynn 
Worcester 
E. Lynn 
Fall River 
Nantucket 
Jamaica Plain 
Berlin 
Waltham 
N. Brainlree 
Springfield 

W. Newton 

Koslindale 

Hingham 

Danvers 

Revere 

Peabody 

Scitico 

Dorchester 

South Hadley Falls 

Lawrence 



» , 







Swift, Hubbard 
Thayer, W. C; 
Thompson, Wells N. 
Thorpe, R. W. 
Tilton, A. D. 
Tu. ker, Lee H. 
Und<*rwood, A. L, 
V,m Alstyne, L. M. 

Vickers, John 

Warren, W. R. 

Weeks, R. W. 

Wilbui.L. W. 

Will-iughby, R. R 

Wolfson, L. E. 

Woodbury, R. W. 

Wooding, P. B. 

Woods, F. A. 

Woodworth, Brooks 

Worthley, H. N. 

Wright, J. L. 

Vesair, John 



Falmouth 
Hingham 
Adams 
Medford 
Wellesley 
Ware 
Stow 
Kinderhook, N. Y. 
Northampton 
Worcester 
Hyde Park 
S. Middleboro 
New Britain, Conn. 
Maiden 
Newburyport 
Yalesville, Conn. 
Groton 
Lowell 
Wakefield 
Putnam, Conn, 
lis field 



RUSHING RULES 

[Continued rrom page 



publicly, and by this be shall never 
be eligible to membership in the other 
fraternities of this conference. 

ti. Furthermore, that the mem- 
bers of the fraternitv conference 
promise aud ugree to allow no fresh- 
man registered for the first time after 
September l'.»14, to room in out fra- 
ternity houses before he is pledged. 

7. Engagements shall not be made 
with any freshman for more than 
forty-eight hours in advance. 

8. The constitution and by-laws 
shall be printed, and a copy shall be 
placed in t^e hands of every person 
who enters the college us a student. 
It shall be the duty of the secretary 
<>f the conference to see that this is 
done. 



in 



SUNDAY CHAPEL 
President Butterfield delivered the 
first sermon in chapel, Sunday. His 
subject, which was a very interesting 
aud appropriate one for the occasion, 
was on character building. His talk 
in part was: "1 wonder what the 
real aim and purpose of our life is ! 
The average man of today only looks 
ahead to a mere job. What is the 
reason for this? Is it anything 
deeper than to gain a decent living? 
Is it but an ambition to greater 
wealth? Nowadays, there is an 
increasing number of men who use 
their capacity to make m *v to make 
themselves comfortat Peace 

breeds as many evils « war. Lux- 
ury, the settling down to the life of 
ease, is the use of money chiefly for 
comfort. It is a soft-cushion idea 

of life. 

"Some men are ambitious to make 
themselves conspicuous. Sometimes 
they are not very earefal how they 
gain tills end. The love of having 
people look op to them causes them 
to employ any means. When the 
aim is simply that of being placed 
where yon can be seen, it is indeed a 
degenerate one, 

"There are men who work hard 
because they love power. Yet, if 
mere love of power does not trans- 
cend everything else, the aim hi a 
worthy one. College men aim to 
be aa useful as possible in the world, 



To do this thoy must use wealth, 
power, ambition and their whole life. 
The one underlying ambition in the 
minds of some men should be in the 
minds of all men. 

"There are four methods of living 
a life worth while. These are sum- 
med up in work, play, love and wor- 
ship. It is the only means to greater 
and better ends. Athletics help to 
make oue a better man physically. 
But the game is a passing thing ; it 
comes and goes when man is at his 
best. 

"The great aim and the interme- 
diate aim is to work to make oneself 
as useful as possible, to other people 
primarily. Play as one of the prin- 
ciple methods of making life worth 
while, is to have the freshness for 
making work keener. Love, the 
second method, takes our thoughts 
away from ourselves. We worship 
to get the highest ideas. And in the 
end, we are well paid in a larger, 
finer and nobler character. It rep- 
resents to us a perfection becana* it 
has grown out of imperfection. 

"You cannot get things by simply 
waiting for them. We must follow 
the laws. Kveryday we do things 
without any regard to the effect on 
our character. These daily things 
should lead to the uplifting of our 
character. We should do all we can 
in things nearest to us, and then 
measure •'. to see whether it makes 
us better or worse in the eye* of our 
fellowraen and God. 

'The elements of chara< tt-r are; 
a high purpose, a healthy body, a 
clear mind, ■ finn will, and a high 
ideal. One adequate purpose is to 
follow the great work of God to per- 
fect human beings. All that goes to 
make up this world is God's method 
of building up charactir. There is 
no other purpose worth while. We 
should try to discover whatOodil 
doing in building up people, and 
then follow it out. 

"Men often mistake strength for 
effectiveness, However, it is a bet- 
ter instrument for higher things to 
which we may aspire. A great many 
people do not know bow to think 
straight. A good motto for eollege 
men, at least while in college, is 
♦Think, think, think.* A strong 
man is a man who drives appetites 
and fashions with a firm will. A 
high ideal is exemplified in Borne per- 
sonality. Everyone bus a hero. 
One personality or pattern is ( hrist. 
Here the supreme personality is in 
the ideals of bis character The 
spirit is man's motive ; it dominates 
him. It is the spirit that animated 
this great teacher. 

"In work here at eollege. and in 
planning for yonr life work, think of 
that fundamental principle ; what 
good will I get out of this in the end. 
Work for the character which will 
bring you nearer the perfect man." 



FACULTY CHANGES 
During the summer the following 
resignations among the faculty and 
otlicers of the college have become 
effective : 

Baker, Miss L. If., Stenographer, 
Department of Farm Administra- 
tion. 
Brown, A. A„ Instructor in Poultry 

Husbandry. 
Kycrly, Elmer K., Associate Profes- 
sor of Bural Sociology. 
Fenton, Miss F. Ethel, Experiment 

Station. 
MeKelly, Ivan, Dairying. 
Wattles, Willurd A.. Instructor in 
Kuglish. 
Several new appointments have 
been made to take care of the new 
eourses offered this year and to fill 
the vacancies caused by recent resig- 
nations. A number of Professor 
Eyerly'i courses for the semester will 
be carried OB by President Butterfield 
ami Mr. Lund, one or two will be 
dropped from the schedule for the 
present. The new appointments are : 
Baldinger, II. B., Dairying. 
Payne, Boyal F., Instructor in 

Poultry Husbandry. 
Baud. Frank P.. Instructor in Eng- 
lish. 
Ellis, Itcnjuinin W.. Extension In- 
structor in Farm Demonstration. 
Gunness, (. I., Associate Professor 
_ o f Rural Engineering. 
Hopkins. Miss Harriet. I.. Extension 
Assistant in Home Economics. 
Howard, Miss Alice M., Experiment 
Station. 



Regan, William S., Assistant in 
Entomology. 

Whittier, Warren F., Graduate Assist- 
ant in Animal Husbandry, 

Merkle, Frederick &., Graduate 
Assistant in Agronomy. 

Thurston, A. S., Graduate Assistant 
in Floriculture. 
The following changes in title have 

been made i 

George F. Mills now Dean Emeritus. 

Kd ward M. Lewis. Dean of the col- 
lege and Professor of Languages 
and literature. 

Ralph J. Watts, Secretary of tin- 
College. 

E. L- Quaife, formerly Instructor in 
Animal Husbandry to Assistant 
ProfesBorof Animal Husbandry. 

A. II. Nehrliug, Assistant Professor 
of Floriculture to Associate Pro- 
fessor of Floriculture. 

F. H.Van Suehtelen. Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Microbiology to Asso- 
ciate Professor of Microbiology. 

E. Anderson, Assistant Professor of 

Chemistry t«> Associate Profes- 
sor of Chemistry. 
R. H. Bogue, Assistant in Chemistry 

to Instructor in Chemistry. 
B, N. Gates, Assistant Professor of 

Beekkeping to Associate Profes- 

son of Beekeeping. 
(', |{. Duncan, Instructor in Mathc- 

n.j.ties to Assistant Ptofessor of 

Mathematics. 
A. V. Ostium, Assistant Professor of 

Botany to Associate Professor of 

Botany. 
F. A. McLaughlin. Assistant in 

Botany to Instructor in Botany. 
Miss H. T. (loessinann, Assistant in 

KnglituYto Instructor iu English, . 



The Best Flannels in town at $5.00 

A FULL LINE OF STRAWS IN NEW SHAPES ANO BRAIOS 

A New Lot of French Cult Shirts in Sumner Weights and Colors 

See PELLETT '14 



School ana College photographers 




# nnaMV' « a Center St., Northampton Masa., 
LOCALLY. 5» and South HadIeyt MaM . 



Main Opfick: 

1546-1548 Broadway, 



New York City 



These Studios offer the best skilled 
artists and most complete 

equipment ohtainahle 



WE SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE 

In so far as our benefits are mutual. 

THE AMHERST GAS COMPANY 

Everything Electrioal 



'14.— Ernest 8. Clark, Jr., is 
teaching in the Af rieultural School in 
Sutton, 



When Fitting Out Tour Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarter, for Blankets, Sheets, Pillow 
£«. Comfortables, Towels, Etc. Also Denims for that corner seat. 

JACKSON & 0TJTL1B 



1 1 









*t 



1 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Sept. 15, 19*4- 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Sept. 15, 191 4- 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published every Tuesdiy evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



Managing Editor 

Assistant Editor 

Athletic Editor 

Athletic Editor 



BOAED OF EDITORS 
FRANK W. BUELL *i?. Editor in-Chief 

TYLER S. ROGERS »i6. 
HENRY H. WHITE '15, 
JAMES A. PRICE'!5. 
E. SUMNER DRAPER 'is. 
THOS.L. HARROCKS 'i6. Department Editor 
ALFRED A. GIOIOSA'in, Campus Editor 

M1LFORD R. LAWRENCE'17. 

Associate Editor 

RICHARD W. SMITH '17. Associate Editor 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 
MAURICE J. CLOUGH '15, Business Manager 
CHAS A. HUNTINGTON. JR. '16. 

Assistant Business Manager 
W RICH ARD SEA RS'ij \dvertising Man'g'r 
LESTER E. FIELDlNG'i6. Ass't Adv. Mgr. 
BIRGER R. ROSEQU1S I '17. Circulation 



the world. The best work can only 
be done when the training and prep- 
aration have been of the best. In- 
creased scholastic ability will thus 
aid the college in the opinion that 
the world at large will have of Aggie. 
There is thus an object that each 
man can have if he would further the 
good name of the college— a striving 
to reach perfection in his work at 
college, both in student activities 
and, especially, in his class room 
work. 



Subscription #1.50 per year. Single 
copies, s cents. Make all orders payable 
to Maurice J. Clough. 



Entered as •eoond-claaa matter at the Amherst 
r«t Office. 



[Not 
the SM 
'16, on 
issue. I 

Sept. 



Sept. 

Sept. 



Vol. XXV. Tuesday, Sept. 15. No. 1 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

ices for this co!umt> should be dropped tn 
;NAL(>m>eor handed to Alfred A, Gioiosa 
or before the Saturday prec»dinu each 

16 1-10 p. m., Assembly, 

Prof. Robert J. Sprague, M. 
A. C. Mass Meeting. 
17—6-4.'. P. m.,M.A.C. C. A. 
in chapel. 

23 — 1-10 p. m., Assembly, 
Pres. K. T. Fairchild, N. H. 
state college. 




THERMOS 

CARAFE 

Ice Cold Lemonade 

Cold Water 

Other styles for outdoors. 

Keeps Hoi Keeps Cold 

DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



The resignation of George K. 
Dounell from the board of editors is 
regretted by all members of the Col- 
legian. Donnell was elected to the 
paper during hits freshman year and 
during his two years of service was 
one of the most conscientious and 
enthusiastic workers. Donnell is 
now attending the Michigan Agricul- 
tural college. 



UNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

REGULAR SUNDAY SERVICE AT 7 V M. 



The remarkable progress on 
- Alumni field must come as a surprise 
^ to all nho return to college this fad. 
From the water-sodden fields, with 
bad slopes to a dry, perfectly levelled 
expanse of land is a great step. It 
is one that should cheer every M. A. 
C. man. It marks a change in 
Aggie. It i« an advance in the rela- 
tionship between the alumni and the 
undergraduates. It is the realiza- 
tion, within a year after the present 
agitation was started, of plans that 
have been .vague and in the air for 
twelve years. It shows that objects 
can be accomplished here at this 
college when once they are surely 
started and In inly managed. 



Mas*a< in sktts commences another 
year,and all her many well wishers 
are expecting the continuation of 
expansion and growing importance 
that has marked the last decade of 
her history. In order to do this a 
duty devolves upon the undergradu- 
ates that must be met with a whole- 
hearted interest. All student activi- 
ties, athletics, musical clubs, dra- 
matics and other similar organiza- 
tions must individually make prog- 
ress in order that the college as a 
whole, from the undergraduate side, 
may advance. To secure the best 
work in these organizations each one 
of the member* must do his utmost, 
and thus the sum of these Individual 
efforts will accomplish the object in 
view. In the end the name and repn- 
tion of a college depends most upon 
its alumni and the work they do in 



MASS MEETING 
Thursday night the sous of "Old 
Massachusetts" gathered once again 
around the bonfire to show the en- 
tering class some true "Aggie" spirit 
and to liBteu to speakers whose every 
word indicated great enthusiasm and 
confidence in success for the coming 
year. President liuttcrfield was the 
first speaker. He welcomed the 
students back to college, especially 
the new men, telling them what a good 
thing it was to gu through trying ex- 
periences- the first week of college 
because it all was a part of the pro- 
cess of making them "Aggie" men. 
He urged them all to enter into the 
life of the college and always be 
loyal to her interests. 

H M. Gore '13. then gave a little 
talk, appealing to the freshmen to 
cine out for their class team. He 
emphasized the fact that the fresh- 
men would someday have to make up 
the 'varsity team and that more than 
twelve candidates would have to come 
out to be of any use for this purpose. 
Coach Brides expressed great con- 
fidence in turning out a good team 
this year, saying that Dartmouth 
would have to work hard if they would 
wiu their first game withM.A.C. Both 
Captain Melican ind Manager Price 
said that this would be a hard season, 
but they were sure it would be Buch 
a good one as to put Aggie on the 
football map. 



E. RUSSELL NORTON 



SALES AGF.NT 



Davenport Miller 
Vein Coal 

Best Quality Pennsylvania Coal 



"HIT IT OUT" 

Massachusetts ! 

A PAIR OF S6.00 SHOES 

to the first member of the Var- 
sity team making a " Home 
Run " on the local 
grounds. 

E.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOEMAN 

E. E. MILLETT 

JEWELER and OPTOMETRIST 

Lenses ground while you wait 

College Jewelry 

Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and Guitar Strtn«s 

.'.Mil Kit st. MASS. 

Next to Pott Office. 



BOSTON OFFICE 

85 Water St. 



NEW YORK OFFICE 
1 Broadway 



Amherst 



CO-OP LAUNDRY 

High-Grade College Work 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Loose- Leaf Note Books and Fountain 
— Pens— 

Before buying elsewhere see our assortment of 
Pennants and Banners. 

CURRAN ft DYER, Prop*. 



Shirts, 
Collars, 
Cuffs, - 
Plain wash, 
Same, rough dry, 



10-15C 

2 I-2C 

2 I-2C 

48c per doz. 
30c per doz. 



DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, $1.50 a Suit 



h. w. beewer. f. j. Ctaoa 

Put full name and address on laundry 



Due to the resignation of S. M. 
Proutv from the Business Manager- 
ship of the Roister Doisters, J. T, 
Nicholson '16 hss been appointed 
Business and Producing Manager. 

*02 J. B. Knight is now stopping 

in Belchertown. He has been out as 
a missionary to India, and is now tn 
the government service in agricul- 
tural education in India. He is to 
give an address before the student 
hotly in Assembly late in the fall. 



"The Sap of the Soil 99 

We frequently hear farmers speak of the « sap of the soil "—a 
phrase which expresses a great deal. All cultivated plants take up 
their food in dilute solution. The sap of a tree or plant circulates 
throughout its system of trunk, branches and leaves, carrying with it 
the nourishment necessary for its upbuilding, as does the blood in ani- 
mals This sap has been absorbed from the soil through the roots of 
the plant, and is charged more or less with plant food ingredients 
which were either applied in a soluble form or were rendered soluble 
through bacterial action in the soil, or through the digestive process 
which takes place in contact with the roots of plants. Manure or com- 
mercial fertilizers enrich the sap of the soil by supplying additional 
quantities of available plant food. Bacteria, as we have seen, help to 
break down the organic forms of plant food and render them soluble 
for the sap of the soil to absorb. 

Study the Plant Food Problem. 
Can we help you 1 



BOWKER 



FERTILIZER COMPANY 

43 Chatham St., Boston 



The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

lobbers of Wrought Iron and Brass Pipe, Valves 
inil Fittinus (or Steam. \\ ater an'l <»aV Asbestos 
And Magnesia Boiler and Pipe Coverings. Pipe 
Cut to Sketch. Mill Supplies. Engineers and 
Contractors for Steam and Hot Water Heating, 
Automatic Sprinkler Systems, Boiler and Kn«.re 
Connections. Holyoke. Ma... 



I*»ei»**v^** #o«* 



BECKMAN 



** i id nip 



LOW PRICE TMLORING CO. 

SUITS MADE TO OFDEK 
Suits Cleaned. Pressed and Dyed All kinds ..I 
Repairing lor Ladies and Gentlemen nentb «««< 
mitt-grade w..i k bv first class tailov Wort 
c illedlor and delivered. Sell licVets for pressing. 

4 IUIT5 FOR Si 5° 

GEORGE KOTOWITI, Prop. 

Nasi* Block 
T-l, (Jfi W 



Main Street. Amhe»st Mass. 

On your »a> tu the row < 'nice 



FLEMING'S SHOE STORE 



Northampton 



For particular people 

THE ELMS RESTAURANT 




CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION RE- 
CEPTION TO FRESHMEN 

According to the custom of past 
years, the Christian Association gave 
a reception to the freshmen last Fri- 
ihiv evening in the Drill Hall. A 
large crowd of upper classmen and 
freshmen attended together with some 
of the faculty ami their wives. The 
hall was decorated with maroon 
hunting over the lights, Mas- 
sachusetts hanners on Hie walls, and 
palm* placed at various points of 
advantage. Instead of the usual 
scinps of paper to lie pinned on (lie 
coat lapel, iriangulai cftldi hearing 
the numerals 1918 in l>he ink and 
places foi ihe name, address and 
class were furnished In the 
absence or the usual »» Freshman 
Bibles," leafelets hearing the word* 
of the most popular M. A. C. ftonpi 
were handed to the 1918 men. 

The first part of I he evening was 
occupied in gelting acquainted. 
Kvervwhere upper elassmen mixed 
with the freshmen. The college 
orcheslra. under Ihe direction of 
leader Tower, played at intervals. 
Refreshments of lemonade and cook- 
ies were served at two tables during 
the evening Toward the latter part 
of the evening. President White of 
the association introdueed "I'rexy" 
Hutteriield, who made ft short, 
address. Later, Elgin Sheik, the 
■■nil Serv'ue Secretary, was intro- 

dttaV'd. *Vtfti 
and 



Hubbard's BasE Fertilizers 

the most economical you can use. 

BetteR CRUrb 

i s HJnfri<8J |P are the ,nevi,a,,k ' result ' 

THE ROGERS % HUBBARD COMPANY, Middletown, Conn. 

out..- am I Wnrku, riirlliuiil, <onii. 




Y* J £1 \ are supplied every year 

KurDee s deeds a irt 7 m,,r *i Ameri - 

*^*** J*^*^ »^^^^»w ^ n pi anters t han are 
the seeds of any other growers. Do you know Burpee- 
Quality "Seeds that Grow" ? If not, we would like to 
make your acquaintance. Simply send us your address 
(a postal card will do) and you will receive Burpee's 
Annual for 1914,— a bright new hook of 1 82 pages, which 
is recognized as "The Leading American Seed Catalog." 
Kindly write to-day! Address 

W. ATLEE BURPEE & CO., Burpee Buildings, Philadelphia 



F. A. 




MEN'S STORE 



USE OUR NEW CASH DISCOUNT CARD 
NO SAVE FIVE PER CENT ON 



t Quality Restaurant at Moderate 
Prices. 

TRY OUR SPECIALS 

And a la carte service. 

OYSTERS STEAKS CHOPS 
FRIED CHICKEN, ETC. 

Open 6 a. m. to 1 1 p. m. 




FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

drown by the Florlcultural Dept. 

We offer our surplus stock of cut 
flowers and plants at reasonable rates 
to students and faculty. This stock 
is grown in modern houses under 
ideal conditions. Roses, carnations, 
violets, chrysanthemums and sweet 
peas in season. 

OROWN ON THE CAMPUS 

Telephone 30© 



Kdward Towne as leader, the various 
college songs were sung. 

The success of the reception was 
due to the hard work of the commit- 
tee in charge s H. Q. Hall, refresh- 
ments ; P. K. Whitmorc, publicity ; 
.1. Hicks, Merrill. R. W. Smith, 
decorations. 

All are urged to 0OHM out to the Bret 
regular meeting of the association 
which will occur Thursday even- 
ing at C-:)0 in the chapel, with ('. P. 
Shedd of the State Committee, as 
speaker. 



Furnishings and Custom Tailoring 

WONDERFUL LINES OF STRAW HATS 

SpecialPrjces toM^^j^flen 

White Flannel Trousers to Order $4.50 



We have an opportunity for several 
young men during the summer 
to sell goods of our manu- 
facture to farmers on a 
commission basis. 
— Address — 

Barren Manufacturing Co, 

35 Wendell St., Boston, Mast. 



ATHLETIC FIELD 

The work on the new athletic 
Held advanced very rapidly during 
the summer. All the grading 
with the exception of the terraces 
on the sides of the field is completed. 
The southern half of toe field has 
been thoroughly seeded and fertilized 
and already has taken on a green 
appearance. There remains only i 
few drains to be put in on the north- 
west end of the field. These were 
not put in last spring because the 
grade was too deep at this point. 
The brook will be opened up so as 
to prevent flooding during the winter. 
The finished size of the field is 
approximately 700 feet long, §00 feet 
wide at the north and 600 feet wide 
at the south end. 

The field is a reality now. For a 
long time the realization of an ath- 



English Blue Flannel Outing Coat 

To wear with flannel tmuv r.v 



$14.00 



$14.00 




Tailor 



Haberdashery 

—Two Colleges Store- 



Hatter 



C&rp*rvter fit Morehouse, 

PRINTERS. 



No. i, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Maaa. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Sept. 15, 1914. 






THE 

Hoover & Smith Co. 

616 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 
Diamond Merchants 

Philadelphia's Official Fraternity Jeweler 

SPECIALISTS IN 

Fraternity Badges, Fobs, Novelties, 

Rings, Charms Prises Trophies 

Medals College Pins, Fobs, Seals' 

Rings, Charms.-. 



E. B. DICKINSON,D.D.S, 

DliNTAl. ROOM'S, 

Willums Block, Amherst, 

Office Hours: Q to u a. m.. i-wto ; p. m. 



"SCOTTIE" 
H. HOOPER 

Will rkaO and press mm clothes so you 

will he satisfied. It rosts no more 

and he is nearer to "Aggie." 

t IBIK At Tl< KH SNSt l-V 

Under Columbia Cafe 



COLLEGIAN COMPETION 

[Continued from page i] 



names to Business Manager M. J. 
Clough '15 before Nov. 1, 1914, in 
older to he eligible as competitors. 
Farther information and instruc- 
tion may be had from the heads of 
the several departments. 



Robert S. Bolles 1917 of Dorches- 
ter has pledged Beta Kappa Phi. 



STEAM KITTING 
GA!- KITTING. I INNING 



Telephone ^9 -< 



F. W, DANCE & CO., Plumbers 

Specialty ol Repairing — ■ — 

t.'HI'KrH WlMHiWS, Mkmokial 
Windows, [.KAC l.K.HTS, &C. 

CCW»Ofi \vr AMIIFKST. MASS. 



T 1 1 !•: TltMPMV PARLOR 

«|. .HttiiiK I i.»-l»K I! pxiiine 

Qali4i<*M *»» f » l «w. it>-«t win k l o e uM Prf** 
All wots ca •>fullv done Work called for and 
delivered. f«. ntft' nv«rini<, suits, p.ints anr> 
coats l.adirV line linen -u-l- a specialty^ 
Teams will call even da> at M AC. 

W M. I- K VIS KM N. Prop. 

Rea' Nash Bl'k *mherst Tel. No. 142-4 



Now is the lime to be planning for 

Fraternity Groups 



Have them taken at 



MISS McCLELLAN _ STUDIO 



44 Stale Street, 



Northampton, Mass 



letic field at Aggie was a vague 
thought. From a purely artistic 
standpoint, as an additional beauty 
to the campus, the new field has 
many advantages. The hollow 
meadow which it replaces was 
never very attractive. Jn its 
completed form with an attractive 
hedge around it the field will be a 
great asset to our college. The 
advantages of the new field from an 
athletic standpoint are well known to 
every Aggie man who has seen the 
college in the last 15 years. We 
have outgrown our present parade 
ground athletic field years ago. All 
Aggie men rejoice in the approach- 
ing completion of this new field. 

A detailed financial statement at 
this time is not at hand, but in brief 
the situation is as follows. Approx- 
imately $0200 has been raised. To 
date 86100 has been expended on 
grading, drainage, printed matter 
and labor outside of the contract. 
There is still £1*00 to be raised in 
order not to draw on the athletic 
appropriations. The field committee 
have no definite plans for raising 
this amount as yet, but as soon as 
the rush of college opening is over 
and an itemized financial statement 
can be obtained the matter will be 
taken up. 



to talk on the various phases of jour- 
nalism, or to give instruction in the 
art of gathering and preparing copy. 

1913 NOTES 

Welcome to our city ! 

Frederick D. Griggs, editor of the 
Chicopee Journal, 1 Gratton St.. 
Chicopee Falls. 

Lawrence A. Bevan, agricultural 
instructor. Address 3G0 Main St., 
Concord Junction. 

Frank H. Culley, master of land- 
scrpe architectuie. Harvard univer- 
sity, assistant professor landscape 
gardening, Iowa State college, Ames, 
Iowa. 

"A little stranger arrived on Aug. 
12, 1A14; weight seven pounds; 
name, Virginia Alien Samsou." 

Oscar G. Anderson, instructor in 
pomology, Purdue university, Lafay- 
ette, Ind. 

Robert Parsons, degree L. B., 
Massachusetts Institute of Technol- 
ogy, l'.IM, speiial investigator .Mass- 
achusetts state board of labor and 
industry. 



M. A. C. PRESS CLU 




The MA. 

fiiniuli— >■ 



■* 



•**■»« 



Press Club luife hear* 
rh' ik* 
fclieity 
il of 







THE YOUNG MAN'S SHOES 



Let 



Have every kink 
All leathers 

Romeo do it with 



i)i*in«. 



of fashion this 

- $3.00 to $600. 

RBPAIULXG 

Double Wear Leather. 



MK 



F*. PAGE 



My Spring and Summer Line is Now Complete 

A very nobby hue of Flannel Trousers, ('enls' Famishing*, Ktc. 
Everything the liest and cheapest. The patterns and quality are spin d-d. 
Full hress Snpplirs — C ips and (.owns for Sale or Kent. 
Full Dress Suits Tailored or for Kent. 

Dyeing, Altering, Cleaning and Pressing of Ladies' and Grata* (.artnents. 
1 give my hest personal attention 

I^AHWOVIl*^* it Amity St., AllllierMt. Tel 302-W 



WANTED 

All who play tennis to come in and inspect our stock of Tennis 
Rackets and other goods. Yes, we carry the 

Bancroft Racket 

and we recommend it to anybody wanting the best. 

Wright & Ditson and Championship 
Balls, - - - 3 for $1.00 



ENRY ADAMS CO.. Drueeists 

The BEXALL Store on the Corner 



*iudent«VT?W rcporVfor rtrrttr "news- 
papers or othei periodicals and those 
who have a desire to enter the jour- 
nalistic field. The purpose of the 
club is to obtain greater publicity for 
the college by sending out accurate 
and reliable news, not only in ath- 
letics but also in the many other 
lines ol work for which the college 
is well known. This object is at- 
tained in several ways. All college 
news from the faculty, extension de- 
partment, etc., is made known to the 
<dub. Kvery member has immediate 
access to this news and all are able 
to report to their papers promptly, 
without fear of anyone making a 
"scoop." Results of games, box 
scoies, lineups, and advance news 
arc posted on the club's bulletin 
board as soon as any member re- 
ceives them. Thus the information 
sent to the papers will all come 
from the same source and this should 
avoid inaccurate and undesirable 
news from being sent out. 

The Press club is unique among 
lie college organizations in several 
ways. The members are all working 
for the good of the college. They 
are all helping each other for when 
one member obtains information, it is 
his duty to share it with the others 
before sending it to hli papei. More- 
over the members are earning money 
for a large part of their work, for 
the papers pay for all they print. 
The social end is uot neglected, for 
occasionally speakerBwill be obtained 



ALUMNI NOTES 

There are quite a number of M. A. 
C. alumni and ex-members of various 
classes who are now in some way 
with Cornell I biive rsitv. 

. .1; (MMtiliou in the tlortcnlt'ind 
neiM.rtlnWf ll llrWilbert , '05 i» * 
professor of plant-breeding ; \t. II " 
Patch Ml is an instructor in floiicul- 
ture. Clark Thayer '18 is engaged 
in investigation work along the lines 
of plant-breeding at Cornell, .lames 
Dayton '18 took the summer school 
course there. .lack Weaver took a 
one-week course there during the 
past summer. Weaver is now mar- 
ried and is teaching in Highland. N. 
Y. Weishein cx-MG, Francis ex-' HI. 
Harriman ex-'17, and Baker ex-M7 
are now regular students at Cornell. 
DeMott, who took a special course 
at M. A. C. is also studying there. 
"Bone" Caldwell graduated from 
there last June and is now on his 
farm at By field. 

CLASS Of NINKTKKN-Koru. 

The following 1904 class letter hts 
been sent in by Secretary P. F. 
Staples, and we arc grateful to him 
for his trouble. 

Aliern, M. P., Mauhaltan, Kans. 
Associate professor of Horticulture, 
Kansas State Agricultural College. 

Bach, E. A., Ph. D., Honolulu, T. 
H. Entomologist in charge of N. S. 
station in Hawaii. 

Blake, M. A., New Biunswick, 
N. J. Horticulturist New .Jersey 
experiment station, and professor of 
horticulture in Rutgers College. 

Couden, F. D., South Bend, Wash. 
Attorney at law. 

El wood, K. K., Berkely, Cal. Ex- 
tension work in rnivcrsity of 
California. 

Fulton, E. S., North Amherst. 
Farmer. 



I 



I 



OVER 06 YEARS 1 
XPERIENCC 




The Massachus etts Collegian, Tuesday, Sept. '15," 1914. 

— CD^Tpbeasaiit 



7 



Trade Marks 

Designs 
Copyrights Ac. 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free wlieilier in 
invention Is probably pnienluMe. Coniiiiunlra. 
lionsstrictlyJontlilentlnl. HANDBOOK on PaleutS 
lent free, oldest aaency for secumiK patents. 

I' , tents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
ipecuil notice, without c harg e. In the 

Scientific American. 

A handsomely Illustrated weekly. T.anrest olr 

■■illation of any sclentlHc Journal. 1 erms. S3 a 
rear: tour months, SI. Sold by all newsdealers. 

MUNN & Co. 364 B --*"» New York 

Brand Office. fi» F St, Washington, D. C. 



Batchelder & Snyder Co. 

nihiliv IHIULTKV UKtSIKKS 
\M> l.l I I I i; HAKKKI. 



-WHOLESALE DKALBKS IN- 



Beef. Mutton. Lamb, Veal, Pork, Lard, Hams, 

Bacon, Sausages, Poultry, tiame, Butter 

Cheese, Eggs, Bean*. 

( Itfice Si St ..r-H ;?ov*7.i9. " & "3 Blaelc«rone St. 
ISj-iton lacking itouse. Ilntthton. Mass. 
Natwe Poultry Dressing Plant, Huston. 
Creameries in Vermont. 



WOOF-WOOF 

Mac. howse your tlog? 
Dan, 1 did, 

Ha — ha, 
And another puppy bit 

the dust. 



01 LAVAL 

as superior to other separa- 
tors as other separators are 
to gravity creaming*. 




OTHER SEPARATORS .SKIM cleaner 
than is possible on the average with gravitv 
creaming, and De Laval Cream Separators 
skim as much closer still than other separa- 
tors, particularly under the harder conditions 
of cool milk, running heavy cream or sepa- 
rating the milk of stripper cow*. 

OTHER SEPARATORS SAVK 1 HEIR 
cost every year, as a rule, over gravity cream- 
ing, and Lie Laval Separators aave their cost 
every year over other separator* and last from 
ten to twenty years, or on an average five 
times as long as other separators, 

WHY NOT SOLVE IT NOW IN THE 
only sure and safe way poss ble ? If you haven't 
a separator, hoy a De Laval. If you have a 
poor separator, replace it with a De Laval, 



THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR CO. 

New York Chicago San Francisco 



BAHAB'S INN 

Northampton. Massachusetts 

two necra r«o»t thi depot^ 

The hotel where there is comfort (with- 
out extravagance.) More popular 
than ever. 

Special Luncheon 12 2 P. M. 

PRIVATE DINING ROOMS 

A la Carte Service 
to It P.M. 



Gilbert, A. W., M. S M Ph. D., 

Ithaca, N. Y. Professor of plant 
breeding, Cornell University. 

Gregg, J. H., Berkely, Cal. Pro- 
fessor of landscape gardening and of 
lloriculture at University of Cali- 
fornia. 

Griffin, C. H., M D., 241 Win 
ston St., Los Angeles, Cal. 

Haskell, S B , Amherst, associate 
professor of agronomy, Mass. Agri- 
cultural college. 

Henshaw, F. F., #90 K. 4Sth St. 
Portland, Ore., U. S. ('eologieal 
Survey in charge of the north west 
section . 

Hubert, L. T , Atlanta, (Ja., presi- 
dent Atlanta Baptist college. 

Newton, H. D., Ph. D., Storrs, 
Conn., professor of chemistry. Con- 
necticut Agricultural college. 
O'Hearn, Gk K., Pitialield. 
Parker, S. B., Hanlwick. superin- 
tendent of Mixter farm. 

Peek, A. L, Corralis, Ore., pro- 
fessor of landscape gardening, 
Oregon Agricultural college. 

(Juigley, R. A., M. D., W4-fl Con- 
nuce building, Kverett, Washington. 
Baymoth, U. B., address not 
known. 

Staples, P. F., Shi'iboin. mana- 
ger of Stanox farm. 

White, II. M., Hilton, N. Y„ 
farmer. 

>09.— The class of 190U had their 
fifth year reunion at commencement 
hist J 
back 

;*cW*i W LW ' mi' 
quet in Wf*9^^B*& •ttf^r ibe 
Hall. The class cup wm awarded 
to Barlow's boy, Richard Waldo. 
Everybody had a ripping good time. 
Among those present were Bat Car- 
din from Cuba, Beef Willis from 
Tennessee and Sam Crossman who 
had just returned from Porto Rico. 
Many of those who could not come 
sent telegrams or other messages 
that were read at the banquet. The 
class is now lookiug forward to its 
tenth year reunion in 1919. 

•09. — Charles S. Putnam has been 
transferred from the Normal School 
at Honolulu to Sahaiualuna School 
on Hani. Address, Sahainaluna 
School, Sahaina, Maui, T. H. 

'10, — Lawrence Dickinson has 
been on the sick list this summer, 
but is now quite well. 

*12. — Lin, one of our past Chinese 
students and a 'varsity tennis man, 
has returned to China and is now 
with the Conservation and Lecture 
department of the Y. M. C. A., 
working in cooperation with the Bed 
Cross society. 

»j4, — Chester I'.. Wheeler is en- 
gaged in landscape work in Ipswich. 
*1 4. —Ralph Davis is engaged in 
landscape forestry along with A. W. 
Dodge 'V2, 

*"14, — Among those seen on the 
campus since the opening of college 
were W. A, Davie, Balph Davis, 
Larry Hoag, Chester Wheeler, Harry 
Brown and others. 



Btnitfi St., Brnberet 

BREAKFAST, LUNCHEON, AFTERNOON TBA. 

Dinner if arranged for. Telephone «7» 

S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Now at 13 Pleasant St. 
Oculists' Prescriptions Pi I led llroken 1 W#*«. 

Accurately Replaced. Fine Watrh Repaiiinu 
Promptly and .skilfully Done. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 



theTeachers Exchange 



Of Boston 1 20 BoyhtoH St. 

Recommends Teachers, Tutors and Schools 



An Especially Oood Commission Proposition— 

Cash lor test orders- Article WideH A<lviiiis,.i 
Cuts down axt'tnM la powtri ifaats- Address 
Eni.inbkkini. Si'i'i-i* Co.. 21& N. oth Street, 
Philadelphia, Pa. _____ 



The Jersey 

The sire is of vital importance. 

Buy a thoroughbred Jersey bull 
and grade up. Work 
towards the 400-pounds- 
of-butter cow. It costs 
no more to produce 400 
lbs. of butter with a good 
cow than 200 lbs. with 

a poor one. Let us send you 

some Jersey facts. 

AMERICAN JERSLY CATTLE CLUI 
SM W. SM St, New York 




II 



MGBKES sags 



1 1 T^yDI^*-^ 211 ^ f ° untain pen 

VI I I l_><^\iinimize your fountain pen 
I V _^*^ troubles by owning a Moore's. C It Is the 
» / _^_aie«t, soundest and most dependable penknown. 
-"-r _ Its strength lies in its very simplicity. Nothing 
flniky to get ou t of order. C You can give your- 
self no better treat than a Moore's Non-leakable. ^ 

For Sale by Dealera Everywhere 

American Fountain Pen Company 

Adami, <:uahln_ & Foster, S-lllnft Agents vs_r> 

|M DEVONSHIRE STREET - BOS1 ON. MASS. 



«\ 











Do You Raise 300 Bushels of Potatoes per Acre? 

IHREE hundred bushels per acre is 

not an unusual yield by any means, 

but did you get it this year ? 

_If you were planning to raise 300 

bushels of potatoes to the acre how 

- - far apart would you space your rows? 

How far apart would you drop the seed pieces in 

the row? 

_How much fertilizer would vou use to grow 300 

bushels of potatoes per acre? How would you 

apply it ? 

IJAre you sure that your seed potatoes are true to 

name and true to type ? 

qWhat are you doing to prevent "scab," and early 

and late blight ? 

CJDid you have a short crop of potatoes because of 

dry weather? Have you decided how you will 

overcome this trouble in the future ? 

f AH the** practical point*, did m my more, ■« hilly covered do our 

new book 

"Potatoes: A Money Crop" 

which will be i«nt tree to erery eetsto grower who requests ■ copy, and 

mention* this paper. 

OThii book is written by ■ man who himiell baa had yeara of experience as 

a potato grower, and who has made ■ careful ttady ol the beat methods of 

other grower*. 

«JH yon read this book yon will keep it lor hrtore refereaee. It it ■ worth 

while" publication, ____________—__—___--— — — 

The Coe-Mortimer Company 

51 CHAMBERS STREET, NEW YORK CITY 





•#l. 




8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Sept. 15, 1914. 



JOIN THE BUNCH AT- 

EPSTEIN'S TAILORING PARLORS 

Now Incited over post ottice. Up one (tight 

Pressing and Cleaning a Specialty 



Liberal Ticket System 



TeLj6-J 



TOEFIL MIBNTKA 

ShitfR Sliiiud iinil rolixlifil — Makes old siloes 

look like new— Neat, classy woikinanship, 
M»tu St Open Sunday. Oft *.iv W post ortice 



The Highland Hotel 

Corner of Hillmun ami Iiainus Streets, three 
blocks from the Union Depot, la a modem hos- 
telry run 011 the Kuropeaii I'l.in, It in jnit ■ step 
from Main Street, away f rota the noise and dust 
ami yet in the center of the business district. 

Its rooms Are well furnished and comfortable, 
I1.1V11114 a telephone and hot and cold running 

water in every room. Prices Si and up; n I 

with bath (single) S1.5U and up. 

Its excellent cuisine and well ventilated dining 
room makes a meal a pleasant memory— every- 
thing of the highest quality, well cooked and 
served in the best possible manner. 

Stay at the Highland Hotel once and you will 
anticipate staying there again. Mask every 
evening. 

D. H. SIEVERS, 



Highland M I. 



StpriiiKllt'liI, MitxK. 



STUDEHT FUftHI TUBE 

RUGS 

CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College TENN|S RACKETS 



Offers courses of instruction in twenty six teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 
Animal Husbandry 
Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 



Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 

Agricultural Chemistry 



Economic Entomology 

Microbiology 

Plant Physiology and Pathology 

Agricultural Education 

For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST, MASS. 



Spalding's 
Lee's Slotted Throat 
Doherty 



WRIGHT & DITSON 

Championship Balls * 

35c, 3 for $1.00 



Golf Balls 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



Joiut Committee on laterooUegJAte Athletic*, 

M. A. C. Athletic Field Association, 

The College Senate, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association. 

Hockey Association, 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



Amherst, Mass. 




AND 




CARPET ROOMS 

F. \). MARSH F.ST ATE 



COX SONS 

— AND — 

VINING 

7**74 Madison Avenue. New York 

CAPS AND GOWNS 

Best Materials and Workmanship 

WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

a; Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



1 ue teen Hundred Fifteen Index, 
Nineteen Hundred Sixteen Index. 
M, A. C. Christian Association, 
M. A. C. Catholic Club, 
Fraternity Conference, 
Htockbridge Club, 



Philip H. Smith, Secretary 

( . S. Hicks > Treasurer 

E. Towne, Presuleut 

J, A. Price, Manager 

8. Prouty, Manager 

E. F. Clark, Manager 

E. S. Draper, Mauager 
a uager 

aidant 

auager 

anager 

II . M. Rogers, Manager 

L. E. Fielding, Manager 

H. II . White, President 

.1. E. Harper, President 

F. W. Buell, President 
P. F. Whitmore, President 



Sthimikn Lank FoLflKB 

MANUFAOTUHINa JMWKI.KH 

18()liK(UI)WAY. NEW YORK 

CLUB AND COL.LK«iK 
1MN8 AND HINCife* «* 

HUM), SILVIR AND HROMZH MHPiLM 



1 here arc Seven CJood Keasonsahy you should 

buy vour 

COAL 

or 

C. R. ELDER 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



E WELL'S 



The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Mi., alongside the 
famous Bloody Brook battle ground 
to Old Ueernelrl thence to Green* 
field, Turners Falls and across the 
"Plains" to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 

50 Miles of Trackage -/lodern 
Equipment — Train Dispatch- 
ing System— Freight and Ex- 
press Service over entire line. 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
Company 




Wright dfe E>lte»ot» 

*.i'fin« Cataiouu© 
Containing Prices and Style* of 

Base Ball, Lawn Tennis, Uolf and 

(iencral Athletic Goods — IS OUT 

The Wright & Ditson Base Ball Uniforms 

are better than ever this year. Managers 

should write for samples and prices. 

Catalog-no KUKK to any addif-ae 



WWIIIHT 

344 Washington m , 



D1TMUN 

Boston, Mass. 



CARS 



Leave AOCJIE COLLEGE for HOL- 
YOKE at 45 min. past the hour. 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST for AOUIE COL- 
LI- < il-: at 7 and 37 mn. past the hour. 



Can at 



Rate* 



AIHERST & SUNDERLAND ST. RY. CO 



ICE CREAK. 



Ctoud only from 1 A. M. to 4 A. M. 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers ol 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product, 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of "Gold Medal Uniforms." 

1434-1426 Chestnut St ., Philadelphia, Pa. 



For a Daily and Sunday Newspaper 
Yon should Read 

THIS 

Springfield Republican 

While you are at college In Amherst. 

II has all of Tfca M. A, G. Krwa 

Tin- Beat S|„,rtiii(- NfW. 
Pull I. ••in- ml N«' H « 

A "".tr.uiK Bdltorlal Page 
Interesting Features 
It la a Baal Mewapapar 

Daily, 3 cents; 70 cents a month ; #2.00 
a quarter. 

Sunday, 5 cents; 50 cents a quarter. 
Subscribe by mail ot through the Amherst Ntws* 





SEP Z 11914 



•-feUlse-jM 




MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXV. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, September 22, 19 *4- 



No. 2 



RIFLE TEAM REVIEW 

AND PROSPECTS 



Bright Outlook for the Coming Season 
—Student Support Needed. 

Since a rifle team was established 
at M. A. C. in 1909, almost phe- 
nomenal success has attended it. 
During the five seasons past the 
team has won the United States 
intercollegiate indoor championship 
three times and the outdoor cham- 
pionship four times. Last year 
with a seasons average of 968.7 and 
record breaking scores of 978 and 
980, the team finished in second 
place, losing their only match to 
Michigan Aggie, who established 
phenomenal scores in intercollegiate 
indoor shooting. The outdoor rifle 
team last spring established a new 
record by scoring 827 out of a possi- 
ble 900, and finishing in first place. 
This was accomplished despite the 
fact that the team had no coach and ! 
■hot under somewhat unfavorable 
rules. The following men comprised 
the outdoor team, E. W. Dunbar *14, 
J. H. Oertel '14, B. P. Hotis '15. 
M. C. Lane *15, G. F. Hyde *15, K. 
M. Upton *lii, M. C. Lane '15 was 
elected captain for this year. 

Prospects for a successful indoor 
team are very bright for this year, 
seven of last year's team being 
left in college. However there are 
places for the new men, and anyone 
who has any ability in that line 
should follow it op, as men must be 
developed to take the places of 
th. is,- who graduate with 1915. 

The success of the team depends 
to a large extent upon the student 
body. Their financial Bupport means 
better equipment and good coaching, 
both being very important factors is 
the seasons shooting. The name of 
M.A. C. has been brought before 
the public many times because of the 
victories of her rifle team, and such a 
team deserves the continued support 
which has been given it In the past. 
The athletic association haB granted 
:m rMt to those men who make up 
the outdoor team, or who shot among 
the first five in 50 per cent of the 
indoor matches and whose average 
is 188 or better. The student body 
has not failed in their support in the 
past, and it is hoped that this year 
will prove no exception. 

It is hoped that many upperolass- 
men will come out for the indoor 



FOURTH ALUMNI ATHLETIC FIELD REPORT 

Immediate Need of One Thousand Dollars to Complete Payments is 
Felt. Grading and Seeding Completed. 



Class of 71. 

« 72. 

" 73- 

" 74- 

" 75- 

" 76. 

" 77- 

" 7»- 

" 79- 

" 80. 

" 81. 

" 8a. 

" 83 

" «4 

" 85 

" 86 

u 87 
" 88 

■ 89 
■« 90 

9' 

92 

93 
<M 
9 



it 
•« 

H 



97 •- 
08.. 

99* 



. * . . t . - 



01 . 

02 . 

03 

04 

05. 

06. 

07. 

08 

09. 

10. 

1 1 

12 

•3 

'4 



Total alumni 

Total undergraduates! 

Total alumni and undergraduates. 

Recreation field fund 

Friend* of the college 

College Signal (1913-14) 

College field fund 

Construction profit 



Memnei* 

22 
|6 

IO 

9 

«7 

'7 
8 

% 

7 
12 

27 
10 

4 
9 

12 
18 

"9 
12 

14 

16 

22 
21 

3° 

2S 

*S 

'S 

10 

«4 , 



SI 

»4 

so 

29 
26 

22 

57 

5° 
43 
42 

82 

96 

1092 
670 



Paid 

$50.00 

10.00 

195.00 

50.00 
55 "° 

35""' 
83.00 

100.00 



1 10.00 
35°° 

75.00 

45.00 

157.00 

5.00 

500 



1000 

5.00 

15.00 

42 00 



Unpaid Pledges 
$I5«> 



100 00 



25 00 



• 
* 



Total 

$65.00 

10.00 

195.00 

50.SO 
55.00 

35.00 

83.00 

200.00 



1 10.00 
60.00 

75.00 

45.00 

157.00 

5-©o 

5.00 



10.00 

5.00 

1500 

4a '■• 



DARTMOUTH GAME OPENS 

AGGIE'S SEASON 

Usual Hard Game Expected at Han- 
over on Saturday. 

The Massachusetts 1914 football 
Beason opens Saturday with Dart- 
mouth at Hanover. A very hard 
game is expected, but the team is 
out to make a good showing, and 
without being over confident, they 
expect to make things interesting for 
the Hanoverian team. Last year, the 
M. A. C. team put up a splendid 
tight at Hanover, leading the strong 
Dartmouth team by a score of 8-0 
until the final two minutes of play, 
when the string of fresh men which 
Coach Canavaugh kept rushing on the 
field proved too mnch for the Aggie 
boys, and they lost at 18-3. Dart- 
mouth practise started one week ahead 
,»f M A C. practise this year, and 
the Hauoverians should be in great 




20,00 


15.00 


3S-O0 


72.OO 


I0.OJ 


82.00 


305.OO 


19500 


50000 


270.CO 


5000 


320.00 


IIO.OO 


1500 


13500 


64.OO 


2500 


89.00 


I97OO 


20.00 


2 17.00 


55S.OO 


44*M» 


1,000.00 


37*.»5 


52.OO 

*97400 


484**5 


I3.190.a5 


*4,i64*5 


i.724»4 


493 76 


2,21800 



1712 



*4.9»449 

1,00042 

10.00 

ajooo 

514.16 

8.12 



« 1. 467.76 



75.00 



*6,38a.5 

1,000.42 

85.00 

250.00 

514.16 

8.12 



Final totals 



$6.687. 19 #i,S4»76 18,239 95 



•The class secretaries of '<»• and '02 are coll.-clini{ funds 
igojhas astuini-d t«-s|« 

. ... M. ■ 1 t.i.n>M fc , 

hrrfe »• an alumni conttilrution and that the entering dais 



M umed rattWMlMlKH t* las building ..f an entrance gate. 
IS t"elTn 3 „ rt undergraduate contribute » due ft*. facMh.Mhe -o^cont^buted 



by the class of 1914 appear* for the first Hi 

of 1018 has made no contribution to the fund as »et. 



[Continued on page '> | 



Of the total amount of money paid 
In, 16,160 has been paid ont, 
15,850 being paid out on the Alumni 
Field contract for grading, 1810 for 
other items necessary since the cam- 
paign for raising funds, such as the 
cost of printing, pictures and other 
campaign material, purchase of 
drawings, tile, freight on fertilisers, 
cost of seed, labor putting on fertil- 
iser and seeding, seed and tools for 
digging ditches. In the next finan- 
cial report an itemized aeconnt of 
expenditures will be given. 

At the present time we are facing 
the f ottowing proposition •. the money 



on hand, all but 1525, has been 

spent, and we still have nearly 1*2000 

to pay as a final payment on grading 

and field work, besides purchase of 

additional seed ami rest of seeding 

down remainder of field. These 

items must be taken care of this fall. 

Last June it was thought best to 

make the contract for grading the 

entire field. By so doing, the field 

grading has been done for several 

hundred dollars less than would have 

been the case otherwise. At that 

time the students voted to permit 

tile committee to use the Student 



Cotton rt, Merrill lg, Smith rg, 
Milroore c, Glee gb, Whitney lhb, 
Garish or Curtis rhb, Vinson and 
Thielseher fb. Many new "Awls" 
have been made at * Dartmouth this 
year, and it is very probable thai her 
line will be stronger than ever. 

The M. A. C. squard has had hard 
practise for two weeks. Despite the 
excessive warm weather, Coach 
Brides has held several hard scrim- 
mages, and every man on the squad 
has had a chance to show what he 
can do. Last Saturday, the 'varsity 
was lined np against both the second 
string men and freshman teams and 
in each ease scored two touchdowns. 
The team has been coming along well 
this week ami seems in good condi- 
tion for the Saturday game. Quite 
a number of Aggie men have signi- 
fied their Intention of accompanying 
the team to Hanover and a special 
car with reduced rates for students 
will leave on Friday. Any man who 
makes up his mind to go should see 
Prof. Hicks immediately. It is 
pleasant to give the team a sendoff 
as in years past, to show the foot- 
ball men that Massachusetts expects 
them to do their duty, and has im- 
plicit confidence in her team. 



[Continued on 



til 



Adams and Nelson '17 both of 
Kewboryport have pledged Kappa 
Gamma Fht. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Sept. 22, 1914. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Sept, 22, 1014- 



SIGNIFICANCE OF THE SEAL 

A facsimile of the new seal 
recently adopted by the Massaciu - 
setts Coli.egiak is shown below with 
a description of the various symbols 
shown therein. 




The U M H which occupies the centre 
of the seal is the symbol of our col- 
lege, and as it stauds out above the 
rest of the figures in the seal, so 
should the best interests of our col- 
lege occupy the central place in our 
minds and hearts. 

Again, as the block "M" appears 
as the award of merit to the mem- 
bers of the college teams, it should 
appear in the official seal of the col- 
lege paper. As the State is superior 
to and tesponsible for our college, 
so the crest of the state should stand 
above the symbol of the collage. To 
every part of the world from our 
State and college go forth our gradu- 
ates c 




am! Ihost poweiful 
rays passing through the symbol of 
the college, reach the whole State of 
Massachusetts as written upon the 
scroll. In olden days most of the 
writing was done on scrolls ; hence the 
scroll is emblematic of our college 
paper. 

A garland of oak leaves was be- 
stowed by the Romans on those who 
had saved the life of a citizen in bat- 
tle ; it is fitting therefore, that the oak 
and acorn of Massachusetts should 
appear in the emblem of those who 
tight the no less glorious battles of 
peace. By the uative oak we typify 
the strength and loyalty of Massa- 
chusetts men. The name — * 4 Thk 
Massa* IIU9ETTS COLUOIAX" — and 
the date of its adoption are plainly 
written across the face of the seal, 
and as this is the title of our college 
paper, so should it be the title of the 
seal. 



PRESS CLUB 

The first regular meeting of the 
Press club was held Wednesday 
evening. Formal organization took 
place and a constitution was accepted, 
following which there was election of 
otlicers. The following men were 
elected for the year: President, 
Rogers '10; vice-president, H. G. 
Hyde'l">; secretary-treasurer L. P. 
Whitney '16. The office adjoining 
the Cou.eoian room has been secured 



for the present and will be used as 
heaaquarters. About ten prominent 
city newspapers are represented in 
the club and many more will be added 
as soon as possible. Ralph J. Watts 
secretary to the college, and Krwin 
H. Foroush of the Extension ser- 
vice were present and assisted in the 
organization. 

WEDNESDAY ASSEMBLY 
At the assembly, Wednesday, Dr. 
Sprague of M. A. C. gave an inter- 
esting lecture on the present war in 
Europe His talk in part was: 
'•The present war in Europe, which 
in reality is a conflict that all the 
powers of that continent have been 
preparing for for the last fifty years, 
is a struggle for the mastery of the 
world. 

"The cause of this conflict is more 
deeply COOted than we naturally 
think. The assasi nation of the Aus- 
trian crown pri&oe and princess 
was merely a result or incident which 
was bound to come sooner or later as 
the people begin to realize the 
advantages of a republic. 

•The real cause of this agitation 
is the sins of these nations in the 
past. Since Peter the Offset 
ascended the throne of Muskovy, 
Russia has been expanding with 
alarming rapidity in all directions. 
The great dream of this inland 
nation was to reach a seaport which 
would be an outlet for its immense 

MkeftWNwri ' W * t l ** ur » ' products. 

1 port. 

Siberia, 

But here she was brought to a stand- 
still by Japan. Now having to look 
elsewhere for its one hope, she 
spread towards the south to the 
Black sea. For a century, England 
has been in her path, menacing her 
and even threatening her, while she 
was endeavoring to reach the Medit- 
terranean. Indeed, Turkey can 
thank England for still being on the 
map. The prize that Russia now 
expects is a portion of eastern Ger- 
many with a long sea coast. 

"Austria has long been looking 
forward for a bigger coast-line. A 
piece of the Balkans with Montene- 
gro, and (Ireece thrown in, is her 
present desire. The Italians aie 
waiting for an opportune moment 
when they can step in and regain 
Triste and Trente, two of their 
former possessions now under Aus- 
trian control. 

"The greatest mistake that Ger- 
many ever made was to acquire 
Alsace and Lorraine. The French 
have never forgotten this, and thev 
will never lay down their arms until 
they gain possession of these provin- 
ces again. Germany's dream is to 
make a great German-speaking em- 
pire. She is not looking for more 
territory, although an additional 
piece of land would be gladly ac- 
cepted. 

** England could not keep out of 
this war if she wanted to. At last 



the moment has arrived when she 
can strike. For the last lift v Years, 
Germany's commerce has grown and 
developed until it has endangered 
England's mastery of the sea. If 
England could destroy the German 
fleet and thus cripple her trade she 
would once again enjoy perfect tran- 
quility and ease. 

"The great fault of this war, how- 
ever, is that the great powers are 
arrayed against the highest form of 
civilization on the earth — the Ger- 
man civilization. The problem that 
now confronts England is the divis- 
ion of land if the allies should win. 
The key to England's success lies in 
Gibraltar and the Suez canal. 
What will result only the future can 
tell, and for this we must wait. One 
thing, however, we are now sure of: 
whatever the outcome, the map of 
Europe will be greatly altered when 
the greatest war of all ages is finally 
settled." 



CROSS COUNTRY PROSPECTS 

With a good nncleus of last years 
squatf to build on, a fairly strong 
cross country team is looked for. 
The ineligibility of all freshmen to 
participate for varsity sports the first 
semester makes it absolutely neces- 
sary for a better showiug of meu 
from the three upper classes thau has 
been the custom. 

Besides the annual intercollegiate 
meet at Dartmouth in November 
ahere will be an interclass meet which 



probably will take place on Oct. 17, 
the exact date depending upon the 
dates still undecided, of the other 
two meets, one with Amherst and the 
other with Vermont. These four 
meets are all that can be carried, and 
still allow the freshman schedule 
which is being arranged with Mon 
son and Williston academies. 

Any man, big or little, who is 
willing to run to breakfast or chapel 
should turn out for at least one trial 
with the squad. The success of the 
cross country team will largely 
depend upon the size of the squad. 

RUSHING RULES 

At a recent meeting of the Frater- 
nity conference an impartant change 
in the rushing rules was decided upon. 
The rushing season will now close 
Thursday afternoon at bix o'clock, 
Oct. ft, and the pledging date will be 
the following chapel hour, on Friday, 
Oct. 9. As in previous years, all 
fraternities will cease to rush fresh- 
man at the close of the rushing sea- 
son on Thursday and the freshman 
will pledge only at the close of chapel 
hour. 

The change in the date of the 
closing of the season is due to the 
fact that the Monday morning orig- 
inally selected is the half holiday 
given in observance of Columbus 
da v. 



'12.— Peckham has stopped teach- 
ing at Wooster, N. Y. and is going 
on to a farm. 




Keep a-going! 

We are all praise for the fellow who can 
win! By the by, you fellows elected a 
winner a few years ago. We first offer. <l 
Fatima Cigarettes for sale in the collets 
towns. We put excellent tobacco in this 
smoke — we watched you! Quick enough 
you discovered them, and that the t»bnc< 
was likable, and from this small begin- 
ning they have "kept going" all over 
this big country until today they arc U 
biggest selling cigarette in the U. S. A.! 
Plain package, but SO choice ones. 




"Distinctively Individual 




CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

The first meeting the M. A. C 
Christian Association was held in the 
chapel Thursday evening at 6-80. 
The attendance of men from all the 
classes, especially the freshmen, 
showed that the association might 
look for good support in the carrying 
out of its plans for the coming year. 
Mr. Clarence P. Shedd, the secretary 
of college Y. M.C. A. 'sin Massachu- 
setts and Rhode Island, gave an 
interesting and convincing talk on 
character building and what it means 
to the young man in after life. The 
association proposes to have various 
speakers address the meetings from 
time to time, men of prominence from 
both the local colleges and elsewhere, 
but this type of meeting will not 
necessarily constitute the important 
part of the work as mapped out by 
the cabinet. 

The cabinet is a new feature of the 
organization this year and consists of 
the ollicers of the association and the 
chairmen of the various committees, 
with Mr. Sherk acting in an advisory 
capacity. The first active work of 
the association is the gaining of valu- 
able information by means of a can- 
vass of the two lower classes. Within 
the next few weeks every member of 
the freshman and sophomore classes 
will be called upon by members of the 
association and will be asked to fill 
out blanks giving such data as church 
preference, interest in athletics. 
musical clubs, debating, dramatics 
end work in the Christian Association. 
Thus the officers of all these various 
college activities will be able to find 
out what men are available as material 
for their particular organization. 
These cards will be kept on file by the 
secretary of the association and the 
information on them will be at the 
disposal of any who desire it. 

Another feature of this year's pro- 
gram will be the holding of informal 
social gatherings after the Thuisday 
evening meetings on the average of 
(,nce a month, the object being to pro- 

le more of a feeling of friendly 

comradeship among the members. 
Bible classes will be organized al»out 
the middle of October and will con- 
tinue for a term of about ten weeks 
up to < hristmas vacation Later in 
the year classes in life problems, 
taught by different members of the 
faculty, will be held for all those who 
nre interested in this phase of the 
work. The teaching of foreigners in 
the outlying districts around Amherst 
will l>e taken up later in the fall. It 
is hoped to have all this work 
thoroughly organized this year under 
association influence ami all interested 
should take up the matter with Mr. 
Le Due, 1915, who Is In charge of the 
work among foreigners. Boys' Club 
work will this year come under the 
leadership of Dana Merrill 1917 who 
is anxious to get as many as possible 
enlieted in tilt form of community 
service. This work is one of the most 
usef ul and interesting of any offered 



bv the association and should meet a 
readv response among all who have 
any ability in hand'ing boys. 

In every way possible, this Chris- 
tian Association is doing its best to 
improve the general atmosphere of 
the college, good as it is already. It 
is hoped that a larger number of stu- 
dents than ever will pay their annual 
membership fees of one dollar, thus 
helpiug to put the association finan- 
cially on its feet and to enlarge the 
influence of the largest single organi- 
zation in the college today. 



Suits For Young Fellows 



RECEPTIONS 

TRHOKKKO 



BY PRESIDENT 



I liKSII- 



TO FACULTY ANO 
MAN CLASS. 

President and Mrs. Buttei field held 
an informal reception for the entering 
class at the president's house Satur- 
day. About one hundred of the 
f reehmen attended and were given an 
excellent opportunity to meet per* 
■onallj ik Prexy" and those members 
of the faculty with whom they will 
come in contact during the year. 
The reception rooms were artistically 
decorated with gladioli, asters, palms, 
and autumn leaves. 1 B the receiving 
line were the president and his wife, 
Professor and Mrs. llasbrouck. Mr. 
anil Mrs. Machmer, and several other 
members of the faculty. Some of 
the upper classmen were present and 
assisted in introducing the new men. 
The evening was spent in getting 
acquainted, singing college songs, 
and in general conversation. Re* 
frcaluuents of ice creai.. and cek< 
were served by the hostess. 

On Friday evening a reception t«» 
the faculty was given b\ President 
and Mrs. Butterfield at their bone. 
It was attended by nearly the entire 
faculty, and a very pleasant evening 
was enjoyed by all. 

COUNTRY LIFE CLUB 

The first meeting of the Country 
Life Club will be held Wednesday 
evening in Room < I, South College 
at 7-00 p. M. Every one interested 
in Rural life and its problems should 
be there. That means every "Aggie" 
man. Men from this institution will 
and should be leaders in the com- 
munities into which they go; and 
while here should take every oppor- 
tunity to learn Rural life condition-. 
problems, and ways of meeting and 
bettering those that they find unsatis- 
factory. This club is nation wide 
in its scope, having branches in sev- 
eral colleges. Aggie is among the 
first to organize a live club. Our own 
prexy Ib among those working hard- 
est to spread the movement, and to 
keep this college at the front in lead- 
ing it. Start the year right by being 
present at the first meeting. Gel 
into the movement. Don't forget 
the time and the place. 



The young college man or 
any wide-awake young fellow 
enjoys wearing the clothes that 
have life worked into them. 

We've established a reputation 
for having the thing. 

Young men who want live 
clothes come here for them. 

The Hart Schaff ner& Marx 
The A. B. Kirschbaum Co. 

There are none better. 

There are many smart and 
beautiful new fabrics this fall. 
The tailoring is along English 
lines. 

Our prices are never high. 



Suits at $15, $17, $18, $19, $20, $22, $23 and $24. 
Cheaper Suits if you want them t $10, $12, $13, $14. 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 





Twenty-five cents will be put in a box for tne 
NEW ATHLETIC FIELD every time you 
buy shoes at our store costing $3.50 or over. 

VERY I.VTEST STYLUS. 

Shoes for the Drill-$2.50 to $5.00 

F*o«e'«* Shoe JStoi?© 

School and College photographers . . . 




1 r*>C*AI rV» 52 Center St., Northampton, Mass., 

i_t->o and South Hadley, Mass. 



Main Office: 

1546-1548 Hroadway, 

New York City 



These Studios offer the beM skilled 
artists and most complete 

equipment obtainable 



*18.— Frank Cully, assistant pro- 
fessor of landscape gardening at 
Iowa State College at Ames, Iowa, 
got his master's degree from Harvard 
this yesr. 



My Fall and Winter Woolens and Gents* Furnishing 
4rt- fC©W Complete 

A very nobby line of everything in suits and overcoats. All the latest fashion.. 

y FULL DRESS SUITS TOR RENT 

We dS Dyeing; Cleaning, Altering and Pres«ng of Lad.ei and Gents Garments. 

y * I g\ n mi best p»f*w»l attention 

■■ a UWOVITZ* 11 Amity St., Anilierat. Tel 302-W 
1 * A " THE LEADINa TAILOR 

JACKSON & CUTLER 

DEALERS IN—— 

Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 



to 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Sept. 22, 1914. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Sept. 22, 1914. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS 



Editor-i 

Managing 

Assistant 

Athletic 

Athletic 



FRANK W. BUELL 'is. 

TYLER S. ROGERS '16, 

HENRY H. WHITE '15, 

JAMES A. PRICE 'is. 

E. SUMNER DRAPER 'is 

THOS. L. HARROCKS '16, Department 

ALFRED A. GIOIOSA'i6, Campus 

MILFORD R. LAWRENCE '17, 

Associate 
RICHARD W. SMITH '17. Associate 



n-Chief 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 

Editor 
Editor 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

MAURICE J. CLOUGH '■$, Business Manager 
CHAS A. HUNTINGTON. JR. '16, 

Assistant Business Manager 
W.RICHARD SEARS 'is. Advertising Man'g'r 
LESTER E. FIELDING '16, Ass't Adv. Mgr. 
BIRGER R. ROSEQUIST'i7, Circulation 



Subscription fi.50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable 
to Maurice J. Clough. 



at the Amherst 



Office. 



Vol. XXV. Tuesday, Sept. a*. No. 2 



Friday noon the football team 
leaves the center for Hanover and 
the first game of the year with Dart- 
mouth. Last year a roaring good 
send off was given the team aud it 
seems appropriate that it should be 
repeated this year. This occasion 
serves a double purpose for it not 
only speeds the team to Dartmouth 
but it also practically gives the men 
their send off for the season. It is 
ub uxiubtliou 



the awarding of medals bearing this 
seal is made in another part of the 
paper. Realizing that some other 
recognition was due the men who 
have worked for this paper other 
than the experience they gained, the 
board decided that a gold medal 
bearing the Collegian seal would be 
an appropriate reward. These 
medals were given to the senior mem- 
bers of the 1914 board of editors and 
have also been awarded to the sen- 
iors on the present board. 

The Collegian competition starts 
the first of October and with the 
present inducements it is expected 
that a large number of contestants 
will enter the competition. It is a 
process of elimination in which it is 
intended to select the men best suited 
for the work. Last year there were 
24 who worked for these positions 
and it is hoped that an equally large 
nnmber will come out this year. 
The Collegian is constantly growing 
in importance throughout college 
affairs and it has an ever extending 
field of action for the future. 



COLLEGE MEN 

NEED FOUNTAIN PENS 

A Waterman, Parker of Morse, and the 

Paper and Ink. 

When you buy, stock up also with what is needed in the toilet 
line— TOOTH, HAIR AND SHAVING BRUSHES, TOOTH 
POWDER OR CREAM, SHAVING CREAM, POWDER OR 
STICK, SPONGES, COMBS, SOAP, &c. 



THE HENRY ADAMS CO., Druggists 

The REXALL Store on the Corner 




extensive a program as was arranged 
last year but there should be as much 
done as can possibly be arranged to 
insure a good showing of Aggie 
spirit and to show the team that every 
man in college is behind them. 



Posted in various parts of the 
town of Amherst in conspicuous posi- 
tions are notices relative to bicycle 
riding. These notices are so placed 
by the town officials and prohibit 
bicycle riding on the sidewalks of 
the town. It is certainly true that 
these regulations must be equally 
observed by the studeuts of this col- 
lege as well as by the inhabitants of 
the town if not more so. As the 
town officials are beginning to employ 
stringent methods in enforcing these 
rules would it not be better for the 
student body to observe them rather 
than to have another occurrence sim- 
ilar to that which took place in the 
town hall at the moving picture 
show a year ago. Such things are 
always exaggerated and are ex- 
tremely <l«t >i in.nt.il to the name of 
the college. Along the same line it 
is suggested that a Senate rule which 
prohibits the riding of bicycles on 
the campus walks should be enforced, 
as has been the case in former years. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

(Notices for this column should be dropped in 
the Collegian Office or handed to Alfred A. 
Gioiosa' 16, on or before the Saturday preceding 
each issue. 1 

Sept. 23—1-10 p. m., Wednesday 
Assembly. Pres. E. T. Fair- 
child, N. H. state college. 

Sept. 24—6-45 p. m„M. A. C. C. A. 



Dartmouth at 



Sept. 80—1-10 p. m., Wednesday 
Assembly. Director W. II. 
Jordan, Agr. Exp. Station, 
Geneva, N. Y. 



UNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

liH.UU; SUNDAY SERVICE AT 7 P M. 



E. RUSSELL NORTON 

SALES AGENT 

Davenport Miller 
Vein Coal 

Best Quality Pennsylvania Coal 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 



MODERN REPAIR DEPT. 



E.M.BOLLES 

THE shofmah 



E E. MILLETT 

JEWELER and OPTOMETRIST 

Lenses ground while you wait 

College Jewelry 

Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and Guitar Strings 

AMHKK8T, MASS. 
Next to Host Office. 



Amherst 



CLASS ELECTIONS 



An article relative to the seal of 
The Massachusetts Collegian and 



The senior and junior classes held 
class elections the past week. The 
ollicers elected for 1 9 1."» are : Presi- 
dent, Philip Whitmoreof Sunderland ; 
vice-president, George Melican of 
Worcester ; secretary, O. W Slein of 
New Biaintree ; treasurer, A. Flebut 
of Amherst; class captain, R. C. 
Hall of Worcester ; sergeant at arms, 
A. Wilkins of Wakefield ; historian, 
H. H. White of West Peabody. 

The juniors elected to ollice are ; 
President, W. Dodge of Geneva. (). ; 
vice-president, Lewis Schlotterbeck 
of Koxhut v Station, Conn. ; treas- 
urer, Ralph Taber of Fhenix MilI§,N, 
Y. ; historian, P. Simmons of Pitts- 
field ; secretary, Herbert Walkden of 
Weatford ; class captain, George 
Palmer of Brook line ; sergeant-at- 
arms. Homer Darling of Mendon. 

The officer* elected by the fresh- 
man claw are : President, Robert L. 
Boyd of Lynn ; vice-president, Lewis 
W.Spauldingof Hingham ; secretary, 
R. W.Thorpe of Medford ; treasurer, 
H. N. Worthier of Wakefield ; class 
captain, Herbert H. Baxter of Brigh- 
ton ; sergeant-at-arms, Forrest Gray- 
boq of Mi I fur, I. 



BOSTON OFFICE 

85 Water St. 



NEW YORK OFFICE 

1 Broadway 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

CURRAN & DYER, Prop*. 

Loose* Leaf Note Books and Fountain 
-Pena— 



CO - OP LAUNDRY 

High-Grade College Work 



Shirts, 
Collars, 
Cuffs, - 
Plain wash, 
Same, rough dry, 



10-15C 

2 I-2C 

a 1-2C 
48c per dor. 
30c per dor. 



DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing, 50c a Suit 

Dry Cleaning and Pressing, $1.50 a Suit 

Agents: Sherinvan, Frost. 

Try our ticket system 

Put full name and address on laundry 



"The Sap of the Soil" 

We frequently hear farmers speak of the "sap of the soil"— a 
phrase which expresses a great deal. All cultivated plants take up 
their food in dilute solution. The sap of a tree or plant circulates 
throughout its system of trunk, branches and leaves, carrying with it 
the nourishment necessary for its upbuilding, as does the blood in ani- 
mals. This sap has been absorbed from the soil through the roots of 
the plant, and is charged more or less with plant food ingredients 
which were either applied in a soluble form or were rendered soluble 
through bacterial action in the soil, or through the digestive process 
which takes place in contact with the roots of plants. Manure or com- 
mercial fertilizers enrich the sap of the soil by supplying additional 
quantities of available plant food. Bacteria, as we have seen, help to 
break down the organic forms of plant food and render them soluble 
for the sap of the soil to absorb. 

Study the Plant Food Problem. 
Can we help you f 



bowker :; 



NY 
Chatham St., Boston 



The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

jobbers of Wrought Iron and Brass Pipe. Valves 
ind Fittings for Steam, Water ami Oas. Asbestos 
l7id Magnesia Boiler and Pipe Coverings. IMpe 
Cut to sketch. Mill Supplies. Engineers and 
Contractors for Steam and Hot Water Heating. 
Automatic Spr.nkler Systems. Boiler and Re 
Connections. - - Holyoke. Mm, 



Reaerved for 



BECKMAN 



H t» m i» • • 



FIRST METTAWAMPE TKEK 

The first Mettawampe trek of the 
year was held Saturday, when a group 
of 1."), including President Rutterfield, 
Ray Stannard Raker, and several 
students, climbed Mt. Norwottuck. 
the highest peak in the Holyoke 
range. The party, with the excep- 
tion of the President and Mr. Raker 
who joined the rest at a point along 
the route, took the car as far aB the 
Notch and walked the remaining dis- 
tance. After reaching the top of 
Norwottuck, the men descended the 
north Blope, through the woods until 
they struck the Ray State road, by 
which thev returned to Amherst 



Hubbard's BasE Fertilizers 



the most economical you can use. 

BetteR CROrb 

are the inevitable result. 




LlZl#* 



THE ROGERS fc HUBBARD COMPANY, Middletown, Conn. 

onio- Hint Work*, !■<>■ >i-«i«"i. Conn. 



t_OW PRICE T»ll-ORING CO. 

SUITS MADE TO ORDER 
Suits Cleaned. Pressed and Dyed. All kinds of 
" adies and Gentlemen neatly done, 
rk by first class tailor. Work 



KepainliK for Ladies and Gentlemen neatly done 
lliih-grade work by first class tailor. Work 
called for and delivered. Sell tickets for pressing. 



4 SUITS FOB J 1 10 

GEORGE KOTOWITZ, Prop. 

Main Street. Amherst Mass. Naih Mtock 
On your way to the Post Office Tel. 438 W 



FLEMING'S SHOE STORE 



Northampton 



For particular people 

THE ELMS RESTAURANT 

213 Main St., Northampton 

(Near Amherst car line) 



A Quality Restaurant at Moderate 
Prices. 

TRY OUR SPECIALS 

And a la carte service. 

OYSTERS STEAKS CHOPS 
FRIED CHICKEN, ETC. 

Open 6 a. M. to 1 1 p. m. 



FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

drown by the Floricultural Dept. 

We offer our surplus stock of cut 
flowers and plants at reasonable rates 
to students and faculty. This stock 
is grown in modern houses under 
ideal conditions. Roses, carnations, 
violets, chrysanthemums and sweet 
peas in season. 

GROWN ON THE CAMPUS 

Telephone SOO 



We have an opportunity for several 
young men during the summer 
to sell goods of our manu- 
facture to fanners on a 
commission basis. 
— Address — 



JOINT COMMITTEE ON INTER 
COLLEGIATE ATHLET- 
ICS MEETS 
On Saturday morning the first 
meeting of the year of the joint 
committee on Intercollegiate Athlet- 
ics was held. Several important 
matters were brought up besideB the 
regular routine business and election 
of officers. The committee officers 
for the following year are as follows : 
Prof. E. M. Lewis, president; Prof. 
P. B. Hasbrouck, vice-president ; Mr. 
George Chapman, secretary ; Prof. 
Curry Hicks, executive officer. The 
naming of the executive committee 
was held over until the next meetiug. 
Athletic appropriations for the var- 
ious sports were voted, substantially 
the same a* the past year. Frank 
Anderson 'lfi was elected one of the 
assistant managers of 'varsity hoc-key 
to fill the vacancy caused by the re- 
signation of T. Palmer Wilcox '16. 
By action of the committee, 'var- 
sity tennis is dropped as an inter- 
collegiate sport for the present sea- 
son, to be resumed when the tennis 
courts on the new athletic field are 
built and put in proper playing con- 
dition, subject to the approval of the 
Board. This action was taken for 
the following reasons; first, the 
finances of the association are very 
low, due to the amount of money be- 
ing spent on the athletic field ; sec- 
ond, the committee did not deem it a 
good policy to spend a large sum of 
money in fixing the present antiqua- 
ted 'varsity courts, in view of the 
fact that new courts are to be built 
In the near future on Alumni Field ; 
third, the committee did not consider 
it possible for a tennis team of inter- 
collegiate standing to be sent out 
from M. A. C. while the playing con- 
ditions are so poor. The manager of 
'varsity tennis, H. W. Bishop 16, 
retains Mb present standing and is 
given charge of intramural tennis in 
M. A. C. A part of the appropria- 
tion which would go to 'varsity tennis 
is to be used for tournaments, etc.. 
within the college. 



ffl 1 C J are supplied every year 

Burpee s Deeds tr^r^t 

the seeds of any other growers. Do you know Burpee- 
Quality "Seeds that Grow" ? If not, we would like to 
make your acquaintance. Simply send us your address 
(a postal card will do) and you will receive Burpee's 
Annual for 1914,— a bright new book of 182 pages, which 
is recognized as "The Leading American Seed Catalog." 
Kindly write to-day! Address 

. ATLEE BURPEE & CO., Burpee BaUdingt, Philadelphia 



W 




. A. 




MEN'S 



USE OUR NEW CASH DISCOUNT CARD 
AND SAVE FIVE PEH^ENT^ON 

I*, § 




SHOES, HATS 

Furnishings and Custom Tailoring 

IMPORTANT NOTICE 

Mr. Campion has just returned from England with the 

AQUASENTUM OVERCOATS 
Wells-Margetson Neckwear, Caps & Knitted Vests 

On account of war it will not be possible to get any more of 
these goods, so an early inspection will be to your advantage. 




Barren Manufacturing Co. 

35 Wendell St., Boston, Mitt. 



'05.— Prof. J. F. Lyman, of tin- 
Ohio State university, is the author 
of an article in Popular Science 
Monthly for August, 1914, entitled 
"Available Food Supplies." 



Men's Tailoring Fine Furnishing 

See Our Agents 



C&rptivter St Morehousti 
PRINTERS, 

No. i, Cook Place, Amherit, Mas*. 




The Mas.sachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Sept. 22, 1914. 



* THE 

Hoover & Smith Go. 

616 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 
Diamond Merchants 

Philadelphia's Official Fraternity Jeweler 

SPECIALISTS IN 

Fraternity Badges, Fobs, Novelties, 

Rings, Charms Prises Trophies. 

Medals College Pins, Fobs, Seals' 

Rings, Charms.'. 



"SCOTTIE" 
H. HOOPER 

Will (lean and press your clothes so you 

will be satisfied. It rosis no more 

and he is nearer to "Aggie." 

I.IBKKAI Tir KFT SYSTEM 

Under Columbia Cafe 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Now at 13 Pleasant St. 
Oculists' 1'iescriptious Filled. Broken Lenses 

Accurately Replaced. Tine Watch Repairing 
Promptly and >kiliully Done. 

Satisfaction (iuaranteerl 

E. B. DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 
Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hours: '"iimiA m„ i-30tojP. M. 



STEAM FITTING. 
GAS FITTING, I INNING. 



Telephone 59 — R 



P. W. DANCE & CO,, Plumbers 

Specialty of Repairing 

Church Winhows, Memorial 
Winmows, Lkaij Lights, &c. 

C M»n w AMHFKST. MASS. 



II IIC I'lSI*!***"*' PAWI.OU 

CI.'.lllnillK l'l .— -i ill; l;. |i.i I 1 I 111: 

oiii«k<-»i >.-r\ u»'. b«*«i vv«»ik iiiur.i I'rloe 

All work carefully done. Work t:,illed for and 
delivered. ii"iits' ov e r coat «■ suit*, pants mH 
coats. Ladies' fine linen «u>ts a specialty. 
Teams will call every day at M. A. C. 

WW. Kit IMil IN. I«r€»|.. 

Rear Nash Bl'k \mher*t Tel. No. w* 



Now is the time to be planning for 

Fraternity Groups 

Have them taken at 

MISS McCLELLAN'S STUDIO 

41 State Street, ^^81 Northampton. Mass 



*3 



11 



; 



THE 

SMOOTHEST TOBACCO 

|FT b the moony mjM ™* p/p 6 "^ V ^ Ket 
'—that's aqoyment enough for tome of us. 

Vet** tobacco—toe fee* fesf h *■ 9%* «> y » cea 

2year»topr« J 

Ark', good. 



woo- 



Foil Two 







1 



7 <>H., 



i I 

I 



V***V 



ATHLETIC FIELD REPORT 

[Continued from page i] 

Athletic Fund as a security in mak- 
ing the contract. 

In now becomes necessary to raise 
the balance of the money bo that the 
regular athletic activities may not 
be handicapped during the year. 
Several hundred dollars are in sight, 
coming fiom classes whose secre- 
taries have not yet turned in their 
class contributions. We have yet 
to raise from SHOO to $1000 in order 
to pay up for the work to be com- 
pleted this fall. We trust that the 
alumni will realize that an athletic 
Held has been graded and seeded 
and that we need some assistance 
from . <ch and every loyal Aggie 
alumnus. 

RIFLE TEAM RESUME AND 
PROSPECTS 

fContinued from page i] 

team. Kvery nian will haw a show 
according to the regularity ami qual- 
ity of his shooting, and competition 
is needed to develop the strongest 
possible team. The indoor range is 
situated behind the lockers in the 
Drill Hall annex and will be open at 
an early date. The schedule of 
matches and the rules have not been 
received from the war department at 
Washington as yet, but they are 
expected to be very similar to last 
vear's. 



IOI3 NOTES 

Benjamin W. Kllis. Extension 
iottmctor in Farm Demonstration. 
Massachusetts Agricultural college. 

Paul .bnsin Pease, born Sept. 7th, 
1914. 

Clyde M. Packard, Entomologist 
I . S. Entomologist Laboratory, 
Hagerstown, Md., married July 19th. 

James B, Lake, ship draftsman, 
Navy yard. Charleston. S. C. 

(ieorge W. Barber. K.ntoiiiologist, 
l'. S. D. A., Charleston. Mo. 

St-m kt'iim II, Dohanian, M year 
student Harvard Foiestry shool. 
Address, ISA Cedar St., West 
SomcrvilU'. 

Harry W. Allen, (lypsy Moth 
Laboratory. Melrose Highlands. 
Scientific Assistant, C. S. Bureau of 
Entomology. 



One ounce bags 5 cents — con venient for cigarette smokers 



ALUMNI NOTES 

'02. — Prof. Claude I. Lewis, head 
of the division of horticulture in the 
Oregon Agricultural college and Ex- 
periment Stalion. has recently been 
appointed vice-director of the station. 

*0fi,— II. M. Russell is the author 
of V. S Department of Agriculture 
Bulletin 90 on "The Pose Aphis." 
'hi;.— W. C. Tannatt, town engineer, 
is in charge of the reconstruction of 
the "Mountain Uoad," so called, at 
Easthampton. The cost of the work 
will be about II 1.000. 

1#08 items. 

The 11)08 class cup has been pre- 



sented to Raymond Dean Whitmarsh 
Jr. on the first anniversary of his 
birthday. 

Mr. and Mrs. G. R. Cobb of 
Kiugston, R. I. announce the birth 
of a son, Roger Burnham, on July 
21, 1914. 

"diet" Warner was married to 
Miss Ruth Clark of Sunderland on 
Aug. 26, 1914 They will reside in 
Sunderland where "Chet" is engaged 
in onion growing. 

'11. — H R. Francis, who is now 
professor of landscape engineering in 
the college of forestry at Syracuse 
university, contributed an important 
illustrated article on k, New York 
Citv's Trees" to the August number 
of American Forest /•//. 

'12. — Benjamin Hubert was on the 
campus last week. The editor didn't 
see him but was glad to receive a 
note which he left. "I am leaving 
this afternoon for Orangeburg, S. C. 
This ends a short vacation. I am 
mighty glad to see so many great 
improvements about the campus, the 
athletic field looking especially fine." 

"18. — Laurence Burby is on a poul- 
try faim at Belchertown. 

ML— "Chet" Wheeler, landscape 
engineer with Edward Burnett, New 
York. Address, Box 236, Ipswich. 

'14. — "Joe" Sherman has been 
playing excellent ball for Greenfield 
this summer. He pitched winning 
games every time but two, and was 
the best batter in the league. We 
look to see him in major baseball 
very soon. 

'II — "Chick" Davies has been 
making good in major league base- 
ball this summer. He has done good 
work with Connie Mack's champion 
White Elephants. All M. A. C. 
men are proud of "Chick's" achieve- 
ments and are watching his progress 
daily. The people of Penbody, 
Chick's home town, are also proud 
of him. On Sept. .1 they held a 
Davies' day at Fenway Park when 
the Athletics played I double header 
with the Red Sox. Over a thousand 
of his townspeople took special trains 
to Boston that day and occupied a 
section of the grand-stand. In 
the second game Chick played left 
held, taking Rube Oldring's place. 
He was seeond in the batting order 
of the Athletics and upon his appear- 
ance at the hat in the first inning he 
was presented with a traveling bag, 
a purse containing 8l. r >0 in gold ami 
a basket of flowers. The presenta- 
tion was made by Dr. Daniel J. 
Kiley of North Attleboro, a former 
Pea body boy who was coach 
of the Peahody High nine when 
Davies was its star pitcher. 
"In the third inning of the game 
Chick had plenty to do. With OM 
down in this inning Chick took care 
of Speaker's fly in left center and 
then Duffey Lewis drove one to the 
score board in left field. Chick ran 
up the famous Duffey Cliff and 
crashed against the score board. He 



OVER 65 YEARS' 
If EXPERIENCE 




Trade Marks 
Designs 
■ , » . Copyrights Ac. 

Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
aulclily ascertain our opinion free whether an 
?n.«tii,-,nii nrohal.lr patentable. Ciiniiiiiinlca- 
ffo^strtctlyrniindertfal. HANDBOOK onl'ateuU 
lent free, oldest airency for securing patents. 

Patents taken through Munn A Co. receive 
$ptcial notice, without charge, In the 

Scientific American. 

a handsomely Illustrated weekly. Largest clr- 

MUNN & Co. 364 Broad * a » New York 

Br" cb Office. m F BU Washington. P. C. 



Batchelder & Snyder Co. 

PACKERS, POULTKV UKKSSKU8 
AND BUTTKK 1WAKKKS. 

WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

Beef. Mutton, Lamb, Veal. Pork, Lard. Mam*. 

Bacon, Sausages. Poultry, Game, Butter 

Cheese, Eggs. Beans. 

Office St Statu \iJS.SM0. u &/'J Btackstone St. 

Uoston. Packing House. Brighton. Mass. 

N.iti/e Poultry Dressing Plant. Iloston. 

Creameries in Vermont. 



WOOF-WOOF 

Mac, howse your dog? 
Dan, I did, 

Ha — ha, 
And another puppy bit 

the dust 



0g LAVAL 

as superior to other separa- 
tors as other separators are 
to gravity creaming. 




OIUER SEPARATORS SKIM cleaner 
than is possible on the average with gravity 
creaming, and De Laval Cream Separators 
>kim as much closer still than other separa- 
tors, particularly under the harder conditions 
of cool milk, running heavy cream or sepa- 
rating the milk of stripper cows. 

OTHER SEPARATORS SAVE THEIR 
cost every year, as a rule, over gravity cream- 
ing, and De Laval Separators save their cost 
every year over other separators alio iaat irooi 
ten to twenty years, or on an average trve 
times as long as other separators, 

WHY NOT SOLVE IT NOW IN THE 
only sure and safe way possible f H you haven t 
a separator, buy a De I-aval. If you have a 
poor separator, replace it with a De Laval. 



THE DE UMl SEPARATOR CO. 

New York Chicago San Francisco 



RAHAR'S INN 

Northampton. Massachusetts 
TWO 1LOCSS FROM TBI DEPOT 

The hotel where there is comfort (with- 
out extravagance.) More popular 
than ever. 

Special Luncheon 12-3 P. M. 

PRIVATE DINING ROOMS 

Ala Carts Service 

irom 6-.tO to II P.M. 



missed the ball by inches and in so 
doing cut the back of his right hand 
against the sheets of tin that are 
used on the score board to designate j 
the names of the teams. In the sev- 
enth inning Strunk singled to center 
and went to second when Barry 
singled along the third base line. 
McAvoy Hied to right. Pennock 
fanned and Murphy followed with a 
single to right field. Chick then 
came to the bat and ou a hit and run 
play he singled past second base 
scoring Barry, and Murphy went to 
second. This was the only hit that 
Chick got during the game. In the 
ninth inniug the Athletics started a 
rally. With two down Thompson 
and Murphy singled and Chick came 
to the bat. The majority of the 
crowd were standing when the Pen- 
body boy came to the plate with the 
determination to bring in the two 
base runners. The strain was too 
much, however, and the left fielder 
succumbed to Joe Woods' shoots for 
the final out. Although securing 
only one hit in the game Chick took 
care of everything that came his way 
in the field and the band of rooters 
left the game with the confidence 
that the Peabody hoy will make good 
with the famous White Klephants. 
Ned Edwards and Bill Hayden led a 
band of Mass. Aggie followers at the 
game. The regular college yell was 
given when Chick was presented 
with the gifts." 

PORTO BOO ALUMNI. 

The M. A. C. alumni of l'orto 
Rico held a reunion and banquet on 
the evening of July fourth at the 
Hotel Nava, San Juan. P. B« Those 
present were Dan Beainan W, W. 
V. Tower '03, Thomas II . .loues 'OH, 
Henry Cowles M0, and tt. J. Fiske 
M0. Messers. Armstrong, Smith, 
Merrill aud Van Zwalenburg were 
unable to get into San .Juan at the 
time. It was voted to make this 
reunion a regular affair. 

W. V. Tower has been made 
director of the Insular Experiment 
station located at Uio Piedras, just 
outside of San Juan. 

H. T. Cowles has been transferred 
from Rio Grande to Humiicao, of 
which district he is supervisor of 
schools. 

(George B. Merrill ex-M I has been 
transferred from Kusenada to Arbon- 
ito to work on tobacco insects. 

Captain William H. Armstrong *99 
has been transferred from San .luan 
to Cayey. 

Dan Beaman is located at Uio 
Piedras where he is owner of an 
extensive pineapple hacienda. 

R, J. Fiske MO has left the Insular 
Service and has accepted a position 
with the Federal Department of 
Agricultural Bureau of Entomology 
and has been assigned to duty in 
Grand Junction, Colo, is engaged 
in Coddling Moth investigatious. 
Address, cara of Burtau of Ento- 
mology, Washington, D, C. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Sept. 22, 19'^ 

Che Pheasant 

amtttJ St., •Binbcrdt 

Breakfast, Luncheon, 
Afternoon Tea. 

Dinner if arranged for. 

Telephone *7e 

Rooms for Transients. 

theTeachers Exchange 



An Especially Oood Commission Proposltlon- 
ctsbS test Wd,.s- Article widely Af^VwreTs 
Cuts down eapensa m jjo^.r 1 '»n»»- h A «f r r " s 

Philadelphia, Pa. 




They're not short-lived 

The Jerseys 




In 1913 eighteen Jer«cy 
cows were oTfit iu.ly tested 
which av 'rap d 



aid 7 months Oi arc 



years 
TT* 



a/era? 

v IS H 

tuttei 
ol th 

ycais 

longevity , Cor," 
Production arc .'c 

THE AMERICA* JIRSKY CsTTIE CMS 

324 W. UJU St., r*-;w Vtirk i Hy 



. .leir 

i:- ilk production 

nuK Average 

f pounds. One 

. 1 was over IS 

J. 

Hon c 4 Fronomic 

y i'. I'!. -» ■'.et'lsu^S. 



Of Bests* 12° Boyhton St. 

Recommends Teachers, Tutors and Schools 



| , ' r. » 1 . l3l S, fVV-fr 1 H A amo 

FOUNTAIN PEN 



VII I I ?>> Minimize your fountain pen 
I L .^r troubles by owning a Moore's. C W » the 
ml ^^safest, soundest and most depe ndable P«" known 
^«T Its strength lies in its very simplicity. Nothing 
finiky to get ou t of order. «L You can g ve your- ^ 
self nobetter treat than a Moore's Non-leakable. ft 
For Sale by Dealers Everywhere 

American Fountain Pen Company 

Adams. Cushlnft & Foater, ■••■**!£* — 
168 DEVONSHIRE STREET :: : BOS ON, MA.VS. 




E. Frank Coe Fertilizers 

1 1 — ^— — 

10C7 THE BUSINESS FARMERS' STANDARD IQId 
1857 FOR OVER FIFTY-FIVE YEARS 1 *f I** 

D o You Raise 300 Bushels of Potatoes per Acre? 

|HREE hundred bushels per acre is 
not an unusual yield by any means, 
but did you get it this year ? 
tgif you were planning to raise 300 
bushels of potatoes to the acre how 
far apart would you space your rows? 

How far apart would you drop the seed pieces in 

the row? 

©How much fertilizer would you use to grow 300 

bushels of potatoes per acre? How would you 

apply it ? 

«JAre you sure that your seed potatoes are true to 

name and true to type ? 

qWhat are you doing to prevent '•scab,'* and early 

and late blight ? 

CIDid you have a short crop of potatoes because of 

dry weather ? Have you decided how you will 
^overcome this trouble in the future ? 

C.AII th«s prsctiesl poiate, siid many mors, srs lolly covered ... our 
new book ^^ ^~ 

"Potatoes: A Money Crop 

which will be win Ire* to every potato gnmsr who requsat. s sopy, sad 

mentions this paper. 

OThis book is written by a msii who himiell has had yesre of experience a* 
Jlolato Jrowe" «a who has ».d. a c.reml stsdy ot thsbcat -ethod. d 
other grower*. _ , , f . 

qii you read this hook you will keep it lor future reference. It « s worth 
while" publication. 



The Coe-Mortimer Company 

81 CHAMBERS STREET, NEW YORK CITY 



I 



I 



8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Sept. 22, 1QJ4- 



JOIN THE BUNCH AT 



EPSTEIN'S TAILORING PARLORS 

Now located over post office. Up one flight 

Pressing and Cleaning a Specialty 

Liberal Ticket System Tat 3& M 



TOEPIL, MIENTKA 

MkOM Hhlne«« and PolUli«Ml—Makesolcl shoes 

look like new-Neat, classy workmanship. 
Main St- Open Sunday. On way to post office 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Offers courses of instruction in twenty six teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



FOUNTAIN PENS 



Moore's 



Swan's 



Waterman's 



The Highland Hotel 

Comer of Hillman and Barnes Streets, three 
blocks from the Union Depot, is a modern .hos- 
telry run on the European Plan. It is just a step 
from Main Street, away from the noise and dust 
and yet in the center of the business district. 

Its rooms are well furnished and comfortable, 
having a telephone and hot and cold running 
water in every room. Prices SI and up; rooms 
with oath (single) Sl.50 and up. 

Its excellent cuisine and well ventilated dining 
room makes a meal a pleasant "« morv -e v "y; 
thing of ihe highest quality, well cooked and 
served in the best possible manner. 

Stay at the Highland Hotel once and you will 
anticipate staying there again. Music every 
evening. 

D. H. SIEVERS, 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairyimg 

Poultry Husbandry 



Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 

Agricultural Chemistry 



Thirty-six dozen pens to select from. 

OUR RULE 

Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded." 



Highland Hotel, 



S|>rlugrl»l(l, Mil-". 



Economic Entomology 

Microbiology 

Plant Physiology and Pathology 

Agricultural Education 

For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



STUDEHT FURHITURE 

RUGS 

CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 
' LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 

E. D. MARSH ESTATE 



"l5F COX SONS 

^SK Mljk —AND — 

ILHMl vining 

7*-74 Madison Avenue, New York 

CAPS AND GOWNS 

Best Materials and Workmanship 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



Joint Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics, 

fit. A. C. Athletic Fie'd Association, 

The College Senate, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Rifle club, 

Roister Doisters 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Fifteen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Sixteeu Index, 

fit. A, C. Christian Association, 

II, A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Stockbridge Club, 



Philip H. Smith, Secretary 
C. S. Hicks, Treasurer 
E. Towne, President 
J. A. Price, Manager 
S. Prouty, filanager 

E. F. Clark, Manager 
B. S. Draper, Manager 

H. Bishop, Manager 

R. M. Upton, President 

K. M. Prouty, filanager 

F. A. Anderson, Manager 

H. M. Rogers, Manager 

L. E. Fielding, Manager 

H. H. White, President 

.1. K. Harper, President 

F. W. Buell, President 
P. F. Whitmore, President 



i-'.,i»«i.i«iini i«oa 

Stkphbn Lank Foloer 

hanupaotuk1no jbwklbk 

ISO BROADWAY, NKW YORK 

CLUB AND OOLLBOE 
1-lNS AND KINGS * 

„OLD. .ILVHR AM BRONBK MBUAW. 




W**l«l*t <3te I>ita»or. 

spring CatHlogue 
Containing Prices and Styles of 

Base Ball, Lawn Tennis, Golf and 
General Athletic Goods - IS OUT 

The Wright & Ditson Base Ball Uniform* 
are bettef than erar this year »*"<**" 
should write for samples and prices. 

Catalogue Fit KK to any addreia 

WK1GUT J* DITSION 

344 Washington St., lotto*. Mass. 



There are Seven Good Reasons why you should 
buy your 

COAL 

or 

C. R. ELDER 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 



*7 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



Stationery, Newspapers, 
Magazines and Col- 
lege Supplies 

A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer. 



The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Mt., alongside the 
famous Bloody Brook battle ground 
to Old Deerfield, thence to Green- 
field, Turners Falls and across the 
"Plains" to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 

50 Miles of Trackage -Modern 
Equipment — Train Dispatch- 
ing System- Freight and Ex- 
press Service over entire line. 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
Company 



CARS 



Leave AOOIE COLLEOE for HOL- 
YOKE at 45 mln. past the hour. 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST lor AOOIE COL- 
LEOE at 7 and 37 mln. past the hour. 



Special Can at 



Rata* 



MHERST I SUNDERLAND ST. VI. CO 



For a Daily and Sunday Newspaper 
You should Read 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE 



C*fd nly from t A. M. to 4 A.M. 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of M Gold Medal Uniforms. " 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



TUB 

Springfield Republican 

While you are at college in Amherst. 

It haa all orTna M. A. C. Newi 

Tha B*»t Sporting Nawi 

rail General N**« 

A Strong Editorial Paga 

IntaraltlBg Feature* 

It la a Baal Hewapape* 

Duty) 3 cent* 5 7° cents a month ; f 2.00 
a quarter. 
.Sunday, 5 cents; 50 cents a quarter. 

Subscribe by mail or through the Amberst Naw,- 





5 • (MM 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL 



Vol. XXV. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, September 29, >9»4- 



HOLY CROSS NEXT 

OPPONENTS FOR AGGIE 

Hard Game Expected Saturday at 
Worcester with Old Rivals. 



COLLEGE NIGHT PRESIDENT FAIRCHILD 

EXERCISES FRIDAY 1 SPEAKER AT ASSEMBLY 



Commemorating Opening of College 
Forty- seven Years Ago. 



M. A. C. meets Holy Cross in 
their annual gridiion battle on Fitton 
field at Worcester, Oct. 8. For the 
past few years, the game bus been 
one of the best and hardest fought 
ou the M. A.C. schedule. In 1911 
M. A. C. lost to Holy Cross 0-0, in 
11)12 a closely contested game be- 
tween the two colleges ended in a 
6-6 tie. Last year, 1913, saw M. A. 
C. secure a 6-0 victory over the 
Worcester college. The fact that 
both teams have won one game and 
tied one indicates that this year's 
game will be hard- fought, n& both 
teams are anxious to secure the 
advantage game. 

This game should be especially 
interesting this year, us bulb M. A. 
C. and Holy Cross are playing very 
open games, the advantage iu this 
respect lying with Massachusetts, as 
Holy Cross has just taken up this 
style of game, which Dr. Brides has 
beta developing at M. A. C. foi 
three years 

Last Satin day Holy Cross lost to 
Colbv bv a 17-0 score, which means 
that the Worcester boys will work 
all the harder to defeat the Maroon 
ami White on Saturday. The prob- 
able lineup of Holy Cross eleven is 
us follows :— Healy r.e., O'Keefe 
1. t., Haggerty r. g., Brawley, c, 
Lynch 1. g., Cahill, 1. 1. Mullen 1. e., 
Lawless q. !»., Lee r. h. b • McCaity 
1. h. b., Donovan, f. b. 

A large cheering section will 
accompany the team to Worcester. 



President of New Hampshire State 
Gives Interesting Address. 

1„ ,omme.noration of the opening, P™t*leirt K. T. Fairchild of N« 
of thin college on October t, 1M7, Hampihirt «■*■ ****£ £ 

exercises will be held in the form of address at the regular Wednesday 

a college night at Dntpef Hall. Fri- 



day. October -2nd. For the past two 
scars these anniversary exercises have 



BSernbly. The talk was given more 
or less in the form of advice. 

"One of the most Interesting things 



\ cms uiese i«imi\t:i!»i« »"-«■*■•"-»> ••-""- . ,. ..full, 

J ... .Ji. I'll our country is the wonuei iull\ 

been held In the chapel, but the appro saoatou coumrv > 

. ., , , ,, ,' 1 imiiwit'enioiis people. | lie sciiooi 

in-iuteiiessof the date this yea. canned liomo n eni . { , .- , 

1 , , ... 1 ri avatem is the same In all sections ot 

the facu Itv to adopt this plan IW ■veiem M **» 

W , ,• ... , the country, as are all other things 

usual college night program will lie uu ""»»• 

, ., . i- 1 1 ;.i..,,t Uni common to the nation. 

foi owed, over winch President Hut- - 

„.. 1 "The pena tv of voutli i> to be sa- 

terlicld w preside. 1 he speakers l ' •, , • I 

;' .... , , .. .... lv rlaed. Lots of advice Is as g las 

of the evening will include the follow- r» ,E " 

.1 tartin 11 u, .1 .... new, it has never been used befote 

nil men: Hon. William 11. BOW&ei . ... 

b „ . l. t .1 i; . « we are at this lime full ol high 

71, of Boston, a member of the Inst Hl 
, " , lf ,, ,11,.,,,.. ambitions and determination*. im* 

c ass that graduated from the college 

„ t ■ ., v .-. _* power to stay thru the semesters wort 

Mr. Arthur 11. Norcross, <1, <>1 1 • . 

f . , - determines whether or not we have 

Monson, another member of the oi«i- 

f »ha .iul.t of 1hc grit to complete our chosen task. 
est class, and one of the eight «»' fe , , , i,..,. n,„u .. 

... xiie new school teacbei tm<is a 

Aegis's famous crew ; Mr. Arthur I ,.,„„,,.„.., ,,. .,.h..i„s ^ 

Uonaha.., V> ; of W ;i ,!.,^, ,. L.C, ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ 

!im ...nhcroftl.elt,.rea..ofLducat,on. ^ 

Mr Charles 11. White '09, of I s - "^us us. 

; , T« ,, p A*t\ .... II -ntlicuiit. the real test is to run the 
britlge ; and Mr. George P. * » Donncll 

. *7 . 1 • . r ,i... entire race 

of Northampton, who is one of tlic 



trustees of the c«>llege. Besides the 
speaking there will be some music 
furnished by members of the college 
musical clubs. 

I'.arlier the same day there will be 
held a meeting of the Board of 
Trustees of the college. 

Dr. W. H. Jordan of the New 
fort Agricultural Kxperimcnt station 
of Geneva, who was scheduled to 
speak at the Wednesday sseemblv 
will be unable to be present and his 
place will be tilled by Professor Frank 
A. Waugh, who will probably give s 
talk on < Jermanv. 



SECOND TEAM WINS FROM 
FRESHMEN 
( )n Saturday morning, Ac Second 
team defeated the Freshman eleven 
on Varsity Field by a score of 7-'i. 
(Quarterback Murphy made the sole 
touchdown of the game, on a 30- 
yard run through guard. The game 
was uninteresting, except at inter- 
vals. The second team was slowed 
up considerably by the fact that 
some of the men were new recruits 
and did not know the signals, but, 
despite this managed to outplay the 
freshmen consistently. The fresh- 
men played a game of a very medi- 
ocre type, Babbitt being the only 
man on the freshman eleven who 
made any gains. It Is to be hoped 
that the 1918 team will improve 
before the Williston game on Oct, 3. 



CLASS ELECTION 



••We are peciiliailv fortunate in liv- 
ing in an age when the arts and 
ackttOU are revolutionizing life. 
Professions are developed to a high 

degree. Agriculture is practically s 
„ew hook, but is regarded as an 
essential science. Today as never 

before everj man is brother tO e\e>\ 
other man. 

••The great war going <»n among 

the other great countries of the world 

Is a challenge to civilization. Chris- 
tianity itself is broken down. Don't 
let vour faith be disturbed. More 
people than ever before regard war 
as hideous and barbarous. 

"The people should be proud of 
America and her stand. The young 



At a meeting held Wednesday af- 

, .„,- , , .. men here are ealleu to education. 

tornon the c ass of 1917 elected the "" " „ , . 

ternon, tue ciass 1 , ,, tlu , v an . ,.. llk .,| lulo ,. UIU| „ 

follow ue oil leers and managers foi » ■ 

loiiowing uiiiw. „.",,,. lo U-arn the art of destruction. I lure 

ihp first semester : President. Uicl.- , . 

me nrsi si mem, eoUegM here to inspire one to 

aid W. Smith of Pitlslield ; vice- - lie *-»-B ■ 

. , , „ , , f v ,;, l- • all that makes to the beat in man ami 

ores dent. Oswald Behrend of Natiek , , •"' 

pieBiut.Hu „. the welfare «.f the community. We 

aecretarv, Fred Mather of 1 auntoii ; ; "•«- • 1, 

treasurer, Linnoln I). Kelsey of West 
Hartford, Conn. *, class captain, 
WUHam Bradley of GfOtOH ; scrgeant- 
Ml-nrms, Piuil U. Squires of Belcher- 



indeeii lucky. We have a right 
to feel except loiiallv proud. 

••Failure Of sUeOtsi here and in tin- 
rest of life cannot be determined bv 



■ . ,, .. I our successes or failure* In the things 

town; historian. Walter (.. Buetm- ^ ^ ^ We u „ wjU|t lo ,,„ 

nan of Chicopee. fa (mr mUu] 

Lewis Bnckinan was elected mana- """» . 

,„ « , ,. not be true success. If one is to 

eer of footbal ; A. W. Spaulding. " ol ,,e , , . 

ger 01 luoiu , 1 b ,j !-ll( . € . l . l . l . |„. uiustbegentlemaii- 

„f basketball P. R. Babco< k of 



cross-country; and H. A. Pratt a 
member of the Class Athletic Board. 



1 v and pol i t e . It ta kes great COO ra ge . 

[Contirmed «n pag* 31 



No. 3 

TEAM LOSES OPENING 

GAME AT HANOVER 

Palmer's Field Gouls Only Score 
Against Dartmouth's 29 Points. 

M. A. C. was defeated 'ii'-C t>) 
Dartmouth on the tlreen's home 
ground last Saturday in the opening 
game of the season for both teams. 
Palmer's two held goals, which were 
features of the game. Retted the six 
points for Massachusetts ; while 
touchdowns by Whitney, Teller, 
Ghee and Cannon gave Dartmouth 

the game. The New Hampshire 

team's Kiiperior weight and longer 
Sanson <>f practice were factors that 
gave her the heavy balance of the 
score, hut she found the Maroon 
and White a hard proposition to 
handle and had l<» tight her best 
every moment of the game. Although 
defeated, the M. A.C. team showed 
pleating light and team work, and 
the outlook foi a Successful season is 

mi-, bright* 

lii the fir*t quarter the Maroon 

could not he stopped. Her plunges 
were Irreaistable, and fust downs 
were steadily mad*. Finally, after 
I very few minutes of play. Palmer 
booted » pretty goal from the field. 
! In the early part of the second quar- 
ter, the ball again approached the 

Dartmouth goal and Palmer kicked a 
s.cond goal, even prettier than the 
Bmt. The little nucleus on the M . 
A. C- bleachers went wild and the 
Green Motion were glum indeed. 
Mut soon M. A. C. was repeated I. 
penalized, giving Dartmouth Ural 
downs, and finally Whitney, captain 
of the Green, tore olT n long run and 

a touchdown. After that Dartmouth 

had slight advantage for the whole 
game. She seemed to gain slowly 
but steadily. Before the end of the 

1 half, Telfer had scored as a result of 

'■ m. long forward pass. 

In the early part of the third ipiai- 
ter. aftei gains bv Oboe and Curtis, 
Ghee made a spectacular run around 
M. A. (Tf b'ft end making the third 
touchdown. In the latter part of 

the third quarter the ball got down 

into Massachusetts territory. Pal- 
mer was forced to try I punt. This 
was blocked. icsMiltiiig in a safety, 
and the ball went back in play on the 
•20 yard Ha*. 1" the fourth quarter, 

alter steadv gains bv Whitney and 
Garrish, Cannon made the Inst touch- 
down of the game around left end. 

A good number of M. A. C men 
i went to Dartmouth to see the team 



The Mr-rH^l^"' Tuesda y- 5cpt * 9 ' ' 9 ' 4 ' 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Sept. 29, 1914. 






I 



play. In numerous cases, "sWa-door 

pellmans" were pressed Into •errlee. 

Among those who made the trip were 
LeDue, Earrar, Pike. Moore, Grant, 
Wright, Hildrcth, Fitzgerald. H. 
K.gers, Claude, Russell, O'Brien, 
Hmnes, Kstes, Fisher, Moses, Top- 
ham', Huntington, Kttboe, Hall, 
Bicker, Rutter, DnfleU, Fielding, 
Rogers, II. Bishop, Nicholson, An- 
drews, Everbeok, Sturtevant, Stuck- 
|)()le , U()S> . Cuss, Birchard. 
Edwards, Bradley, Ssater, Kirkham, 
Mack and Booth- 

The game, play bj phiy : 

lilt- I Vl MMKK. 

M. A. C won the toss and Dart- 
mouth kicked off to her against the 
wil „l U) the Sfi yd. line. I'ahne. 

panted and M. A. ('• recovered the 

ballon Dartmouth's 10 yd. line. A 
successful forward pass was worked. 
Next there was no gain. Then .John- 
son made •'• vds ami Palmer made 
fust down. The next two plata 
netted hut little gain, and the next 

was an incomplete pass. Then l'al- 

mer drop kicked a successful field 
goal. Score il-0. 

Dartmouth kicked, the hall going 
outside. On the second kickoff. 
PlaUted canght the bail and ran .t 
Ul , 1:, yards to the S3 yd. line. Darl- 
ing gained 5 yds. Johnson made S 
yds. Small gaia through center. The 

next was a punt to Ghee on her JO 
yd. line. Curtis kicked to the M. A. 
C. 4fi vil. line. 

M. A. C. made two good gam > 

through 11.- - B*nd part of tne line 
and then a 15 yd. penalty was given 

for holding. Talmer punted out of 

hounds and the ball was put into 

play near Dartmouth's !•'. yd. line. 

Curtis made a gain of ■ couple of 
yards. M. A. C. was again penal- 
ised ><>' holding. Dartmouth fum- 
bled and sf. A. C recovered the ball. 

Darling made a gain of s yds. 
around left end. The,, after a sub- 
stantial increase by Palmer, John- 
son made firsl down. A successful 
forward paw to Darling followed. 
Then a successful pass went to l'lais- 
ted and the quarter ended with 
Darling making a ft yd. gain. Score 
M. A. C. 3, Dartmouth 0. 



Spears replaced Cotton at right 
tackle. Palmer kicked off for M. A. 
C and Whitnev was downed on his 
to yd. Hue. lasted recovered a 
fumble, but since some one was off- 
ride, the ball went back to Dart- 
mouth. Ciutis gained o yds. Mur- 
doch gained 8 yds. through center. 
Curtis made first down. Dartmouth 
WM penalized 10 yds. Whitney 
lne d 5 yds. and later made first 
down. Mmdock was tackled for a 
la,.. Wiuship missed a forward 

pass. Teller caught a forward pass 

; in(l made touchdown. Successful 
goal. Score 13-6. 

Palmer kicked off to (dice and 

j ordoo tackled him *>n «■ * yd. 

lintl Dartmouth punted to Johnson 

on his 30 yd. hue. 

Johnson made two good gams but 
Palmer had to punt to the Green s 

; , > .". yd. line- 

Curtis tore off ■ * >'* 1 ' 



-i.< <»m. orAli-TEH, 
Merrill replaced Colby at right 
guard. Palmer failed to gain. 
Johnson gained well. Palmer now , 
kicked another field goal. Score 6-0. 
Dartmouth kicked off to Massa- 
chusetts, and Ihirltng advanced the 
hall to the 3<t >d. line. Darling lost 
on an end run. No gain in the next 
play. Palmer punted to Dartmout h's 
« yd, line and they ran it to the 
M. A. C 45 yd- Hue. 

Whitney made 8 yds, The quar- 
terback gained through center. M. 
A. C. got an offside pen sit y of 5 yds. 
Murdoch made a couple of short 
gains. M. A. C. was penalised 
again, making first-down for Dart- 
mouth. Ghee made a short gain. 
Whitney made a touchdown around 
his right end. No goal. Score 8-6. 



Curtis tore off « » ><■• 

Whitney carried the ball for •' yds. 
M A C. was penalized for being 
ofl .„de. An incomplete pass to left 
end closed the first half. Score 
Dartmouth 18, M. A. C. 6. 

THIRD «,» MMKi:. 

Win-hip came back into the game. 
Thielscher came in fullback. 

M A C. kicked oiT to Whitney, 
who 'ran the ball up well. He later 
Mdnedfiyde. Then Dartmouth was 
penalized' 5 yds. Curtis advanced 

the ball -i vds. Whitney made I 

good gain. Thielscher gained 3 yds. 

Whitnej made a 25 yd. run. Ghee 

UjadeaC yd. gain around left end 
and was "knocked out. Spear 

opened up a good hole for Curt* 

Ghee next made a brilliant run 
„ rinlll dM. A.C. left end making a 
touchdown. Six points. Coal suc- 
ful. Score 20-6. 

Dartmouth kicked off to M. A. < 

cleM t(( lhe goal line. Darling made 

a •hort gain. Grayson replaced 
jotoaon. Two more geJm wars 

made under the goal posts. 1 almei 
acceded in a good punt to Ghee who 
was tackled in his tracks on the N. 

A. C 30 yd Hoe. 

( ;hee made a long run around 
rightend and fumbled, Schlotterbeck 

recovering. Id a minute Dartmouth 
recovered on a fumble. 

Dartmouth gained 5 yds. ami was 
penalised 8 yds. Curtis made a 
long gain making first down. No 
gain bv Ghee through left tackle 
Dartmouth fumbled and the ball 
went to M. A. C on her A yd. line. 
Apuntbv Palmer was successfully | 
b^ked, resulting in a safety. Score 

22-6. , an 

The ball resumed play on the m 
vd Hue and after a vain attempt by 
•„ ar li tl g, a punt was sent down to 
Ghee and the quarter ended with 
&e ball on M. A. C's 40 yd. Hue. 

FOURTH tjUAHTKK. 

Dunn replaced Perry. Hitchcock 
replaced McAuliffe. Incomplete 
pass. No gain on a plunge. Punt 
bv Curtis. Long punt by Palmer. 

'Seven vd. gain by Curtis. Sub- 



stantial gain by Whitney. Dart- 
mouth was penalized twice for being 
offside. Ghee made a left end run 
and was downed by Darling. Illegal 

forward to Talfer. First down b 3 

Whitnev. NO gai'i by Thielscher. 
Garrish replaced CnrUs. First down 
by Whitney . Ga rrish gained through 
center. Cannon replaced Whitney. 
Btims replaced Teifer. Burns re- 
placed Winship. Touchdown by 
Cannon around left end. Spear 
kicked goal. Score 29-6, 

Comiskv replaced Ghee at quarter. 
Barrows replaced Smith atleft guard. 
Dartmouth kicked to Plaisted 
who was tackled by Cannon. The 
next play was an Incomplete pass. 
Next Dartmouth caught Plaisted's 
pass. No gain by Corntsky. Punt 
by Dartmouth went outside. Long 
gain by Johnson. Gain by Darling 
around left end. Fumble ami Dart- 
mouth recovered. 

M. A. C. got the ball again and 
.Johnson made first down. Another 
attempt resulted in no gain through 
center. Incomplete pass. At- 
tempted punt but had to make 
another incomplete pass. Palmer 
D ext punted U) Dartmouth's 80 yd. 
line. 

Garrish made a gain of 5 yds. 
Dartmouth punted and Melican 
dropped the ball and Baxter recovered 



for Dartmouth, and then the game 

ended. 

The lineup : , 

Teifer, Films le re Pitted 

McAulitie, llitchcock.lt rt.SchloUerbeck 
Smith, Barrows, Ig IS. Jordon 

c. Dole 
Milmore. c 

Cotton, Spear, rl "»' 

Winship, 15urns,re le.Day, Higgmho ham 
/• i ,h ab, Mehcan 

Ghee, Conusky, m» q "* .. 

Whitney, Cannon, Ihi, rhb, Darling 

Curtis.Cairish.rhb Ihh, J..hn,<,n,t.«ayson 
Murdoch, Thielscher, (b fh. 1 ^lmer 

Score Dartmouth 29, M- A- C. ■ o. 
Touchdowns-Whitney, Ghee, letter, 
Cannon. Coals from touchdowns-Curtis 
, Spear, Coals from field- Palmer 2. 
Umpue-O'lHien of Tufts. Referee- 
Fred Murphy of Brown. Head-hnesman 
_Hugh MacCrath of B. A. A. Lines- 
men-Moses and Teifer. Time-. 5 mm- 
ute quarters. 



William Thayer '17, Harvard 
ex-T6, of Somerville, has pledged 
Lambda Chi Alpha. 



FOR 6000 "EATS" 



Go to- 



86 PLEASANT ST. 

Mrs. J. K. W. Davenport 



You win $500 m 

by writing the best >M 
Fatima ad. 



WelH-lievi- theColW.- Man *lnsn.oke« 
FHtmm oujrf.t to iH-r.i.U. to «...< ircK-i 
Koiu.a ad. He known Iron, exptrfenc* 
ttel F:.t.m.-. isof M,hsfxim: -xe « h-'"^ 
H,, for it! mi T htI:.Iivo .,!.:. I»N t » 
modemtely »nc«l. H- of «" * «"' a 
smok.-rs. should be aUC to » rite Of 
l-'atimii eonvinemgl) . 

Sowe B rep,^npt"I«^■'•."<'«<"^'••f," 1 , ;;';; 
who prepares und mho. to tw t»» , '" -« 

ruttes lK-forr June 1, U»l*. 

Any itudent o* any couege may compete tor 

SL nre no r,,UU«.on S ^X^v^^on?^ 
College We wnnt a studciif-noi a pron-»= 
.nnount-od h', -r. v. 11a t Mjnflge*. 

$5 ftr every ad pab&M 

$!?lfj far t^s b»t 0=« submitted 
3a« W 4 J ' " T , vll „ , rv »,,,,t. On- 



lnu'i 



- 1 |)| j Burn 

^ , Will V: 

I i> mnnrr t> <• v. nt-r niti«t »«- 

, in l!i' li'vi- in I'm I roduct lie is 

puUwlW«L wnlingiUiout. 

^jff^^C zHZ FrfthAvi u, New York 

Jr%.m ml 




Somo fact* that 
ma y help y*l 

c . ttn ,, wi-r* fliw 

i In 
The I 

• f ,„ « He m 



F.Um* . Ci f"f"?.*l, J& 
"cUrtincthrely um1i» ««" 

Tfcey «re 20 for ISe 





THE TURKISH BLEHD CIGARETTE 



1905 CLASS DIRECTOY 
K. L. Adams, 62S0 Btttegasse 
avenue, Oakland, Cat. Professor 

farm management nud assistant pro- 
fessor of agronomy in university of 
California, Ilerkeley, Cal. 

G. H. Allen, San Fnincisoo, ( al. 

With H. M. Newhall & Ck»., New-| 
hall building. 

II . L. liarnes, luterlakeu. Stock- 
bridge. Farmer. 

F. A. liartlett, 570 Maud itreet, 
Stamford. Coun. President and 
treasurer of the Frost & liartlett Co., 
vice-president Oasis Farm & Orchard 
Co., Rob well. N. M. Hditor and 
publisher of 7W Talk. 

C. E. Brett, 84 Bayard St., New 
lirunswick, N. J. [nstrnctor in 
poultry husbandry, EUitgeri college. 

K, C. Bruce, 16 Avon street, Clif- 
tondale. Plumber. 

C. M. Carter, Bane. Florist. 

II. Di Crosby. Definite address 
unknown, (irobably at Hutland. 

Esther C Cushman, 21 Urown 
street. Providt-nce, R. I. Assistant 
Ammary Brown memorial. 

J. J, Gardner, University <>f Illi- 
nois, Urbana, HI. Associate in 
pomology. M. S. Iiiiversity of 
Illinois. June, 181 I. 

Ralph P. Gay, 316 Fast Front 
street, Phiinfield, N. .1. Tree 
surgeon. 

W. U. Hatch, 185 Soiithworth 
street, West Springfield. Golf 

oonrse construction at Chestnul Hill. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 

('. S. Holeoinb. 101 Kim street, 
Wollaston. Teacher of rolce at 
Carry School of Expression, Copley 
square, Boston. 

Thomas Francis Hunt, 2Il".i (hnn- 

oing W:iv. Berkeley, Cal. Assistant 

superintendent agricultural exten- 
sion, University of California. 

Frank F. Hatchings, Lynn. With 
(ienerul Klectric (<•.. engineering 
department. 

Raymond K Huntington, 140 

Sixth street. Cambridge. Adv.-i th- 
ing manager Aldcn Kpeare'i Sons 
Co , assistant treasurer Attack 
Prem, secretary Pilgrim Publicity 
sociation. 

N. D. Ingham. Atascaiierfi, Cal. 
Coiieral superintendent Atascadcio 
ranches, horticultural and agricul- 
tural engineer — 80,000 acres. 

.1. R- Kelton. 8§ Pearl street, 
Amsterdam, N Y. Teacher. 

E. T. Ladd, 101 Cornell avenue, 
Swarthmore, Pa. Batigh & Sons 
Company, chemists, Philadelphia. Pa. 

G W. Lewis, 43 Lymle street. 
Melrose, Farm superintendent, 

Long Island hospital. Boston. 

John K. Lyman, 184# Highland 
street, Columbus, Ohio. Associate 
profesior agricultural chemistry, 
Ohio State university. 

W. A. Munson, Littleton. Man- 
ager Munson & Frost fruit farm. 

E, W. Newhall, Jr.. 2«".o (Califor- 
nia street, San Francisco, Cal. 
Farming, with H. M. Newhall £ Co. 

William J. O'Neill, 11 Grant 



street, Heverlv. Industrial school 



for Deaf and Dumb. Instructor in 

manual training. ; ^lllt S 

(i. W. Patch. 104 Kingston street, j *^** ^ 
Boston. Purchasing agent, Brown 
Durrell Co. 

Paul A. Russell, Market street. 
Belvidere. N. J. Kruit grow. 1 ; 
president Delaware Valley eu-opcra- 
ti\e association; chairman Warren 
county fair committee. 

J.C. Richardson, Mammoth Road. 
Pawtueketville. Truck gardening 
and general farming. 

W. M. Sears, office address, 370 
Main street, Stamford, Coun., home 
address, Kim Place. (Jlenbrook, Conn 
Sales managerof Frost «\ BartlettCo. 
A. N. Swain, 84 I 'Fremont Build., 
Boston. Horticulturist and district 
manager of MuiiHon-Whilaker Co. 

Monica Sanborn Taft, Box '.M. 
Sterling. General farming and frail 
growing on 17"» sere farm. 

Albert D. Taylor, home address. 
2127 Fast 105th street. Cleveland, 
Ohio, business address, 1800 Kuvlid 

avenue, Cleveland. Ohio. Land- 
scape architect. Opened an office lo 
Cleveland, Ohio and in the Paddock 
building in Boston, in March, 1914. 
II. F. Tomson, R. F. I). 1. Attle- 
boro. Market gardener. 

B. Tapper, Venice, Cal. < >wnei 

and managerof dairy farm. 

0. N. Willis, office, 108 Agri- 
cultural Bank building. Pittslicld, 
home address, 167 West Housatonic 
street. Mass. highway commission 
and district engineer in charge of 
Berkshire district of I s town-.. 

L. S. Walker, l!> Phillips street. 
Amherst. Assistant chemist Mass. 
Agricultural experiment station. 

C. L. Whitakcr. ITo Fourth ave- 
nue. New York, N.V.. home addnss. 

84 South Tenth avenue, Bit. Vernon, 

N. V. President Munsoii-Whifakei 
Co . forest engineer. 

F. L. Yeaw. Boswell. New Mex- 
ico. Manager Oasis ranch, general 
managerof Onsis fat in and Orchard 
Co. Inc. and member of board of 
directors. 




For Young: Fellows 



The young college man or 
any wide-awake young fellow 
enjoys wearing the clothes that 

have life worked into them. 

We've established a reputation 
for havino the thino-. 

Yminjr men who want live 
clothes come heir for them. 

The Hart Schaff ner& Marx 
The A. B. Kirschbaum Co. 

There ;iiv none better. 

Theie are many smart and 
beautiful new fabrics this fall. 
The tailoring is along English 

lines. 

Our prices are never high. 



c A. S. K Co., 1414 



Suits at $15, $17, $18, $19, $20, $22, $23 and $24. 
Cheaper Suits if you want them i $10, $12, $13, $14. 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



ASSEMBLY 

rContiniti"! from page i] 



NOTICE ! 

Twenty-five cents will be put in a box for tbe 
NEW ATHLETIC FIELD every time you 
buy shoes at our store costing $3.50 or over. 

VRRV t , \T F.ST ST V I , I s . 

Shoes for the Drill- 82.50 to $5.00 

aK©'» SH3.c>« Stor< 



School and College Photographers . . . 



Temptation comes in such forms that 
one may not be :ible to withstand 
them. Every day has its temptation 
to overcome. 

'*We are here to perform a life of 
usefulness. We all want to he of 
service to the rest of the world. 
The greatest thing one can do is to 
help a fellow matt. We go out from 

college to And a Joh. Whether we 

fulfill a higher responsibility remains 
to be seen The difference between 
an educated man and an uneducated 
man is the difference between the 
living and the dead. He leaders in 
row community and make the fight 
as if voti were full of red blood. 
The world needs leaden more than 
ever. 

"Defeat makes men invincible. 
Failure is the linal test of persistence 
and a strong man. No one is a 
failure who is honest and true. 
Theie is no cause for failure if one's 
purpose is right. There is only one 
failure — to be false to the best that 
is in ns.** 




LOO ALLY: S 2 Center St., Northampton. Mass., 

and South Hadley. Mass. 



Main Offmk 

1546-1548 Broadway. 

New York City 



Theie Studios offer the \m&l skilled 
artiM« itiil most complete 

equipment obtainable 



My Fall and Winter Woolens and Gents* Furnishings 
Are 2^o-v*» Complete 

A very nobby line of evervihine in suits and oviree»4« All the latent fiihtens, 

FULL DRESS ^UITS FOR RENT 
U.- do Dyeing. Cleaning;. Altering and Pfestl | at UdjeVsmJ f>nl»- i.arments. 

1 sjivr my ' -'in. 1 1 itti ■ 

f AHROVITZ, ii Amity St.. Attirieriit. Tel jot-W 

THE LEADINO TAILOR 

JACKSON & CUTLER 

, OBAI'RR" in 

Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 




The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Sept. 29, 1914. 



TliK MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 
FRANK W. BUELL 'i?. Editor in-Chief 



Managing Editor 
Assistant Editor 
Athletic Editor 

Athletic Editor 



TYLER S, ROGF.RS'i6, 

HENRY H, WHITENS, 

JAMES A. PRICE '15. 

E.SUMNER DRAPER 'IS 

THOS. L. H ARROCK"* 'i6, department Kflitm 

ALFRED A, GIOIOSA'ii C.itnpus Editor 

FRANK \ . S JUKI' KEI.K. \liimni Editor 

M1LFORD R LAWRENCE '1?, 

Associate Editor 
RICHARD W. SMITH *ir. Associate Editor 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

MA I' RICE J. CLOUGH '15, Business Manager 
CHAS A. HUNTINGTON. J K.'i6, 

Assist int Business Manager 
W. RICHARDS! lftS*IS Advertising Man'g'r 
LESTER E. FIELDING 'i6, Ass't Adv. Mgr. 
U1RGER R. ROSEQUlST'lf, Circulation 



directly us the Bomber of games that 
the team wins. Hut games won is au 
impossible manner of stirring Up 
enthusiasm in these non-athletic 
oigaQizatkmi and consequent!; thev 
struggle along by the efforts of a few 
heroic members. 

Non-athletic activities are a great 
asset to a college and when they are 
well established here at this college, 
they will go their way on their own 
responsibility- Suitable offices and 
faculty interest will go far towards 
securing this fundamental establish- 
ment and will insure their future 
development. 



Subscription #1.50 per year. Single 
copies. 5 cents Make all orders payable 
to Maurick J. CLOUGH. 

Entered ei eerond-c'nse matter at the Amhertf 
Peet 0«tee. 

Vol. XXV. Tuesday, Sept. 29. No. 3 



Tiik plans of the Faculty and the 
Trustees of the eollegr in regard to 
the use of the Dew Agricultural build- 
ing, now under construction, are 
unknown to the CoiAKOIAE but we 
take the liberty of offering advice as 

to the disposition of the ground floor 

of North college if the departments 
now occupying offices then an- to • >«.' 
moved to the new building. 
The Collegian offers a plan that 

would throw tin- entire ground floor 

into office* to* the non^thlettc organ* 
izations of the college. The present 

ollice of the (oi.i.m.i an would be 
retained fOT the use Of that organiza- 
tion alone. The large room across 
the hall, now utilized SI an oilier. 

could be the Senate meeting room, or 

if passageway COUld be made tO lead 
to the Social union room thif office 

could be used as the Trophy room. 
The present Trophy room would 

undergo the most radical change 

being divided up Into f small 

Offices. If the room, tha' was in this 

plan, original!} set aside for the use 

of the Senate should be used :i«. t In- 
Trophy room the Senate would have 
one of these four smaller offices for 
their sole use. Musical clubs and 
the Roister Dototari would occupy 
another room. The fresf club and 
the current year's ludrx Hoard could 
make use of a third while the demands 
of theY. M. C. A., here at college 
would be met with the fourth office. 
Such a plan would acuotntuodatc 1 
considerable number of organisations 
It would be far better than the pres- 
ent lack of office* m the crowded 
condition of the ( <>i,u:<,i\,\ offices, 
which are used jointly with the Senate 
and several other organiEations. 

Whe'i we realize, the outlay at other 
colleges for these activities, such a 
plan as this does not seem extreme. 
Here at college, the student body, as 
a whole, have at best but 1 half 
hearted interested in athletics and 
their enthusiasm In an athletic team 
representing lbs college varies 



UNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

k kg it. au eroroAV sebvick at 7 p m. 



Tiik old adage about the bird in 
the bush may well apply to the stu- 
dent body of this college in reference 
to the proposition to change the 
importance of linal and mid-year 
examinations. Their bird in the 
bush was 1 petition laid over a year 
ago before the faculty requesting 
that final examinations be placed on 
a different basis, so that a failure to 
pass the long and difficult examina- 
tion would not in itself mean failure 
to puss the course The bird is £ RTJSSELL NORTON 
likely to remain where it is for some 
time unless a stone or two is thrown 
at it. It is not necessary U) repeat 
here the arguments in favor of this 
change, indeed they are almost self- 
evident, especially to any one who 
has been through I few such ordeals. 
That the student body approves of 
the measure is undoubted, and the 
members of the faeulty ^eein to favor 

it also let us hope" that the wish Best Quality Pennsy Ivaiiia Coal 

of the students will be considered, 

and that the petition may bring 

material results before the February 

examinations; may the bird COffiC 
into their hands. 



AGGIE MSN 

Require Good Stationery 

IllQUire of anyone where to obtain it, and 

Acquire what you need when you correspond — that is 
A Quire of the "Adams' Special 45c a quire" 

Paper that sells elsewhere for 60 cents and more 

GET IT AT 



ADAMS', 



The REXALL Store 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 



SALKS At. KM 



Davenport Miller 
Vein Coal 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

'ices for tins column should be dropped In 
the C<>i i i >;i \n otliiv or handed to Alfred A 
QUmom' e'\ on or belort* the Saturday preceding 

•■ 11 li issue. I 

Sept. 80— MO v. m.. Assembly. 1)i- 
rectoc W. 11. .Ionian. Agri- 
cultural Experiment station. 
< otieva. N. Y. 

Oct 1— 8-80 ■•• m.M. A. ('. ( . A. 

ID ehapel. 

3— Football, Holy Cross at 
Worcester. 

6— 7-0i» p. M ., Stockbridge 
Club in South College, 

7 — 1-1 1» i». m . Assembly. 
Prea. JCenyon L. Butterfieid. 

Mass Meeting. 



BOSTON OPTICS 

85 Water St. 



M W YORK OFFICE 

1 Broadway 



Oct. 



(let. 



Oct. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

CURRAN & DYER, Prop*. 

Loose' Leaf Note Books and Fountain 
— Pens— 



MODERN REPAIR DEPT. 



E.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOEMAN 



E. E. MILLETT 
JEWELER and OPTOMETRIST 

Lenses ground while you wait 

College Jewelry 

Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and Guitar Strings 

AMHKRKT, MA&g. 
Next to Post Office. 



Amherst 



CO - OP LAUNDRY 

High-Grade College Work 



Shirts, 
Collars, 
Cuffs, • 
Plain wash. 
Same, rough dry, 

DRY CLEARING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, #1.50 a Suit 



10-15C 

2 I-2C 
2 1-2C 

48c per (loz. 
30c per doz. 



R.T.fnoST.ABent; D. Shekinvan, As»t. A^ent 
l'ty our ticket system 

Put full name and address on laundry 



INFORMAL COMMITTEE 

At Weflnesil.'iv Assembly an elec- 
tion waa held for the informal com- 
mittee which cons i sted of Ave seniors 
end three juniors. The elected sreil 
Herbert II Archibald, William li. 

(Hears. Daniel J. Lewis, chairman; 

: W. Kennedy, Klvin L. Wright *lo ; 
Frank A. Anderson, Charle* A, 
Huntington, James T. Nicholson '1U. 

1 At a meeting during the week it was 

1 decided to hold the lii'Ht informal of 

Ithe vear on Oct. 10. 

I 



"The Sap of the Soil" 

We frequently hear farmers speak of the "sap of the soil" — a 
phrase which expresses a great deal. All cultivated plants take up 
their food in dilute solution. The sap of a tree or plant circulates 
throughout its system of trunk, branches and leaves, carrying with it 
the nourishment necessary for its upbuilding, as does the blood in ani- 
This sap has been absorbed from the soil through the roots of 



Ml. I s 



the plant, and is charged more or less with plant food ingredients 
which were either applied in a soluble form or were rendered soluble 
through bacterial action in the soil, or through the digestive process 
which takes place in contact with the roots of plants. Manure or com- 
mercial fertilize! s enrich the sap of the soil by supplying additional 
quantities of available plant food. Bacteria, as we have seen, help to 
break down the organic forms of plant food and render them soluble 
for the sap of the soil to absorb. 

Study the Plant Food rrobltm. 
Can we help you f 



BOWKER 



FERTILIZER COMPANY 
43 Chatham St., Boston 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Sept. 29, 1914. 



The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

Jobbers o( Wrought Iron and Brass Pipe, Valves 
*nd Fittings for Steam, Water and Gas, Asbestos 
and Magnesia Boiler and t'ipe Coverings, Pipe 
Cut to Sketch, Mill Supplies. Engineers and 
Contractors for Steam and Hot Water Heating, 
Automatic Sprinkler Systems, Boiler and Engine 
Connections. - - Holyoke, Mass. 



IV< - — «. • |--v « « I I'or 



BECKMAN 



H ' > m 1 > ' 



LOW PRICE T ILORING CO. 

SUITS MADE TO OKIH-K 
Suits C 1 -' nr-d- I'ressed and l>u-d All kinds of 
Kepairihu !• r Ladies and Gentien en neatly done. 
High-Crane WOlk bv first cbiss tailor. Work 
called |iit ..li'! delivered, "sell tickets for pressing, 
4 SUITS 1 '>h $1 ;o 

GEORGE KOrOWiTZ, Prop. 

MainStrr*-! Amherst. MaM Sash Hlock 

tin youi way to the Post Oftite Tel. 4.^8 W 



FLEMINGS SH n E STORf 



Northampton 



Fui particular people 

THE ELMS RESTAURANT 

213 Main St., Northampton 

(Ne.ir Atiihei tt Ui linrl 

JQua'ityRj^uran: a: Moderate 
Prices. 

[TRY OUR SPECIALS 

And a la carte service. 

OYSTERS STEAKS CHOPS 
FRIED CHICKEN, ETC. 

Open 6 a. m. to 11 i\ m. 



FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

(irown by the I Inricultural Oept . 

We offer our surplus stock of cut 
flowers and plants at reasonable rates 
to students and faculty. This stock 
is grown in modern houses under 
ideal conditions. Ruses, carnations, 
violets, chrysanthemums and sweet 
peas in season, 

GROWN ON THE CAMPUS 

Telephone SOO 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Everything in Photography 

Including Framing, 
flood work speaks for Itself. 

fash Hlock, Amherst, Mass. 



CAMPUS NOTES 

Kappa Garamu Phi announces the 
pledge of Gilbert W. Rich '10 of 
Hinghatn. 

Ralph G. Kilbon 1916 of Spring- 
Held and Joseph F. Whitney lit 17 of 
Urooklvn, N. Y. have both pledged 
Kappa Sigma. 

Professor McLean has picked 
Moberg, Whitiuore &ml Hurvey of 
19Hfi with J. K. Lewis as alternate, 
to represent M. A. C. Ht the stock 
judging contests of the year. From 
a class of twenty-sis juniors of last 
year, seven men were selected to try 
out this fall. A number of trips to 
various fairs and stock farms have 
been made, and as a result of the 
work done, the above men have been 
selected. They go to Brockton Wed- 
nesday night to enter the New Kng- 
land meet there, and later will com- 
pete in the big show at Chicago, 

STOCKBRIDGE CLUB 
On Tuesday evening, Professor 
Haskell spoke before the Stockbridge 

club about the new plan of organiza- 
tion which will go in effect this year. 
The club was organized about ten 
years ago by Professors Waugh and 
Brooks, in order to give men major- 
ing in different subjects, a broader 
view of agriculture. At that time, 
horticulture had just been made a 
major. For a few years, the club 
grew in size and seemed to carry out 
its function. Lately, however, the 
club was sorely in need of reorgan- 
ization, ilue to the addition of new 
majors. The members and even the 
officers would not attend meetings 
unless the topic concerned their 
majors directly. 

The new plan will take care of all 
this ami prevent any further cliques. 
In the first place, the club will be 
divided into small sections, each sec- 
tion representing one phase of agri- 
cultural work. There will be an 
eves number of sections, either two 
or lour and as the club grows, new- 
sections will be formed. Two of 
these sections will meet every week, 
they being so arranged that any stu- 
dent interested Id more than one line 
of work may attend all the section 
meetings. Every month there will 
be a meeting of the whole club, at 
which some outside speaker will talk 
on some general topic interesting to 
all. 

Besides this there will be the reg- 
ular judging contests in the different 
majors, as was formerly held. The 
college which scores the greatest 
number of points in all the contests 
wins the sweepstake trophy. In this 
manner, each section will be depend- 
ent upon the other, more interest will 
be taken in the club's work, and har- 
mony is sure to reign. 

*T1— Robert W. Lyman has been 
doing advance work in the summer 
session of ths Michigan Univer- 
sity Law School. Mr. Lynmn was 
appointed instructor of law at the 
Dickinson Law School. Carlisle, Pa. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 



Mr. Campion has just returned from England with the 

AQUASCUTUM 

OVERCOATS 

Wells-Margetson Neckwear, Caps & Knitted Vests 

On account of war it will not be possible to gel any more of 
these goods, so an early inspection will be to your advantage. 




Fine Tailoring 



Men's Furnishings 



-See Our Agents- 



Hubbard's BasE Fertilizers 



..i.iW^I'ltfa..,. 



C>BBA*£ 

noNn *» 

OAsE-r^ 




*&iniva&& 



the most economical you can use. 

BetteR crops 



are the inevitable result. 



THE ROGERS ft HUBBARD COMPANY, Middletown, Conn. 

lltHc* Mild Work*, for l hi ml . < 'mm. 



W% J Jl i are supplied every year 

uuroee s deeds dircct to more , Amcri - 

4 can planters than are 

the seeds of any other growers. Do you know Burpee- 
Quality "Seeds that Grow" ? If not, we would like to 
make your acquaintance. Simply send us your address 
(a postal card will do) and you will receive Burpee's 
Annual for 1914, — a bright new hook of 182 pages, which 
is recognized as "The Leading American Seed Catalog." 
Kindly write to-day! Address 

W. ATLEE BURPEE & CO., Burpee Buildings, Philadelphia 



F. A. SHEPARD 

MEN'S STORE 



USE OUR NEW CASH DISCOUNT CARD 
AND SAVE FIVE PER CENT ON 

SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING 

Furnishings and Custom Tailoring 



C&rp*n-ter & Morehous?, 

PRINTERS, 



No i, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mass. 



JK 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday. Sept. 29, 19 14. 



THE 

Hoover & Smith Co. 

616 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 
Diamond Merchants..... 

Philadelphia's Official Fraternity Jeweler 

SPECIALISTS IN 

Fraternity Badges, Fobs, Novelties, 

Rings, Charms Prizes Trophies. 

Medals College Pins, Fobs, Seals* 

Rings, Charms.-. 



<< 



SCOTTIE 



55 



H. HOOPER 

Will (lean and press your clothes so you 

will lie satisfied. It costs no more 

and he is nearer In ''Aggie." 

I.ISIRAI iiiki I BYSTKM 

Under Columbia Cafe 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Now at 13 Pleasant St, 
(ii.uli-.i-' Prescriptions tilled. Broken Lenses 
Accurately Replaced. Fine Watch Repairing 
Promptly unci skilfully Done, 

Satisfaction i.uaranteed 



E. B. DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

I ifcNTAL ROOMS 

WUhanis lit. .ik, Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hours: o to ft a.m., 1-30 to; p.m. 



STEAM l-M'Il-Vi Telephone j<>— I* 

GAS F1T1 IM. I INNING. 

p. W. DANCF. & CO., Plumbers 

Specialty ot Kepairing 

Chukcw Wimmjvvs, Memorial 
Wis'kows, Leah Lights, &c. 



*t Cl'ftnn \vf 



A MHFKST. M -VSS. 



Tl-ltS TEWPSV I'AWLOW 
« 1. iii-mii: ITeaataaj 1: patriae 

Onl.l,.— t 1 •rvt«'»». Ili'»t M «n k |<MWr»1 I'rii-r 

vii wmk wefallv -I'-n.* Wort ilW foi and 

lilivered. ii-ni>' wwr onafa suits tunts am' 
Coats. Ladies' Hpe linen su't*a specialty 
Irani-, trill call every il.iy at M. A. C 

W>l. Kit »M< I IM. I»r<»|». 

v.i>li BPli \n'ii • Tal. No. \%i-t 



Now is the time to be planning fan 



Fraternity Groups 



Have them Liken it 



MISS McCLELLAN'S STUDIO 



44 State Street, 



Northampton Mas*. 



o 



THE 

SMOOTHEST TOBACCO 

FT in the moony night with rape and Velvet 
—that's enjoyment enough for tome of ut. 

Velvet tobacco-fra finest leaf fa this great tobacco 
cnuntry-hung in big warehouses for over 2 yeanr-a 
mellowing process Bapca-bb to *****-£ y . *T* 
Ut!e by Httfc, can change the kaf—eWate toe harsh- 
n«(Vc*«ukbhd). Every pui of Velvet Uk« over 
2 years to produce — no won* 
tier it 'f good. 

^ippMmjKyi u ufe>Wa <js 



Fall Two 

Ounce Tins 



roa 



4c Ct 



W£- 



One ounce bags 5 cents - con venient for cigarette smokers 



FACULTY NOTES 

A very interesting communication j 
written by Dr. Van Suelitelen and 
Ar&O Itano was published in the j 
Journal of the AmsHccm f'/nmii'c! i 
Society for the month of September. | 
The article deals with "the ckctio- 
liti a-iuetric method sod Its applica- 
tion to general analytical chemistry. 

Dr. C. A. Peters, of the chemistry 
department, bat compiled a "Labora- 
tory Manual of Synthetic Agricultural 
( lioini.stry," which he is introducing 
inio some of his courses this year as 
a guide in the preparation of sub- 
stances important in agriculture. 
The material is well arranged and 
clearly explained, and reflects much 
credit on the author. 

Dr. C. K. Gordon, bead of tin; 
department of zoology, has written 
and had published a "Zoological 
laboratory guide and Note Hook." for 
llie dissection and study of a number 

of telelected forms. This guide in 
being used by the zoology classes 
this year and is a great improvement 
over the one used last year 



largest per cent present was in the 
class of '91 which had ten of their 
sixteen men on the campus ; '09 again 
second with half their number at the 
class headquarters. 

Following is the data of all classes 
having over 10 per cent of their men 
ut commencement. 





So, iv 








l 


'KM ( KNT 


Class 


1 i AS9 


H 


i 1X1 




1 1:1 (BUT 


'91 


16 




10 






it.s 


'()!• 


50 




S3 






50.0 


'if 2 


•21 




10 






17.6 


'74 


!l 




l 






tl.< 


".»4 


:io 




12 






10.0 


'13 


90 




;;i 






;i7.s 


'99 


1 1 




I 






28.6 


•(>7 


■)■> 




6 






27.8 


'01 


19 




."> 






26.8 


*1 1 


12 




11 






27.2 


Mi' 


N2 




21 






28.6 






c. 


A. 


1' 


KTKICS 




Sec'y. 


Associfl 


te Al 


uinni. 



CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

Professor Machmer of the facull y 
was the speaker at Thursday even- 
ing's meeting of the Christian ASSO* 
ciation, taking for his suLjeet. 
••Habits". lie told how ea.sv it is to 
ac(pure haluts. either good or bad. 
and how hard it is to change litem, 
Carefulness, persistence, and concen- 
tration are all habits which we would 
do well lo try to cultivate. The talk 
was much appreciated by those pres- 
ent, a large number of them being 
freshmen to whom .Mr. Machmer's 
advice came most opportunely at the 

lieginning of their college career. 

Mi . Sheik announced that within 
the next two or three weeks, group 
,lassi«. would be started, each group 
being under the leadership of SOU* 
professor and meeting with him at 
his home. AU itttertSted were parUe• 
ulnllv urged to join one of tin m- 
group*. 

On Sattmlay the association held ■ 

trek and Lacnn-bat which was MIO 
I ■ -»ful in every way. about f«»i t> fel 
lows making the hike to the Connec- 
ticut river and enjoying the "feed" 
provided by the association. The 
menu was simple, consisting of bacon 
sandwieaes, roast corn and cotlee, 
but the Imivs seemed to be satisfied 
and returned to town in plenty <>f 
time to see the Amherst Hag rush. 
This hike is a fore-niiiner of a series 
of good times thai the Association 
plans to hold dm ing the coming ynr. 



1013 NOTES 
Frederick A. Kentey, farming. 
Buckeye, Texas. 

Samuel 1*. Huntington, farming. 
Grand Isle. Vermont. 

John Lewis I- iseuhaiK r. farming, 
North Rending 

Winford V. Adams, farming. Fast 
Leverett. 

Iluutoii A. Harris, farming. 
Wcthei'slichl, ( oiin 

I tester N. l'easc, farming, Tem- 
pletoll 

stnait D. Ltmsoa, fanning, Grand 
Isle. Vermont. 

Lewis K, Diury. farming. linthiml. 

Hem \ L. Win i ler. S-'18, bank 
teller. 10 State Street, Moston. (Jiad- 
liated from American Institute of 
Hanking. 

Harold I'.. Jenks, x-'i:;, Worcester 
Folvtechtiic Institute 1911. In- 
stitutoi in Civil Engineering, I'ni- 
reraity of Maine. < Irono, 

Hci Lei i ( Rrewei . salesman for 

Honolulu Gas company. Honolulu, 

T. II. 



COMMENCEMENT 1014 

The total number of slunmi ptes- 
ent Inst .lime, a» near as can be deter- 
mined, was 1*7 of which Irfi regia- 
tered. This namhet was considera- 
ble less than laatyeafwnen 190 put 
their names on the book. The larg- 
est number of men back wa« thirty- 
four from M:> the clsSS of *<>'.( being 
second with twenty-five men. The 



iqii NOTES 

Wav from California. •I'm leach- 
ing Knonomic Kutomology and Veter- 
inary Parasitology. 'This is a won- 
derful country, etc." Stanley B. 
Freeborn, Room 201 Agricultural 
Hall. University of California. Herke- 
ley. Cal. or 2800 Kelsey St.. Berke- 
ley, Cab 

Louis A. Webster. "Gentlemen 

Farmer" and 1914 class gift collector. 
Blackstone, Mass, He is waiting 
for checks from everyone. 

*■ 

"Abe" Lincoln, County Agent for 
the New London County Improve- 
ment Lenuiie. Address 20 Shetitcket 
M,, Norwich. Conn. 

< too man lost in the wilds of "little 
Rbody,** "Kid" Howard, Experi- 
ment Station. Kingston, K. J. 
Chemist. 

" Fat" Taylor still resides in Feed- 
ing Hills, as a tobacco farmer. 

"Ned" Edwards, American Mutual 



The Massachusetts Collegian,' 'Tuesday, Sept. 29, 1914. 



OVER 6S YEARS* 
if EXPERIENCE 




Trade Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights Ac. 

Anyone sending a nketrh and dpurrlpt \-<n may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
invention Is probably patentable. Commttnlca- 
tiotu strictly cotittdeiiilal. HANDBOOK oul'nteuts 
»ent free. Oldest acency for securing patents. 

Patents taltan tlirniL-ii Muuu & Co. receive 
tjniiol notice, without c harg e, In the 

Scientific American. 

A handsomely Illustrated weekly. Largest cir- 
culation if any scientidc juurual. Terms, f;t a 
issfi fnur moiitUs, ft. Sold byall new^iii-iilers. 

iyil)NN4Co. 364B -^NewYork 

Unmet OlBee. tfii, V SC, Wasblniitou, D. C. 

Batchelder & Snyder Co. 

PACK Kits. POULT It V URKSSEaS 
ANIJ 111 ITKK MAKKIts. 

WHOLESALE HBUtHS IN 

Beef, Mutton, Lamb, Veal, Pork, Lard, Hams, 

Bacon, Sausages. Poultry, Uame, Butter 

Cheese, Eggs, Beans. 

1 1 ice & 5t ifi i5.55.i7,;q. •> ft 6t Blackstotn- St. 

Boitou, Packing House, Brighton. Mass. 

Natl /« Poultry Dressing Plant, Boston. 

Creameries in Vermont. 



Liability Insurance Co., n0 State St.. 
Boston. 

L Finest Smith, Director of the 
j Colchester Hoys' Club. Colchester. 
Conn. 

All '11 men please write your name 
and address on a post card and send 
either to "Hen" Porter, M. A. C. or 
L. K. Smith, Box 77, .Colchester, 
Conn. Other fellows arc shouting 
for addresses, so let's have them. 



WOOF-WOOF 

Mac, howse your dog? 
Dan, I did, 

Ha-ha, 

And another puppy bit 
the dust. 



01 LAVAL 

as superior to other separa- 
tors as other separators are 
to gravity creaming. 




OIIIKK SEPARATORS ><K1M cleaner 
than I* possible oil the average with gravit\ 
craaming, and tie Laval Cream Separators 
skim as much closei still than other separa- 
tors, particularly under the harder rrondltions 
m cool tnilk, rnnntng lieavy cream or sepa- 
rating ttn> milk of stopper cows. 

OTHER SEPARATORS SAVE THEIR 
cost every fMT, ,1^ ,i rule, m (jravity cream- 
ing, and |)f l.tvil Separators save their cost 
every year orer other separators and last from 
ten to twenty years, or on an average five 
times as Inny as Other separators, 

WHY NOT SOLVE If MOW IN THE 

only sure and safe way possible? If you haven't 
a separator, buy a lie F av;il. If you have a 
pmir separator, ri-pla. e it with a De Laval, 



THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR CO. 

New York Chicago San Francisco 



BAHAB'S INN 

Northampton, Massachusetts 
TWO BLOCKS PROM THE DEPOT 

The hotel where there is comfort (with- 
out extravagance.) More popular 
than ever. 

Special Luncheon 12-2 P. M. 

PRIVATE DININC ROOMS 

A la Cartt Strvlce 

Prom 6-JO to fl P.M. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

*7I. — George H. Kastman, ab- 
stractor and insurance agent of 
Storm Lake, Iowa, reports that during 
the past year he has enjoyed "good 
health and no loafing." 

'71 ■ — L- B. Smead has recently 
purchased an automobile, and has 
been spending the summer at Madi- 
son, Conn, 

*72. — Francis K. Kimball is now 
living at 17 Harvard street. Worces- 
ter. 

ex-'7L — Bruce Scott Zeller is en- 
gaged in real estate business. West 
Washington street, Ilagcrstowu, Md. 
Residence, 502 Summit avenue. 

*75.— (.. II. T. Babbitt, i hicopee 
Falls, is a sis-months' editor of the 
Chicopee Journal^ now edited by 
Frederick Griggs of M. A. C. '18. 

e\-'7'.l. — Edward L. Bass lost his 
right arm in a planing machine. 
Aug. 3, 1914. 

'si.— Henry K. Chapin, 49 Lellerts 
avenue, Richmond Hill. New fork 
city, traveled in Kurope. this summer, 
and observed war preparations in 
France. 

*8i.— a. W. spaulding, contract- 
ing engineer of San Francisco, has 
been erecting important government 
buildings in Hawaii. 

'82, — John E. Wildes of Kvans- 
ton. III., has been elected presi- 
dent of the Nat'l Association of 
Farmers 

'85.— Edwin Allen, 19*8 Baltimore 
street, Washington. 1). C, has l>een 
elected secretary for five years of the 
new section for Agriculture, Ameri- 
can Association for Advancement of 
Science. 

*94. — Ralph E. Smith was elected 
president of the Western branch of 
the American Photo-pathological 
Society. 

'08.— -Born to Mr. and Mrs. II. 
M. .lennisoii, :i son on June 18, 1914. 
II. M. Jennison address, 517 West 
Koch street, Bozeman, Mont. 

'14,^ — L. H, Norton, superintend- 
ent of the plant of the Callifornia 
Res Spray company, at Benicia, Cal- 
ifornia, since August 1. 

*14. — 1„. P. Howard, chemist at the 
Rhode Island Experiment Station, 
Kingston, R. 1. 

*14. — H. D. Lucas, in department 
of chemistry, experiment station of 
the University of Maine at Urono. 

'14.^ — R. S. Bragg is engaged on 
an extensive survey at Hopedale. 




Che Pbeasant 

Bnvits St,, Bmbcrst 

Breakfast, Luncheon, 
Afternoon Tea. 

Dinner if arranged for 
Telephone *?o 

Rooms for Transients. 

I 

t« teachers Exchange 

Of Btston | »o It lyht.jn St. 

Recommends Teachers, Tutors and Schools 



An Especially Uood Commission Proposition — 
Cash f<»r ti".t orders— Article widi u Aitvertistd — 
Cuts down expense In power i l»nt*~-Addte§s 

Kni.inhihini; Sui'fl ^ in . • ■ > \ otli Street, 
PhtUrttelphia, I'a. 



• They're not short-lived 


The 


Jerseys 


& 


lit 1913 eighteen Jur«ef ! 
cows wtre oiiitia.iy tested 
which av ''y d 12 years ( 
.; i.l ; ••ionCis ol are. Their 
>■ milk |. induction 
\ ,-, • "< p . ind*. Average 
! !> , , ( i ouniit. One i 
ol t'l • u ^5 was over 18 
ycu, i > .... 


Langevtty. 

I'roiliuiiu :i 


f ■■-'"' Han ' " r nnomic ' 


TBS »M/Sir I tfVmn rVHTB CttJl 

324 W. Ssd f... N.-w Ve it ' ity J 



MQDRE^S $2?o 



NON-LEAK ABLE 



FOUNTAIN PEN 
Minimize your fountain pen 

troubles by owning a Moore's, d. It is the 
safest, soundest and most dependable pen known. 
Cits strength lies in its very simplicity. Nothing 
finiky to get out of order. 4L You can give your- 
self no better, treat than a Moore's Non-leakable. 
For Sale by Dealers Everywhere 

American Fountain Pen Company 

Adams, l.ushlnft & Fouler. Selling Agents 
1*8 DEVONSHIRE STREET •-: BOSTON, MASS. 



v\ 



% 



^Uj. 



==^ 



E. Frank Coe Fertilizers 

1ftC"7 THE BUSINESS FARMERS* STANDARD -1 Q -I A 
OO/ FUR OVER FIFTY-FIVE YEARS 15714 




L 



Do You Raise 300 Bushels of P otatoes per Acre? 
JNsJHREE hundred bushels per acre is 



nut an unusual yield by any means, 
but did you get it this year ? 
CJIf you were planning to raise 300 
bushels of potatoes to the acre how 
-^ far apart would you space your rows? 

How far apart would you drop the seed pieces in 

the row ? 

•jJHow much fertilizer would VOw use to grow 300 
bushels of potatoes per ucrer How would you 
apply it ? 

•JAre you sure that your seed potatoes are true to 
name and true to type ? 

-QWhat are you doing to prevent "scab,'* and early 
and late blight ? 

■^Did you have a short crop of potatoes because of 
dry weather ? Have you decided how you w ill 
overcome this trouble in the future P 

^All these practical point*, end man? more, are fully covered «■■ our 
new hunk 

"Potatoes: A Money Crop" 

which will be nent free to every potato grower who request* a copy, and 
mentions thta paper. 

fl This hook n written by ■ man who himself hat Had years of experience as 
a potato grower, and who has made a earelul study of the beat method* of 
other growen , 

*Jlf you read this book you will keep it for future reference. It is a "worth 
while" publication 

The Coe-Mortimer Company 

51 CHAMBERS STREET, NEW YORK CITY 



8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Sept. 29, 1914. 



- JOIN THE BUNCH AT — 
EPSTEIN'S TAILORING PARLORS 

N'nw located over poll ojiice. Up one flight 

Pressing and Cleaning a Specialty 

Liberal Ticket System Tel. j6 M 

T. MIBNTKA. 

SHOE STORE 

Shoes Repaired by Machinery 

SHOE SHINE 

1 )pen Sunday from f-ti. On your way to P. O. 



The Highland Hotel 

Corner of Hillnnin and Barnes Streets, three 
blocks from the Union Depot, is a modern hos- 
telry run on the European Plan. It is just a step 
from Main Street, away from the noise and dust 
and yet in the center of the business district. 

Its rooms are well furnished and comfortable, 
having a telephone and hot and cold running 
water in every room. Prices SI and up; rooms 
with bath (single) 91.50 and up. 

Its excellent cuisine and well ventilated dining 
room makes a meal a pleasant memory — every- 
thing of the highest quality, well cooked and 
served in the beM possible manner. 

Stay at the Highland Hotel once and you will 
anticipate staying there again. Music every 
evening. 

D. H. SIEVERS, 



IliKhUml Hotel. 



H}trliigH«-I<l, Mi--. 



STUOEHT FURH1TURE 

BUGS 

CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New Kn- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 

E. D. MARSH ESTATE 




COX SONS 



— AND — 



VINING 



71-74 Madison Avenue, New York 

CAPS AND GOWNS 

Best Materials and Workmanship 

WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

27 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 



ICE CREAM, 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Offers courses of instruction in twenty six teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects : 



Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape GarJening 

Pomology 

Agricultural Chemistry 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairyimg 

Poultry Husbandry 

Economic Entomology 

Microbiology 

Plant Physiology and Pathology 

Agricultural Education 

For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



Joiut Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics, 

M. A. C. Athletic Fie'd Association, 

The College Senate, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tenuis Association. 

Rifle club, 

Roister Doistci s 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Fifteen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Sixteen Index, 

M. A. C. Christian Association, 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference. 

Stockbridge Club, 



FOUNTAIN PENS 

Moore's Swan's 

Waterman's 

Thirty-six dozen pens to select from. 
OUR RULE 



"Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded." 



Philip H. Smith, Secretary 

C. S. Hicks, Treasurer 

E. Towne, Piesideut 

J. A. Price, Manager 

S. Prouty, Manager 

E. F. Clark, Manager 

E. S. Draper, Manager 
II. Bishop, Manager 

R. M. Upton, President 
E. M. Prouty, Manager 
F. A. Anderson, Manager 
II. If. Rogers, Manager 
L. E. Fielding, Mauager 
II. H. White, President 
.1 . E. Harper, President 

F. W. Buell, President 
P. F. VVhitmore, President 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



K-IAIII.IKIIH.I. IHIIU 

St b pbxm Lank Polokk 

MANUPALTUKINd .n.ui.l.l u 

180 HKOADWAY, BfflCW YOHK 

CntJU ANU COLLKCiK 
1'INH ANU K1NC3H <* 

"JOl.I*. HIL.VMH AND HRONZK «M1)A1> 









MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXV. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, October 6, 1914. 



No. 4 



ROISTER DOISTERS TO 

PRODUCE MODERN PLAYS 



I'licreare Seven <iood Reasons whv vou should 
bay your 

COAL 

or 

C. R. ELDER 



Stationery, Newspapers, 
Magazines and Col- 
lege Supplies 

A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer. 



The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Mt., alongside the 
famous Moody Brook battle ground 
to Old heerneld, thence to Green- 
field, Turners Falls and across the 
"Plains" to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 

50 Miles of Trackage Hodern 
Equipment — Train Dispatch- 
ing By stem— Freight and Ex- 
press Service over entire line. 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
Company 



1 
1 



Clestii only from / A. M. to 4 AM. 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of " Gold Medal Uniforms. " 
Z494-X426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 




xv 1 ijii»t vv i)its,,n 

J—|»i-iiivC I (itlilumic 

Containing Prices and M>ies ol 

Base Ball, Lawn Tennis, Qolf and 
General Athletic Qoods — IS OUT 

The Wright & Ditson Base Ball Uniforms 

are better than ever this year. Managers 

should write for samples and prices. 

Catalogue I KI.K to any ml.lrri.. 

wivn.irr 
344 Washington St.. 



COLGATE GAME ONE 



MUSICAL CLUBS PLAN 



OF AGGIE'S HARDEST 



D1TMUK 

Boston, Mass 



CARS 



Leave AQOIE COLLEGE for MOL- 
YOKE at 45 min. past the hour. 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST for AUdlE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mln. past the hour. 

Special Can at Reasonable Rate* 



AMHERST & SUNDERLAND SI. RY. CO 



For a Daily and Sunday Newspaper! 
You should Read 

Springfield Republican 

While you are at college in Amherst. 



It ii. 1- i( i 1 ..1 it..- M. A, C.News 

The it. -t Sporting News 

Foil Oeneral Mittl 

A Strong Kdltorlal Page 

Interesting Features 

It Is a Real Hewspaper 

Daily, 3 cents ; 70 cents a month ; $2. 
a quarter 

Sunday, 5 cents; 50 cents a quarter. 
Subscribe by nail or tfaroafh the Amherst Ni 



Four Productions, Including One Mu- 
sical Comedy, Planned for Season. 

At a meeting held Wednesday 
night by the Roister Doisters, the 
policies for the coming year were 
outlined by Manager Nicholson and 
his assistants. Judging from the 
response to the call for candidates 
made by an unusually large number 
of men, mainly from the two lower 
classes, a highly successful season 
both from the dramatic and financial 
standpoint is anticipated. Manager 
Nicholson when interviewed by a 
representative of the Collegian 
gave the f o l lowing -dis co u r se r ela tiv e 
to the approaching season. 

"The policies of the Roister Dois- 
ters have been greatly changed this 
year. The society has reorganized 
into a closer organization with a 
broader membership. It is planned 
now to run all coming productions 
on a strictly business basis. For 
that reason, the society has decided 
to depart from classic productions 
and spend its efforts in producing 
some of the best and latest modern 
plays. Colleges all over the country 
are doing the Bame thing and the 
results have been even greater than 
was expected. Perhaps the college 
that has made the greatest advance- 
ment in this direction is Dartmouth. 
Last year they had a repertoire of 
'22 of the latest modern plays — WON 
of which had never been produced in 
this country. With these plays they 
were able to make a decided hit in 
New York and, in fact, wherever 
they went. In truth, they had little 
trouble in getting bookings. In 
most cases, societies, schools, and 
even theatrical managers begged 
them to appear under their respect- 
ive auspices. This was far different 
from the old method of playing 
classics to one group of people alone 
where guarantees and audiences were 
so poor that every production found 
the company in debt. Since dra- 
matics of this sort had never been 
hugely aucceaaful, it was snggested 
that the modern drama be taken up. 
It would at least do no harm to try. 
So it waa attempted and success 
greeted the club on every hand, 

"The Bolster Doisters now plan 

to do the same thing. Already over 

70 men have applied for membership 

in the organisation. A lot of good 

[Cottttamsd on p*f* 2 j 



The Team Plays at Hamilton for First 
Time Saturday. 

On Saturday, Oct. 10, the M.A.C. 
eleven plays the husky Colgate team 
at Hamilton, N. Y. in the third 
game of the schedule. This is one 
of the hardest games — if not the 
hardest— on the 1914 football sched- 
ule. Last year the mighty Colgate 
eleven humbled the Yale team at 
New Haven, and this year the Ham- 
ilton team has been living up to her 
previous standard having defeated 
Ohio Wesleyan 40-0 on Sept. 16 and 
Cornell by a score of 7-3 on Oct. 8. 

The Massachusetts team will have 
a hard uphill fight, but those who 
saw the team humble Holy Cross by 
a 14-0 score on Fittou field last Sat- 
urday are confident that the boys will 
put up the hardest sort of a fight to 
wrest the honors of victory from the 
New York college. 

The Colgate team is fast in the 
backfield with a heavy line for the 
defence. Open play is a factor in 
their attack and it was by means of 
forward passes that Cornell was 
defeated by Colgate last Satuiday. 

On the same day. the freshmen 
|.luv their hardest game of the year 
at Worcester — Worcester academy 
l>eing their opponents. The acad- 
emy team defeated lb-own freshmen 
14-0 last Saturday. The light 
freshman team will have a hard time 
of it at Worcester. 



EXTENSIVE SEASON 

Two New Trips Being Arranged. Mr. 
Bland Again Secured as Leader. 

The past two years have witnessed 
decided, rapid strides along musical 
lines at M. A. C. especially as re- 
gards the work of the glee aud man- 
doliu clubs. These are activities 
which offer exceptional opportuni- 
ties to undergraduates to secure with- 
out a great expenditure of time and 
money a musical education which in 
later life will prove invaluable. No 
man with any musical appreciation 
can well afford to miss this chance to 
improve himself in this direction and 
it is with this end in view that the 



STOCK JUDGING TEAM 

During the past week, the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural college slock 
judging team, consisting of Philip 
Wbitmore, Elden Moberg, and Har- 
vey, all seniors, succeeded in captur- 
ing first place at the Brocton fair in 
competition with stock judging 
teams from all the agricultural col- 
leges of New Kngland, This is the 
first time in recent year* that we 
have finished on top at any of the 
larger fairs, having captured many 
second and third places. Besides 
this, the ME, A. C. team fin ished fully 
300 points ahead of the Rhode 
Island team, which was our nearest 
competitor. 

The teams finished in the follow- 
ing order ; 

Massachnsetts Agricultural College. 
Rhode Island State College. 
Connecticut State College, 
Maine State College. 
New Hampshire State College. 



work of the clubs wiU be carried on. 

When interviewed by a representa- 
tive of the C'oli.eoias, Manager 
Andersou said in part: 

••We must have men come out in 
large numbers in order to assure suc- 
tion .vuj. Heretofore the sys- 
tem of elimination lias been made 
use of in creating the clubs and. al- 
though successful to a certain extent, 
it has provoked considerable discon> 
tent among the candidates affected. 
During the coining year there is to 
lie no "weeding out" process and 
every man will be given an equal 
chance to compete for a place in both 
the glee and mandolin clubs as well 
as in the otchestra. When selecting 
the men who are to go on the road 
only those who have proved them- 
selves most efficient will be chosen, 
thus leaving it to each individual as 
|0 whether or not he will travel with 
the organisation. Kvery man will be 
given ample opportunity to prove 
himself worthv and the fact that ex- 
pert coaching will be afforded to all 
should warrant a large showing from 
the student body. 

M The clubs are extremely fortu- 
nate in securing for (hi third con- 
secutive year the service aa coach of 
Mr. John Bland, choirmaster af Cal- 
vary Protestant Kpiscopal Church, 
New York. Mr. .lohn Bland's work 
with the glee club for the past two 
years cannot be given too much credit 
and it is needless to say that with- 
out his excellent direction the college 
would have no glee club or, at moat, 
one of an extremely inferior order. 
Calvary Choir ia recognized through- 
out musical circles as one of the 
finest in America and is without 
doubt the greatest hoy choir in New 



ICont inued 00 page 2 1 



[Continued on page ;1 



HOLY CROSS EASILY 

DEFEATED 14 TO 

Maroon Team Has Little Opposition 
on Fitton Field. 

The Aggie team came through in 
fine style last Saturday at Worcester 
and defeated their old rivals, Holy 
Cross by the score of 14-0. The 
game was well played and clearly 
demonstrated the superiority of the 
Maroon and White players as, with 
one exception, their goal line was 
never threatened while Holy Cross 
waa continually on the defensive until 
the last quarter when Massachusetts 
played a safe game and allowed Holy 
Cross to do the hard work of carry- 
ing the ball. * 

In all departmenSTthe Aggie team 
showed their superiority. Iu the 
open game in which Holy Cross was 
supposed to be well versed M. A. C. 
made six successful forward passes 
out of eight attempted while Holy 
Cross wa a s uc cessful in only two (MM 
of the same number attempted. 

The line for M- A. C showed up 
unexpectedly well as the crippled 
condition of two of the linesmen was 
expected to weaken the team. Big 
holes were torn open for the bftckl to 
go through, however, and l'aliner, 
Darling and Grayson were not slow 
to avail themselves of the chance and 
carried the ball through until the 
secondary Holy Cioss defence could 
hold them. 

The first score came in the second 
quarter. At the beginning of this 
quarter it was Aggie's ball on tin 
Holy Cross thirty-eight yard line. 
After a few plays the ball was given 
to Darling who turned the Holy Cross 
right end and circling across the field 
made a splendid run of twenty-six 
yards landing the ball on the ten yard 
line. Here it was expected that Holy 
Crow would tighten but the line men 
had little difficulty in opening up 
holea through which Grayson and 
Palmer tore for six and four yards 
respectively, George making the first 
touchdown of the year. The goal was 
kicked by Palmer also, making * t • - - 
score 7-0, 

The next aeore came in the third 
quarter when a forward pan brought 
the ball to the Holy Cross 18-yard 
line from where it waa advanced on 
line plunges to the 2-yard line. 
1 Captain Mellcan then went through 
center for the second touchdown. 
The goal waa also kicked by Palmer 
making the final ■core 14-0. 



i 
i 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 6, 19 14. 



A good sized crowd from this col- 
lege was present at the game and a 
large number of alumni from in and 
around the city of Worcester were 
also there to assist in cheering the 
team on to victory. 
The game : — 

Holy Cross kicked to Palmer who 
made a good run back. The ball 
stayed in the middle of the field with 
several fumbles on either side. 
Palmer got off a good punt to Lee 
who ran the ball back. well. Holy 
Cross lost the ball on a fumble here, 
however, and then Aggie started 
down the field for the first score. 

Palmer made ten long yards 
through the center of the line as the 
Brat quarter ended. At the begiuing 
of the second quarter Darling got 
aw:iv on one of his twisting, dodging 
runs. With good interference and 
speed he swung around the end and 
brought the spectators to their feet 
as he dodged tackier after tackier. 
He was finally downed on the 10-yard 
line after advancing the ball 28 
yards. This was the most specta- 
cular play of the day. Cray sou made 
six yards and Palmer on his second 
try added four more for a touchdown. 
Palmer kicked goal. 

Holy Cross again kicked off, and the 
ball was taken well into Holy Cross 
territory. On the fourth down in a 
good position before the goal posts, 
Melican called for a drop kick. 
Palmer fell back and stood ready to 
drop the ball over. The kick was 
hurried, however, and was blocked 
the ball being picked up by Holy 
Cross and ruu to the middle of the 
field. Here the ball was lost to M. 
A. C. Aggie then started down the 
field again but lost the ball on a fum- 
ble. Holy Cross then displayed their 
best playing of the afternoon. Two 
wide end runs and two penalties for 
ofi -side playing gave Holy Cross the 
ball on the M. A. C. live-yard line. 
The line held like a stone wall here, 
however, and Luvvler was caught 
behind his line for the fourth down. 
l'almer punted out of danger and the 
half ended soon after. 

Second half : — 

ML A. C. kicked off to Holy Cross 
who gave Lee good interference on 
his end runs and on three successive 
plays brought the ball to inidrteld. 
Perry recovered a Holy Cross fumble 
here and stopped further gains. 
Darling and l'almer brought the ball 
to the 40- yard line. A forward pass 
l'almer to Plaisted laid the ball on 
the iN-yard line. Darling made 
eight yards, l'almer was held, Gray- 
son made six yards and Darling added 
two more putting the ball on the two- 
yard line. CapteUl .Melican then 
went ihrough center for the second 
touchdown. Palmer kicked the goal. 
Score 14-0. 

M.A.C. then played a conservative 
game and as Holy Cross's attack was 
weak the ball itayed around midfield 
for the final quarter. Several freak 
forward passes were tried by Holy 
Cross but they never brought the ball 



within striking distance of the Mas- 
sachusetts goal line. 

Holy Cross was outplayed in every 
angle of the game. On offensive, 
defensive, secondary defense, inter- 
ference and open work, Massachu- 
setts was the leader and the team 
showed up well throughout. 

The game was somewhat marred 
by frequent points that had to be set- 
tled by the rule book and the warm 
weather slowed the game up to a cer- 
tain extent. The game was well 
played however and the entire back- 
Held played a star game while the line 
were always hard at work. 

The liue-up : — 
m. a. c. HOLY CROSS. 

Higginbotham, Day, le re, Mullen, Healy 
Curran, Danforth, It rt, Cahill 

Perry, Dunn, Ig 

rg, Zimmerman, Morrissey 
Dole, c c, Brawley 

Jordan, Fuller, rg 

lg, Haggerty, Lynch, Hrenan 
Schlotlerbeck, rt It, O'Keefe, O'Connor 
Plaisted, re le, McCabe, Finn 

Melican, Murphy, qb 

qb, Lawless, Mullen, Joyce 
Grayson, Ihb rhb, McCarthy, Dolan 

Darling, rhb lhb, Lee 

Palmer, qb 

f b, Donovan, Wallace, Murphy 

Touchdowns— Palmer, Melican. Coals 
from touchdowns— Palmer 2. Referee — 
McCraih, boston college. Umpire— W. 
H. Hulen, W. H. S. Head linesman — 
Donnelly, Georgetown. Time— Four ten 
minute quarters. 

THE ROISTER DOISTERS 

[Continued from page i] 



material has been found among the 
freshmen and a big year for dramat- 
ics is assured. The club plans on 
one new show which will be taken 
on the Christmas trip. This play 
has not been definitely decided upon 
as yet, but will be announced very 
shortly. It is rumored that an elab- 
orate production is promised for 
Prom, this year and already men 
have been called for a cast that will 
number about 30 characters. The 
commencement show is to be on even 
a more elaborate scale. It will 
probably be Aggie's first musical 
comedy, and already active work is 
being done on it. One other play 
will probably be produced during the 
year for the benefit of those who are 
interested in the heavy drama. The 
society, as will be seen, will attempt 
to cater to the tastes of all. but 
especially to the masses where the 
stage finds its greatest work. 

"The society can use as many men 
this year as will come out. Every 
one who is interested is urged to 
make a try whether he has had 
f.nv experience or not. There will 
be a chance for all. It is especially 
desired to have a large number of 
men who are fitted for painting scen- 
ery, costume 'designing, advertising, 
publicity, business, or stenography. 
The freshman class has already sent 
out several men as candidates for 
assistant managerships, but many 
more are needed In the various 
departments. Of course, however, 



the greatest number is expected to 
try out for one of the easts. 

"No one can afford to miss the 
chances offered in an organization of 
this kind. In any department of the 
club's work, there is experience wait- 
ing for all who desire it. Especially 
will the dramatic training make an 
impression. Work of this kind is 
the best means of overcoming self- 
consciousness. It should appeal 
especially to all who are planning to 
go into rural work upon graduation. 
The great cry of sociologists is that 
the movement of the country to the 
city might be checked considerably 
if rural communities offered more 
forms of amusement along musical 
and theatrical lines. Then why not 
train our students along these lines 
in order that they may be able to 
bring their experience back to the 
country with them and start such a 
movement there. It is certainly 
worth thinking over." 



STOCK JUDGING CONTEST 

rContinned from page i] 



Whitmore of M. A. C finished on 
top, a Rhode Island man came next, 
and Moberg and Harvey, both of M. 
A. C. were tied for third place. 
This victory places M. A. C. in the 
lead for the sweepstake trophy, 
which will be given to the college 
scoring the greatest number of points 
in all the judging contests. If the 
team keeps np its good work, it will 
easily win the contest at the Chicago 
fair, a victory we have been looking 
forward to for a number of years. 



f\ FOB YOUR DEN fj 

U Beautiful College Pennants U 
YALE and HARVARD, 

Each 9 in, x 24 in. 

PRINCETON, CORNELL, 
MICHIGAN, 

Each 7 in. x 21 in. 

4— Pennants, Size 12 x 30—4 

Any Leading Colleges of 

Your Selection 

All of our best quality, in their 
proper colors, with colored emblems. 

Either assortment, for limited time, 
sent postpaid for 50 cents and five 
stamps to cover shipping costs. 

Write us for prices before placing 
orders for felt novelties of all kinds. 

The Uem City Novelty Co., 

402 Bittner Street, 
Dayton, - - Ohio. 



FOR GOOD "EATS" 



Go to- 



86 PLEASANT ST. 



Mrs. J. K. W. Davenport 



You win $500 

by writing the best 
Fatima ad. 

We believe the College Man who smokes 
Fatima ought to be able to write a good 
Fatima ad. He knows from experience 
that Fatima is of satisfying excellence 
— that for its superlative quality it is 
moderately priced. He of all Fatima 
smokers, should be able to write of 
Fatima convincingly. 

So we are going to pay $500 to the student 
who prepares and sends to us the best 
original advertisement for Fatima Ciga- 
rettes before June 1, 1915. 

Any student of any college may compete for thU $500 
There are no restrictions, whatever, do strings of any 
kind on tins offer, other than this— every contestant 
must be a regularly enrolled student in an American 
College. We want a student— not a professional ad 
writer — to benefit from this offer. 

Three prominent business men, whose name* will be 
announced later, will act as judges. 

$5 for every ad published 
$500 for the beet 




Marls trfPmTotacco. 

V Mima Cigarettes were Sfst 

■ww vanGSJS of gCSksjs osefl. 

The Turkic Tobacco <*Md la 

Fatim* Ci«ar«R« Is selected by 

expert native bajreel stationed 

at Xanihl. BsMlyy. Casa&s 

eHOQ 3Wy rtapt. 

Fatima 1 1 ive lo one the Wstest 

selling *h«n cent cigarette la) 



packs** 

is ubt.l ib..a 



The |.«W will hx> awarded June I, 
i'»i."». In the meantime, some of the 
ads submitted will be published 
eaeh mont h i n eollege publications, 
together with the name and photo- 
graph of the writer— provided 1 1 » • * 
writer will give permission for 
such publication. 

For eaeh ad so published we will 
pay the wtiler fs. But. the ptibli 
cation of an y ad must not he taken 
to sigflifr that it stnndsany better 
rhanee to win the $500 than the 
ads Unit arc not published. 



Tho»« who try to earn this Tatar aw 
$joo should remember that 
the supreme test of any advertise- 
ment is its Kiting povrr. Whether 
your ad consists of only ten words 
—or runs to a thousand — it should 
he interesting, truthful, convinc- 
ing'— it should give to t lie render 
the buying Impulse. To write 
such advertise men t«, that 
will pass the teat of perfor 
m.i ii. . ■. the writer most be* 
lievein the product he is 
writing about. 



JZf^*JCv~&A~coGK 212 Fifth Ave, New York fc^ 





The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 6, 1914. 



THE TURKISH BLEND CIGARETTE * 



COLLEGE NIGHT 

On Friday evening tbe student 
body, faculty and a few alumni gath- 
ered in the dining hall to celebrate 
the 47th anniversary of the opening 
of the college. With the help of the 
college orchestra, a few selections 
from the quartet, and several snappy 
and interesting speeches, the students 
had one of the most successful get-to- 
gethers of recent years. President 
Butter Held, acting as toastmaster of 
the evening, introduced from the 
alumni and Board of Trustees, 
Messrs. Bowker '71, White *09, Glea- 
son and Monahan '00. 

President Butterfield in his open- 
ing remarks brought back several re- 
miniscences of the old days. His 
talk in part : " Men of M. A. C. 
Forty-seven years ago today, the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College 
opened its doors to students for the 
first time. We have no realization 
today of the battles then fought. If 
we did we would appreciate our col- 
lege even more than we do. Trustees 
and alumni look back and tell us of 
the battles which if encountered to- 
day, would make us quake. The 
number of students had its ups and 
downs; it has been only in recent 
years that the student body has be- 
come so large that we have need of 
enlargement. Besides this the poor 
condition of tbe buildings and the 
lack of support made the work very 
discouraging. Yet throughout all 
this, there always exists a fine col- 
lege spirit. The old alumni are just 
as proud of the college and its work 
as we are. It is well that we meet 
once a year to hear from older men, 
men who have made the college what 
it is ; and to carry us back to the old 
times. It makes better feeliug and 
loyalty to our Alma Mater." 

Mr. Bowker of '71, who was now 
introduced by President Butterfield, 
was the next speaker. Mr. Bowker 
entered the institution when it first 
opened, and since then he has done 
his utmost to help the college along. 
Thirty years ago he began his service 
on the Board of Trustees, applying 
hours of time, thought and energy 
to boost Old Aggie. He first related 
a few interesting incidents of his col- 
lege days, his wit and humor being 
repeatedly applauded by the assem- 
blage. A few of his remarks were : 
M When I entered this college 47 
years ago, there were but three build- 
ings on the campus, and the faculty 
consisted of four professors. The 
campus was a cornfield ; the college 
was a joke. But today it is a serious 
problem and it is going to hold its 
own. 

The best part of my education 
w(\s meeting men who inspired me to 
great things. It is these men that 
we seek for our faculty. Although 
we are living in distracting times, we 
are also living in inspiring and in- 
structive times." 

Mr. White of '09 followed Mr. 
Bowker with a short speech on Suc- 
cess. His address was as follows ; 



14 A man is successful in life when 
he is most useful to his fellow- 
men. College courses aim to make 
men successful ; our college espec- 
ially offers great opportunities in this 
line. The first one of these is en- 
vironment. The sky, hills and won- 
derful vegetation are a great inspira- 
tion. Don't lose sight of the oppor- 
tunity ; make it play its part in your 
life. 

'•The second great opportunity of 
college life is the making of friends. 
Get intimately acquainted with every- 
body. We find qualities in men bet- 
ter than those we have. Study their 
lives ; incorporate their good quali- 
ties. If you have a good quality, 
give it to your fellow students. Be- 
gin your usefulness in college. 

•- A good, strong, clean body is a 
requisite to success. Here, we have 
every opportunity to develop our 
body. Make use of this opportunity, 
for without a clean, strong body, suc- 
cess is impossible. 

•■All the alumni arc glad to have 
received the mental training which is 
offered here. Some are sorry for not 
having trained it sufficiently. Before 
you go much further athTtate with the 
Y. M. C. A., for it stands for right 
living. It is based on truth, the 
Bible ; without truth we cannot hope 
to succeed. And last of all, pray. 
If we hope to succeed, we must grasp 
these opportunities. And success 
means honor to our Alma Mater." 

At this point, Mr. (ileason, vice- 
president of the Board of Trustees I 
ga\e a- a b o rt impromptu speech, ami 
was immediately followed by M. II. 
C. Monahan of 1900, who spoke on 
M. A. C. and the other Agricultural 
colleges." No agricultural college 
in the United States ranks higher 
than the Massachusetts Agricultural 
college. There is, however, an agri- 
cultural institution in Ireland which 
is considered the most successful one 
of its kind. There are thirty-three 
counties in Ireland, each county hav- 
ing two or three county instructors 
who act as principles of a Hi week 
school opened duriug the winter. 
The best boys are selected from this 
school and sent to the Agricultural 
school for one year, where they work 
10 hours a day for 12 months in the 
year. This is run on a practical 
basis and is a commercial success. 
The beat students are now selected 
and sent to the Glass Ovau Agricul- 
tural college for one year. Only one 
third of their work here is practical. 
Tbe students now enter the Koyal 
College of Agriculture, which has a 
three years' course. All the gradu- 
ates from this institution are immed- 
iately employed as college instructors 
or county agents. 

This included the list of speakers 
Hat constituted a very successful 
college night. 



High Grade Furnishings 




e A. B. K. Co.. I'Hl 



Travel the country over and you'll not 
find a choicer or a better line of Men's 
Toggery than you'll find right here. 

The best shirt makers, underwear 
makers, scarf makers and glove 
makers send us these productions. 

The Best in Every Line 
is Here. 

Then again, we are not high priced. 
All the patrons of this store know 
this to be a (act. Test us and see. 

See our new Manhattan and Monarch 
Shirts, $1.50 to $2.50. 

Look at our (Iloves, $1.00 U> $2.50. 

See our Neckwear, 25c Ul $1.50. 



Two Hundred MacKinaws Now Ready for Your Inspection. 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



Ainli. i>l 



! 

Twenty-five cents will be put in a box for tbe 
NEW ATHLETIC FIELD every time you 
buy shoes at our store costing $3.50 or over. 

VERY LATEST STYL.KS. 

Shoes for the Drill- $2.50 to $5.00 



aae'vS 



hoe 



tore 



TO 



FRESHMAN TEAM LOSES 
WILLIST0N 

On Saturday, Oct, 3, the 1918 
class team lost to the heavy Bast- 
hampton team by the score of 41-0. 
The first half was real football, and 
Williston's first score did not come 
until within two minutes of tbe end 
of the second period . The encourag- 
ing feature of the game was the fact 
that t he freshman line showed marked 
improvement. 



School and College Photographers 




LOCALLY: 5* Center St. 



Main Office: 

1546-1548 Broadway, 

New York City 



Northampton, Mass., 

and South Hadley, Mass. 

These Studios offer the best skilled 
artists and most complete 

equipment obtainable 



LAHWOVlTlv5, Tnilorimcl l*r*?mme>r 
Oenta' Furnishings DressSults to Kent Drill Woven and Collars 



Ticket System 



Amity sUt, 



Phone 302-W 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



■DEALERS Ijf- 



Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 




The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 6, 191 4. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOABD OF EDITORS. 

FRANK W. BUELL'iS, 

TYLER S. ROGERS »i6, 

HENRY H. WHITE '15, 

JAMES A. PRICE '15, 

E. SUMNER DRAPER '15. 

THOS.L. HARROCKS'16, Department 

ALFRED A. GIOIOSA»i6, Campus 

FRANK A. SCHEUFELE, Alumni 

MILFORD R. LAWRENCE '17, 

Associate 
RICHARD W. SMITH '17, Associate 



Editor-i 

Managing 

Assistant 

Athletic 

Athletic 



11 Chief 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 

Editor 
Editor 



Oct, 14 — 1-10 p. m., Assembly, Phi 
Kappa Phi address. 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

MAURICE J. CLOUGH '15, Business Manager 
CHAS A. HUNTINGTON. JR. '16, 

Assistant Business Manager 
W. RICHARD-SEARS '15, Advertising Man'g'r 
LESTER E. FIELDING '16, Ass't Adv. Mgr. 
BIRGER R. ROSEQUIST'17, Circulation 



Subscription #1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable 
to Maurice J. Clough. 



Entered u second-class matter at the Amherst 
Pert Office. 

Vol. XXV. Tuesday, Oct. 6. No. 4 

The musical and dramatic clubs 
have articles elsewhere in this paper 
relative to their prospects for the 
coming year. Hoth items point to 
successful seasons and enlarged scope 
not only In engagements but in the 
quality of the production as well. 

Kaster trips and Christmas trips 
to New York and Boston are induce- 
ments that shou'd prove to be good 
drawing cards in establishing added 
interest in the organizations. Both 
clubs have a good number of men 
trying out for positions in either one. 
Personal satisfaction, knowledge and 
experience are among some of the 
assets that a college dramatic society 
gives to a man while the Glee club 
adds to the ability for singing among 
the competitors. 

Just as easily can it be seen that 
such activities will aid this college 
in a broader way thau will athletics. 
When football is in season, there 
are so many games of more import- 
ance absorbing the mind of the 
world that football scores iu 
the smaller colleges are forgotten. 
But musical and dramatic clubs must 
make their name as they go and in 
the making is the opinion, the outside 
world has of a college, Support, 
then, clubs that are endeavoring to 
aid the college in being advertised 
aud well known. 

CAMPUS CALENDAR 

[Notices for this column should be dropped in 
the Collegia* Office or handed to Alfred A" 
Gioiosa* 16, on or before the Satwdar preceding 
each issue. 1 

Oct. 7—1-10 P. »,, Assembly, Pres. 
Kenyon L. Butterfield. Mass 
meeting. 

Oct. 8—6-80 p. m., M. A. C. C. A. 
in chapel. 

Oct, 10— Football, Colgate at Hamil- 
ton, N. Y. FreshmeB ▼■. 
Worcester academy at Wor- 
cester. 

Oct. 12 — Columbus day. Monday 
forenoon, half-holiday. 

Oct. 13—7-00 p. «.. Stockbridge 
club in South college. 



CAMPUS NOTES 

George King Babbitt of Boston, 
has pledged Alpha Sigma Phi. 

Last Thursday a company of 70 
picked men accompanied by the 
cadet band, traveled by special car 
to Greenfield and gave an exhibition 
drill at the county fair. 

George K. Donuell ex-' 15 has not 
transferred to Michigan Agricultural, 
as stated in the Collegian of Sept. 
15, but to the University of Michi- 
gan, at Ann Arbor. He is taking 
a senior course at the university, 
expecting to graduate next June. 

SIX-MAN ROPE PULL 
In the annual six-man rope-pull 
held Monday afternoon at 4-45 the 
sophomores won out by getting seven 
inches more rope than the freshmen 
during the allowed time of two min- 
utes. The 1918 men got an advan- 
tage of about six inches at the drop, 
but were unable to hold it, even 
though they had the heavier team. 
The men pulled in the following 
order: 1917, Cross, Buchanan, Rors- 
trom, Burnham, Light, Webster; 
191S, Goodwin, Boyd, Spaulding, 
Sedgwick, Weeks, Baxter. Boyd 
was the freshman captain and Groff 
the sophomore, while Henderson was 
the 1917 uiauager. All the '17 
men mentioned are now entitled to 
their numerals, Doran was starter 
and Price was time-keeper. 



STOCKBRIDGE CLUB 
The program at last Tuesday's 
meeting of the Stockbridge club was 
a very interesting one. Short ad- 
dresses were given by Don Cande, 
Ralph Hotis and James Harper all of 
the class of 1915. Candee told of 
his experiences on a hay and stock 
farm near Pittstield during the past 
summer. Three things which he 
learned during the summer were : 
to observe all stock carefully, to 
mind the boss without asking 
questions and bow to handle 
farm machinery. Ralph Hotis next 
told of a summer on Mister's farm 
at Hardwick, He made quite a study 
of the farm help problem there, and 
got good experience in watching the 
handling of the 40 men on the place. 
I ,ast , but not least, James Harper 
told of his adventures on Sibley's 
farm at Spencer. "Jim" astonished 
his audience by naming all of the 
stock in Sibley's barns, and by telling 
the ancestors of all the individuals, 
rolling the names off in a very glib 
manner, A large number were out 
to the club, a number of freshmen 
being present. With such interest- 
ing meetings then can be no ques- 
tion but the Stockbridge club will 
have its full quota of followers dur- 
ing the coming season. 

»10.— E. H, Turner, North Wii- 
mot, N. H. Post office, South Dan- 
bury, N. H. 



AGCIE MEN* 

Require Good Stationery 

IllQUire of anyone where to obtain it, and 

Acquire what you need when you correspond— that is 
A Quire of the "Adams' Special 45c a quire " 

Paper that sells elsewhere for 60 cents and more 



GET IT AT 



^CA Lr£ S'o The REXAL L Store 



UNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

i;i «.i I \ K SUNDAY SKKVICE AT 7 H M. 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 



MODERN REPAIR OEPT. 



E. RUSSELL NORTON JJ # ]£. BOLLES 



SALES AfiENT 



Davenport Miller 
Vein Coal 

Best Quality Pennsylvania Coal 



BOSTON OFFICE 

85 Water St. 



NEW YORK OFFICE 
1 Tiroadway 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

CURRAN & DYER, Props. 

Loose* Leaf Note Books and Fountain 
— Pens— 



THE SHOF.MAN 



E. E. MILLETT 

JEWELER and OPTOMETRIST 

Lenses ground while you wait 

College Jewelry 

Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and Guitar Strings 

AMHERST, MASS. 
Next to Pott Office. 



Amherst 



CO - OP LAUNDRY 

High-Grade College Work 



Shirts, 
Collars, 
Cuffs, - 
Plain wash, 
Same, rough dry, 



10-15C 

2 I-2C 
2 I-2C 

48c per doz. 
30c per doz. 



DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, %\ 50 a Suit 

K.T. FnosT.Agent; D. Shebinvan, Asst. Agent 
Try our ticket system 

Put full name and address on laundry 



Come to us for- 



Fireplace Goods, Goat and Trouser Hangers 

1 

Ever Heady Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Dtensils 

Always glad to see yon. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 6, 191 4. 



The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

Jobbers of Wrought Iron and Brass Pipe, Valves 
and Fittings for Steam, Water and Gas, Asbestos 
and Magnesia Boiler and Pipe Coverings, Pipe 
Cut toSketch, Mill Supplies. Engineers and 
Contractors for Steam and Hot Water Heating, 
Automatic Sprinkler Systems, Boiler and Engine 
Connections. - • Holyoke, Mat*. 



We«erve<I for 



BECKMAN 



*• iiiimp 



LOW PRICE TAILORING CO. 

SUITS MADE TO ORDER 
Suits Cleaned, Pressed and Dyed. All kinds of 
Kepairihg for Ladies and Gentlemen neatly done. 
High-grade work by first class tailor. Work 
called fur and delivered. Sell tickets for pressing. 

4 SUITS FOR $ I 50 

GEORGE KOTOWITZ, PROP. 

Main Street, Amherst, Mass. Nash Block 

On your way to the Posi Office. Tel. 4J8-W 



FLEMINGS SHOE STORE 



Northampton 



For particular people 

THE ELMS RESTAURANT 

213 Main St., Northampton 

( Near Amherst car lim*) 



I Quality Restaurant at Moderate 
Prices. 

TRY OUR SPECIALS 

And a la carte service. 

OYSTEES STEAKS CHOPS 
FRIED CHICKEN, ETC. 

Open 6 a. m. to 1 1 p. m 



FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

drown by the Floricu Mural Dept. 

We offer our surplus stock of cut 
flowers and plants at reasonable rates 
to students and faculty. This stock 
is grown in modern houses under 
ideal conditions. Roses, carnations, 
violets, chrysanthemums and sweet 
peas In season. 

(JROWN ON THE CAMPUS 

Telephone MM 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Everything in Photography 

Including Framing, 
Good work speaks for itself. 

Nash I '.lock, Amherst, Mass, 



CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 
About 30 men attended Thursday's 
meeting of the Christian association 
and heard a very interesting talk by 
President Butterfield. He took as 
his subject "The Four Keynotes of 
a Man's Life." To be truly worthy 
of our calling we must learn to obey. 
Only by obedience do we ever learn 
to command rightly and to keep down 
our own wills when they interfere 
with the rights of our fellow men. 

Next to obedience, love should be 
one of the determining factors in 
our lives. We should keep before 
us the love of an ideal, and make our 
actions correspond to our ideas of 
the highest things in life. Service 
is another keynote of a man's life 
which helps him as it helps those all 
about him. As long us a man is con- 
tinually doing some definite service 
for somethiug or somebody, he need 
have little worry about his own spirit- 
ual welfare. The fourth keynote of 
a man's life should he the spirit of 
overcoming. Once we get the habit 
of mastering whatever we undertake 
we will have learned a lesson that 
will be of inestimable help to us 
throughout our lives. 

MEETING OF TRUSTEES 
<;iiax<;k> in faculty axi» OFFICII 

HMU'K. 

The Trustees of tin- Massachusetts 
Agricultural college held a special 
meeting at Amherst Friday, Oct. 2 to 
coubidcr several impurtaut matters of 
business. 

At his request Dean Kdwurd M, 
Lewis was grunted a leave of absence 
without pay until No\ ■ .*», l'Jl I. Dar- 
ing this time Assistant Professor 
Anderson A. Mackiimnio will seive 
as Acting Dean. 

Mr, Harold F. Tompson of Attle- 
boro was elected as acting head of the 
department of market gardening. Mr, 
Tompson graduated from the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural college in 1905, 
and was for some years in charge of the 
department of market gardening at 
this institution. He left college work, 
however, In 1910 and since that time 
has been managing his own market 
gardening farm, at which he has 
made a conspicuous success, Mr. 
Tompson will be at the college 
during the winter months, and will 
devote his time to conducting the 
regular courses in market gardening, 
teaching the short winter courses in 
this subject, and in doing various 
types of extension work in market 
gardening in the state. 

Mr. Luther B. Putney was ap- 
pointed clerk in the treasurer's office. 
Miss Henrietta Webster was promoted 
to the grade of first clerk in the same 
office, and Mi is Gladys E. Moore of 
Kasthaiiipte.il was elected to the cleri- 
cal position of this office recently 
made vacant by the resignation of 
Miss Dorothy Mudge. The appoint- 
ment of Miss Elsa Mattery as steno- 
grapher in the Extension Service, 
was confirmed ; also that of Miss 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 



Mr. Campion has just returned from England with the 

AQUASCUTUM 

OVERCOATS 
Wells-Margetson Neckwear, Caps & Knitted Vests 

On account of war it will not be possible to get any more of 
these goods, so an early inspection will be to your advantage. 




Fine Tailoring 



Men's Furnishings 



-See Our Agents- 



Hubbard's BasE Fertilizers 

the most economical you can use. 

B£ g t!R CROPS 



...■w*>» "t p.u... 



BTsE. 



are the inevitable result. 



THE ROGERS ft HUBBARD COMPANY, Middletown, Conn. 

(Mliii- ami Works, Portland, Conn. 



W% J Q are supplied every year 

DUFD66 S uC6QS tIircct to more , Amcri - 

*^** r m^^^mm^ can pj anters than arc 

the seeds of any other growers. Do you know Burpee- 
Quality "Seeds that Grow" ? If not, we would like to 
make your acquaintance. Simply send us your address 
(a postal card will do) and you will receive Burpee's 
Annual for 1914, — a bright new book of 1 82 pages, which 
is recognized as "The Leading American Seed Catalog." 
Kindly write to-day! Address 

W. ATLEE BURPEE & CO., Burpee BuUdings, Philadelphia 



F. A. SHEPARD 

MEN'S STORE 



USE OUR NEW CASH DISCOUNT CARD 
AND SAVE FIVE PER CENT ON 

SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING 

Furnishings and Custom Tailoring 



C&rpfrvtsr & Morehouse, 
PRINTEnSi 



No. 1, Cook Place, 



Amherst, M 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 6, 1914. 



THE 

Hoover & Smith Go. 

616 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 

Diamond Merchants 

Philadelphia's Official Fraternity Jeweler 

SPECIALISTS IN 

Fraternity Badges, Fobs, Novelties, 

Rings, Charms Prises Trophies, 

Medals College Pins, Fobs, Seals' 

Rings, Charms.*. .'. 



"SCOTTIE" 
H. HOOPER 

Will clean and press your clothes so you 

will be satisfied. It costs no more 

and he is nearer to "Aggie." 

LIBERAL TICKET SYSTEM 

Under Columbia Cafe 



a S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Now at 13 Pleasant St. 
Oculists' Prescript ious Killed, Broken Lenses 
Accurately Replaced. Fine Watch Repairing 
Promptly and .skilfully Done. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 



E. B. DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 

Williams lilock, Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hours : 9 to la a. m., 1-30 to 5 P. m. 

STEAM FITTING. Telephone 50-R 

GAS FITTING, TINNING. 

F. W. DANCE & CO., Plumbers 

Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, Memorial 
Windows, Lead Lights. &c. 

4CliftnnAvr\, AMHERST. MASS. 



THE? "I" 15 I* F»«i» V l*A.KL.Of* 

< li-.in»i 11 k PrfaKliig !:• |i;ii ring 

Oiii. k. Kl ifrvlcc, B#«t Work. I.nwfht *>rl«-' 

All work carefullv done. Work called for and 
delivered. Gi-nts' overcoats, suits, pants an^ 
coats. Ladies' hne linen suits a specialty. 
Teams will call every day at M. A. C. 

WW. HMNKI.IX, Prop. 
Rear Nash BTk. Amherst. Tel. No. U3- 



Now is the time to be planning for 

Fraternity Groups 

Have them taken at 

MISS MeCLELLAN'S STUDIO 



i 



44 State Street. 



Northampton. Mass 



THE 
SMOOTHEST TOBACCO 

, in the moony night with pipe and Velvet 
—that's enjoyment enough for some of us. 

Velvet tobacco— the finest leaf in this great tobacco 
country— bung in big warehouse* f°**2*2y?J , * — * 
mellowing process impowble to ettWterfeit— anqr time, 
little by little, can change the leaf— eliminate the harsh- 
ne»frotlcal«b*eiX &r«ty putf of Veftet takes ore, 
2 vean to pnxluui uu won* 
derit'tfood. 



£10° 



*c Co 



Frances K. Boyntoo as clerk in the 
division of agriculture made vacant 
by the resignation of Miss L. M. 
Rarke. 

The resignations of Prof. Elmer K. 
Eyerly and Mr. Ivan McKellip were 
formally accepted, and Mr II. E. 
Baldinger of Cornell University was 
elected to fill the vacancy in the dairy 
department caused by the resignation 
of Mr. McKellip. 



W*V 



One ounce bags 5 



for 



smokers 



CROSS COUNTRY RUN 

The annual interclnss cross country 
run will be held Oct. 17 at 3 p. m. 
This year the cross country is to be 
a departure from the general plan of 
former years in that the course will 
be truly cross country instead of a 
road race. The course begins at the 
Drill hall, leads up the hill by Proxy's 
across the fields to the C. V. tracks 
where a turn is made through the 
woods on the east of the railroad 
and (hence southeast toward Triangle 
street on to the campus near the 
orchards, endi ng at the Drill hall. 

Each class can enter twelve men ; 
seveu to comprise the team ; the first 
five men finishing for each class 
team to figure in the scoring. 

First place shall count one point, 
second two points, and soon, each 
contestant having scored against 
him a number of points represented 
by the place in which he finishes. 

The class team shall be the winner 
which shall have the least number <>!' 
points scored against it. Medals 
will be awarded to the first three men 
finishing. 

Entries for the inter class run 
.should be handed to Manager Clink 
by Oct. 18. 



INTERNATIONAL LAW 
DISCUSSED 
Professor Bpragne ■ddressed sn 

audience of about 100 students in 
the chapel last Tuesday evening, his 
subject being "International Law 

ami its Rotation to th» BuroDean 

War." Dr. BpntgOC explained filth 
several points of international law 
bearing directly on the European sit- 
uation, and gave an interesting half 
hour address along these lines. 
These lectures will be continued, and 
are to be held each Tuesday evening 
at 6-30 i- m. in the chapel. At this 

evening's lecture Dr. Spragnc trill 

speak further on this most interest- 
ing subject. 



RIFLE CLUB ELECTION 
At n recent meeting of tbe It We 

club, the following officers were 
elected: Raymond I'pton, presi- 
dent; Kalph Hoii>. secretary and 

Raymond Wetherbee. treasurer. 
At the first of the semester, the 
CoLMOTAH incorrectly included in 
its college directory, l{. M. I'pton 
as president of the Kifle club. The 
recent election baa corrected the 
difficulty so no apologies are really 
uecessary. 



ASSEMBLY 

The scheduled speaker for Wednes- 
day's assembly, Director W. H. Jor- 
dan of the Agricultural Experiment 
Btatiou at Geneva, N. Y., found it 
impossible to come to Amherst, and 
his place was filled by Prof. F. A. 
Waugh of M. A. C. * Prof. Waugb 
gave a very interesting illustrated 
lecture on civic art in Germany. 

THE 1916 INDEX 

Save your money. 

During the course of the next week 
or two it will be the privilege of all 
concerned to " come across " for a 
ticket entitling them to a copy of this 
year'B jhtefs*. Business manager 
Fielding has been working on a new 
selling plan for the book which will 
avoid the inevitable rush when the 
books appear, and which will make 
sure that every man gets a copy who 
wants one. The new book is a won- 
der, if we may believe the enthusi- 
astic editors, and will be a very good 
investment. There are several new 
features in the book that are abso- 
lutely original with this edition. The 
editors are mum as to details but say 
that the features are of such a nature 
as to make the Annual of actual 
value not only to the students but to 
all the alumni as well. 

The editorial department is hard 
at work. During the summer many 
of the class pedigrees weie written 
and most of the work is uow on the 
other write-ups in the first part of the 
book. All material for the first 
quarter of the Annual has been sent 
to the publishers, and proof reading 
will begin within a day or two. 

The art and photograph depart- 
ments have already tinned out work 
that will insure the success of the 
book. The drawings are of I higher 
order than ever before and are orig- 
inal. A set of photographs has been 
obtained that are hitherto unpublished 
and several features are promised in 
this line. 

The business department has been 
obtaining advertisements and has 
been handling the work of getting 
the cuts made. The book has been 
carefully worked up ; the paper has 
been carefully selected, the ink even 
has been the subject of investigation 
The publishers have guaranteed I 
binding that will actually bind and 
stay that way Indefinitely. The cover 
lias been chosen and is of a stvle 
much used in the highest priced books 
Of today, and at the same time is 
durable and exceptionally beautiful. 
It has never been used in an ht&Mt 
before. Space forbids »nv more 
description of this new book, but 
more will appear in the near future. 
Save vour monev ! 



1913 NOTES 

"Nubbie" Adams and Noun Clark 
were loyal fans at the Holy Cross 
game. Let's have a few more Thir 
teeners at the next game. George 
Zabri/.kie 2nd and Herman T. lioehrs, 
both of New York city were at col- 
lege for the week-end. 

Warren Clifford Whitman, Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology, class 
1916, home address, $j Chapel street, 

Arlington 

Thomas l\ Dooley. Boston Normal 
School 1914, teache'i. Martin School, 
Boston. Home address, 820 Silver 
street, South Boston. 

Bernard J. Kelley has been do- 
ing great woik with Prof. C. A. 
Morton's boys and girls agricultural 
clubs this summer. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 6, 1914. 



OVER 66 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 




MUSICAL CLUBS 

[Continued from page i] 



Trade Marks 

Designs 
Copyrights Ac. 

Anyone lending a sketch and description may 
qnlcUly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
invention Is prnhnhly pnieiimhle. ('(■niiiiiinlra- 
lions stiictly confident lul. HANDBOOK on I'uii'iits 
sent free. Oldest agency for securnir patents. 

Patents taken tnrouirh Munn A Co. receive 
tpecial notice, without c harg e, la tbe 

Scientific American. 

A handsomely IllnstratPd weekly. T.arenst dr. 

culatioti of any m-ientltlo journal. Terms $3 a 
v#>iir: four months, SI. Sold by all newmlealers. 

MUNN & Co. 364 B — » New York 

Brand* Office. (96 F Bt, Washington. D. C. 



Batchelder & Snyder Co. 

PACKERS. POULTRY UKICSHKKS 
AND HI I IKK MAKKKS. 



WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

Beef, Mutton, Lamb, Veal, Pork, Lard, Hams 

Bacon, Sausages, Poultry, Game, Butter 

Cheeae, Eggs, Beans. 

i irfice & Stores iJ.;,. 57.59. >■ & 63 Blackstone St. 
lloitoo. Packing House, Brighton, Mass 
Native Poultry Dressing Plant, Boston. 
Creameries in Vermont. 



WOOF-WOOF 

Mac, howse your dog ? 
Dan, I did, 

Ha — ha, 
And another puppy bit 

the dust 



DE LAVAL 

as superior to other separa- 
tors as other separators are 
to gravity creaming. 




OTHER SEPARATORS SKIM cleaner 
than is possible on the average with gravitv 
creaming, and De Laval Cream Separators 
skim as much doner still than other separa- 
tors, particularly under the harder conditions 
• >l cool milk, running heavy cream or sepa- 
rating the milk of stripper cows. 

OTHER. SEPARATORS SAVE THEIR 
cost every year, as a rule, over gravity cream, 
mg, and De Laval Separators save their cost 
•♦cry year over other separators and last from 
ten to twenty yean, or on an average five 
times as long as other separators. 

WHV NOT solve IT NOW IN I III. 
only sttre and safe way possible? If you haven't 
a separator, liuy a De Laval. If you have a 
poor separator, replace it with a De Laval. 



THE OE LAVAL SEPARATOR CO. 

New York Chicago San Francisco 



RAHAR'S INN 

Northampton, Massachusetts 

TWO BLOCKS FROM THE DEPOT , 

The hotel where there is comfort (with- 

out extravagance.) More popular 

than ever. 

Special Luncheon 12— 2 P. M. 

PRIVATE OININC ROOMS 

A la Carte Service 
Prom 6-30 to II P. M. 



York. With such a man as director 
there is no reason why the M. A. C. 
glee club cannot compete with those 
of the larger universities, hut 
whether or not this can be done rests 
entirely with the members. 

"The itinerary for the coming sea- 
son is beginning to assume material 
proportions and it is the intention 
of the management to secure an ex- 
tensive trip during the latter half of 
the Christmas recess throughout the 
eastern Bection of Massachusetts. 
The^New York trip* is expected to 
consume the greater part of the 
spring holidays. This circuit will 
include Rutherford, Paterson, Mont- 
clair and East Orange, New Jersey ; 
Middletown, Flushing and New 
Rochelle, New York. The glee club 
will in all probability assist Calvm v 
Chsir the first Sunday of its stay iu 
New York. Many local concerts are 
being arranged for and plans are un- 
der way for a three day engagement 
at the principal variety theatre of 
Hartford. 

"The most important engagement 
of the year if successfully contracted 
for will be an appearance at Carne- 
gie Hall, New York, in conjunction 
with the clubs of Harvard. Dart- 
mouth, Columbia and the University 
of Pennsylvania. This will be in 
the form of a competition, the prize 
for which will be presented by one of 
the leading musical publishing houses 
of New York.'* 

When referring to the material left 
from last year, Mr. Anderson said . 
" There is much good material re- 
maining for the three lower parts. 
The second bass contingent includes 
Hildreth, Tower, and Hyde, all three 
of whom served at least a year. 
Among the first basses who can claim 
particular part distinction are Tower, 
Blanpied, Moberg and Cale, while 
the second tenors include as veter- 
ans Verbeck, Dodge, Towne and 
Hatfield. The only men of distinct- 
ion serving iu the first tenor de- 
partment are Nicl.erson and Swan, 
thus making it iu.perative that men 
with voices of first tenor quality put 
n an appearance. 

"Recruits for the mandolin club 
are in great demand, especially men 
who can manipulate guitars. This 
department of the organization has 
never assumed proportions of which 
it is capable due to the fact that a 
great many of the men who have man- 
dolins have failed heretofore to put in 
an appearance and it is to these men 
especially that this call must appeal. 
The orchestra is also in need of a 
number of wind and reed instruments 
and an invitation is hereby issued in 
such men as can perform upon cor- 
nets, trombones, French horns, oboes 
flutes and clarionets. 

"To conclude, it is the desire of 
the management that all men who are 
in any manner whatsoever gifted 
with musical ability hand in their 
names at room 11, South College be* 
fore the end of the week. 




Cbc Pheasant 

Burnt? St., Bmbcr*t 

Breakfast, Luncheon, 
Afternoon Tea. 

Dinner if arranged for. 
Telephone 470 

Rooms for Transients, 

theTeachers Exchange 

Of Hnston jao Bvyltten St. 

Recommends Teachers, Tutors and Schools 



An Especially Oood Commission Proposition- 
Cash for test ordcts— Article widely Advertised— 
Cuts down expense in power 1 l.uits— Address 
Engineering Supply Co., j»j8 N. utl> street, 
Philadelphia. Pa. 



* They're not short-lived 

The Jerseys 

In 1913 eighteen J»rw» 
Cows were oTliciaily tested 
which averaged 12 years 
and 7 months of ape. Their 
a /crane milk production 
\ is 81 7 pounds. Average 
butter i t. ;- 7 pounds. One 
of iii. e cows was over 18 
yean old. 
Longevity, Crn*Httt*tori f"* Ftrmnmic 
Production am jci s.y » .. , .. levittic*. 

MmaacM jersey rvme club 

J24 W. 2Jd St., New York t try 




(0 ' 



NON-LEAK ABLE 



jE*S $2.50 



111 ^Y[Kj]S^ ZZZ ^^ fount ain pen 
j L 'Lia^^^^ Minimize your fountain pen 

W • "^^^ troubles by owning a Moore's. C. It Is the 
f/ ^4r safest, soundest and most dependable pen known. 
~ Cits strength lies in its very simplicity. Nothing 

fin iky to get out of order. C. You can give your- 
self no better treat than a Moore's Non-leakable. ; 

For Sale by Dealers Everywhere (j 

American Fountain Pan Company 

Adams, Cuehinft A Foster. Selling Agents 
lot DEVONSHIRE STREET :: :: BOSTON, MASS. 



ANO 

UP 




Do You Raise 300 Bushels of Potatoes per A cre? 

HREE hundred bushels per acre is 
not an unusual yield by any means, 
but did you get it this year ? 
<JIi you were planning to raise 300 
bushels of potatoes to the acre how 
-d far apart would you space your rows? 
How far apart would you drop the seed pieces in 
the row? 

•lIHow much fertilizer would you use to grow 300 
bushels of potatoes per acre? How would you 
apply it ? 

<IAre you sure that your seed potatoes are true to 
name and true to type ? 

flWhat are you doing to prevent "scab," and early 
and late blight ? 

flDid you have a short crop of potatoes because of 
dry weather ? Have you decided how you will 
overcome this trouble in the future ? 

t}Ail these practical points, sad many more, are fully cohered an oar 
sew book 

"Potatoes: A Money Crop" 

which will he teat free to every potato grower who requests a copy, and 
menttom this paper. 

tJThis book is written by a man who himself bat bad years of experience as 
a potato grower, and who baa made a eareiul study of the beat method* of 
other grower*. 

<JI( you read this book you will keep it (or future reference. It it a "worth 
while" publication 



'he Coe-Mortimer Compan 

51 CHAMBERS STREET, NEW YORK CITY' 



E. Frank Coe Fertilizers 

151*57 Itft. BUSINESS FARMERS' STANDARD 1 g\ a A 
lOO/ FOR OVER F1FTV-FIVE YEARS l«7l4 






— 






8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 6, 19 14. 



JOIN THE BUNCH AT 



EPSTEIN'S TAILORING PARLORS 

Now located over post office. Up one flight 

Pressing and Cleaning a Specialty 

Liberal Ticket System 1 el. V> M 

T. MIJEMVTKA. 

SHOE STORE 

Shoes Repaired by Machinery 

SHOE SHINE 

( (pen Sunday from 7-12, On your way to P. < ). 



The Highland Hotel 

Corner of 11 ill man and Barnes Streets, three 
blocks from the Union Depot, is a modern hos- 
telry run on the European Flan. It is just a step 
from Main Street, away from the noise and dust 
and yet in the center of the business district. 

Its rooms are well furnished and comfortable, 
having a telephone and hot and cold running 
water in every room. Prices • ! and up; rooms 
with bath (single) Sl.SO and up. 

Its excellent cuisine and well ventilated dining 
room makes a meal a pleasant memory— every- 
thing of the highest quality, well cooked and 
served in the best possible manner. 

Stay at the Highland Hotel once and you will 
anticipate staying there again. Music every 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Offers courses of instruction in twenty six teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 

Agricultural Chemistry 



evening. 



D. EL SIEVERS, 



Highland Hot. I 



Springfield, Ma*«. 



SIUDEHTFURHITURE 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairyimg 

Poultry Husbandry 

Economic Entomology 

Microbiology 

Plant Physiology and Pathology 

Agricultural Education 

For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



FOUNTAIN PENS 

Moore's Swan's 

Waterman's 

Thirty-six dozen pens to select from, 
OUR RULE 



Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded." 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



E. D. MARSH ESTATE 



COX SONS 



— AND — 



I [ Hk V I N I N G 

71-74 Madison Avenue, New York 

CAPS AND GOWNS 

Best Materials and Workmanship 

WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

a 7 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



Joint Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics, 

M. A. C. Athletic Fie'd Association, 

The College Senate, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Rifle club, 

Roister Doisters 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Fifteen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Sixteen Index, 

M. A. C. Christiau Association, 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Stockbridge Club, 



.1. F. Nicholson, I Mot 



Philip II . Smith, Secretary 

C. S. Hicks, Treasurer 

E. Towns, President 

J. A. Price, Manager 

S. Prouty, Manager 

E. F. Clark, Manager 

E. S. Draper, Manager 
H. Bishop, Manager 

R. M. Upton, President 

hieing and Business Manager 

FA. Anderson, Manager 

II. M. Rogers, Manager 

L. E. Fielding, Manager 

H. H. White, President 

.1. E. Harper, President 

F. W. Buell, President 
P. F. Whitmore, President 



KlUILIHID 1802 

Stkphen Lane Folqer 

MANUPAOTDRIMU JKWML.KR 

180 BROADWAY. NEW YORK 

OLUB AND COLLEGE 
PINS AND RINGS i* 

UOI.I), Nll.VRR AJCD IIKI.N/.K MHOAI.1S 




Wriglit dfe l>it»o« 

MprltiK Catalogue 

Containing Prices and Styles of 

Base Ball, Lawn Tennis, Oolf and 

General Athletic (ioods — IS OUT 

The Wright & Ditson Base Hall Uniforms 

are better than ever this year, Manaftrs 

should write for samples and prices. 

Catalogue FREE to any addreaa 

WHIGHT 4to DITISON 

344 Washington St., Boston, Mass. 



there are Seven Good Keasons whv you should 
buy your 

COAL 

or 

C. R ELDER 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Stationery, Newspapers, 
Magazines and Col- 
lege Supplies 

A. J. HASTINGS 

NewJealtT. 



The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Mt.. alongside the 
famous Bloody Brook battle ground 
to Old Deerfield, thence to Green- 
field, Turners Falls and across the 
"Plains" to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls, 

50 Mites of Trackage node rn 
Equipment — Train Dispatch- 
ing System -Freight and Ex- 
press Service over entire line. 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
Company 



CARS 



Leave AOOIE COLLEGE for MOL- 
YOKE at 45 min. past the hour. 



CARS 



CUttd tniy frvm r A. M to 4 A. M. 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers ot 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product, 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of " Gold Medal Uniforms, " 



Leave AMHERST for AOOIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mln. past the hour. 

Special Can «t RMHiubh Rates 



AMHERST & SUNDERLAND ST. BY. CO 



1434*1426 Chestnut St., 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



For a Daily and Sunday Newspaper 
You should Read 

Springfield Republican 

While you are at college in Amherst. 

It hat Mil <>f The M . A. C . Newt 

The iv<-t Sporting Maws 

rail General News 

A Strong Editorial Page 

Interesting; FeatarM 

It la a Baal Newspaper 

Daily, 3 cents ; 70 cents a month ; #2.00 
a quarter. 

Sunday, 5 cents; §o cents a quarter. 

Subscribe by mail or through the Amherst Newt- 
"ir. 






MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXV. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, October 13, 1914. 



No. 5 



AGGRESSIVE COLBY TEAM 

FOURTH ON SCHEDULE 



Maine College Relies on Strong Back- 
field for Line Gaina— Game 
at Portland. 

Colby, Aggie's next opponent, has 
one of the scrappiest and most aggres- 
ive teams in New Kngland, with a 
record this season of two overwhelm- 
ing victories and one defeat. The 
Maine college started off her season 
by defeating Holy Cross 21-0 on 
Oct. 3, following that on the follow- 
ing Saturday with a 66-0 victory over 
New Hampshire State, On Oct. 10, 
Colby received her first defeat of the 
season at the hands of the strong 
Tufts team, losing by a score of 
40-14, though running up the largest 
total of points that has been scored 
against the Medford eleven this 
season. 

The fact that both Massachusetts 
and Colby showed about the same 
superiority over Holy Cross, the 
only eleven which both teams have 
met this season, would indicate that 
both teams have an even chance of 
victory. Of the two teams, M. A.C. 
is playing a more successful Open 
game, while Colby has been relying 
more upon line plunges by her back- 
field. Fraser at fullback has l>een 
playing a whirlwind game and doing 
most of the scoring. 

The probable line-up of the Colby 
team is as follows: r. e. Royal 
(Fstes), r. t. Ladd (Lease ur), r. g. 
Pendegast, c. Starawood (Ramsdell), 
1. g. Darsey (Kolseth), I. t. Dacey 
(Ladd), 1. e. Grossman, q. b. Caw- 
ley, r. h b. Perry, I. h. b. Schuster, 
f. b. Fraser. 

The Colby-M. A. C. game will be 
played at Portland, Me., on Satur- 
day afteruoon. Oct. 17. Coach 
Brides plans to give the team a 
hard workout this week in prepare- 
I mi 1 for the fourth game on the 
schedule, and to strengthen the weak 
points which were evident in the Col- 
gate game. Prospects look bright 
for a win over Colby, although the 
game will be hard-fought before 
either side secures a victory. 



AGGIE'S SPECIALTY RISING 
IN NATIONAL PROMINENCE 



FRESHMAN NIGHT COMMITTEE 

The following committee has been 
chosen to take charge of the Fresh- 
man Night performance : Harold 
Jones, chairman ; Howard Russell, 
George Duncan, W. R, Warren and 
P. F. Hunnewell. 



Marksmen Among College Students 
of Country Pass 5000 Mark- 
Work Backed by Congress. 

Ever since the year 1910, when 
Aggie's great sprint on the range 
began, the success of her rifle sport- 
ing teams has been phenomenal. 
Four times indoor champions of the 
country and three times captors of 
the outdoor trophy, is the record the 
M. A. C. boys have hungup. The 
only drawback has been the ten- 
dency among outsiders to underrate 
the value of the sport. But it is 
finally coming into its own, accord- 
ing to the United States War Depart- 
ment, which chronicles : 

'•Over "»,000 college marksmen is 
the record for the college year end- 
ing June 30, 1914. Through the 
combined efforts of the National 
Kille Association of America and the 
National Board for the Promotion of 
Kifle Practice, says the Department, 
rapid strides are being made looking 
to the introduction of rifle shooting 
as one of the recognized sports in 
the colleges throughout the country 
and the movement has been still 
further stimulated by a recent act of 
Congress authorizing the free issue 
of rifles and ammunition to college 
and university clubs. 

This work was begun several years 
ago by the National Rifle Associa- 
tion backed by the War hepartment 
with a result that at the present time 
there arc I "J colleges and universities 
having well organized and active 
rifle clubs. National championships 
are now being carried on annually 
both indoor and outdoor. The 
annual competition for college teams 
is now being organized for the in- 
door season. These matches are 
shot on indoor ranges with 22-caliber 
rifles. The championship for 1914 
was won by the Michigan "Aggies" 
and the outdoor champion five were 
the Massachusetts "Aggies, 1 * 

As an evidence of the fact that the 
athletic authorities of a great many 
colleges and universities are recog- 
nizing marksmanship as a part of 
their athletic curriculum, many of 
them are giving the college letter to 
those students who make the rifle 
teams. 

A feature of this work which is 
worthy of mention is the fact that 
there have been no serious accidents 



FRATERNITIES WELCOME 
MANY FRESHMEN MEMBERS 

Eighty Men Pledged Among Nine 

Fraternities at Close of Four 

Weeks' Season, 

Friday, the closing day of the M. 
A.c fraternity rushing season for 
the fall of 1914, fouud about no 
of the entering class pledging in the 
nine fraternities. The season was 
very successful for practically all the 
fraternities, and in many cases there 
developed considerable rivalry. 

Following is the list of men 
pledged, the fraternities being named 
in the order of their founding in this 
institution ; 

^. t. v. 
1916. 
Frederick W. Jerome, Stockbridge. 

1918. 
Frank Baiubridgc, Paterson, N. J. 
Louis P. Kinmerick, Paterson, N .1. 
I). B. Farrar, Amherst. 
M. W. Gillette, Revere. 
J. L. Powell, Newport, R. I. 
William Sawyer, Berlin. 
Lewis W, Spaulding, Hingham. 
Hubbard Swiff, VV. Falmouth. 
Stephen Richardson. Marlboro. 

■ -ill ROMA KAPPA. 

R. 1). Hawley, Springfield. 

Halph W. Harwood. Bane. 

D, H. Hun toon, Norwood. 

P. F. Hunnewell, West Somerville. 

J. A. Chapman, Salem. 

P. t« Kirkham. Springfield. 

K. N. Mitchell, Medford. 

R. W Thorpe, Medford. 

A. U. Tilton, Weltesley. 

I,. M. vanAlstyne, Kiuderhook, N.V. 

W. K. Warren, Worcester. 

RAPPA SIGMA. 

Francis C. Barbour, Hartford, Conn. 

G. F. Holmes, Ipswich. 

I; P. Irviue, Wilmette, III. 

N. O, Lanphear, Windsor, Conn. 

A. N. McGlellan, Keene, N. H. 
K. L. Messenger, Winated, Conn. 
('. T, Mower, Montpelier, Vt. 

R. W. Weeks, Hyde Park. 
H. N. Worlhley, Wakefield. 
J. L. Wright, Putnam, Conn. 
John Yesair, Byfield. 

KAPrA OAMHA PHI, 

B. L. Johnson, Dorchester. 

R. N. Bolster, Worcester, 

BCTA KAPPA PHI, 

F. M, Babbitt, Fairhaven, 
F. J, Binks, Mavnard. 
R, E. Brown, Sharon. 



[Continued on page 3) 



FIRST QUARTER LOSES 

COLGATE GAME FORM. A. C. 

Score Fails to Show duality of Foot- 
ball Exhibited by Massa- 
chusetts Men, 

Rushed off their feet by the well 
balanced, speedy attack of the Col- 
gate backfield during the first quar- 
ter of the game, the Aggie team 
was defeated on Saturday 25-0. 
Colgate made three touchdowns and 
kicked goal from one o' them for a 
total of 19 points before the first 12- 
minute quarter had ended. The 
last three-quarters of the game were 
very evenly balanced. Colgate's 
last score coming at the beginning of 
the fourth q. tarter as a result of two 
penalties acd a partially blocked 
kick. M. A. C. showed their best 
form in this quarter also, rushing 
the ball practically the entire length 
of the field on line planges only to 
lose it on Colgate's five vard line as 
the result of an incomplete forward 
pass. 

Throughout the game was old style 
football with few exceptions. Col- 
gate rou Id not work end runs to 
advautage so confined her plays to 
skin tackle and lineplunges, M.AC, 
also worked this style of football 
varying it only occasionally with 
forward passes. 

The Colgate team was heavy and 
had a fast backfield. Their string 
of substitutes was a long one and 
had many capable players in it. 

The game was very cleanly played 
throughout. Huntington of Colgate 
received an injury to bis shoulder 
early in the game while I ><»!«■ left one 
of his feet too far out in a scrimmage 
and strained one of the tendons in 
his ankle, The injury should not 
keep him ont of the game for very 
long, however. 

Fight or nine loyal Aggie alumni 
were at the game and made np in 
spirit what they lacked in volume in 
cheering the Massachusetts team. 
Former cheer leader Birdsall '13 was 
in charge, Among those that consti- 
tute the cheering stand were Risley 
'On, Johnson '10 and Francis '10. 

Captain Swarthont of Colgate 
played an exceptional game and 
along with Brooks at tackle to open 
the hole made the greater part of 
Colgate's gains. Palmer and Darl- 
ing divided honors in carrying tin 
ball with the rest of the backfield 
hard at work. 



[Continued on page 7 J 



I 

1 



2 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 13, 1914. 



The game iu detail : 

FIRST QUARTER. 

Colgate woo the toss and Palmer 
kicked off to Robiuson who ran the 
ball back to the center of the field. 
West made 12 yards, seven yards 
and then four more on skin tackle 
plays. Swarthout made ten yards, 
Robinson three and West added two 
more on line plunges bringing the 
ball to the 12 yard line. Anderson 
theu dodged around his right end on 
a fake line plunge for a touchdown. 
The ball was missed by Colgate on 
the kiekout and no goal was kicked, 
score 6-0. Palmer kicked off to 
West who ran the ball back to Col- 
gate's 86 yard line. The same game 
was then repeated. Swarthout made 
first down. Robinson made five, 
Swarthout six and eud run netted 
2") more yards. Anderson tried the 
same play again but was thrown for 
a loss of seven yards. Forward to 
West made 16 yards and left the ball 
on the 10 yard line. In one plunge 
Swarthout weut over for the second 
touchdown. Brooks kicked the goal 
Bcore 13-0. Palmer kicked off to 
West. Swarthout made nine yards, 
West made ten. Spencer then took 
West's place. Robiuson made it first 
down again on along run. Swarth- 
out made seveu and on the next play 
made the third touchdown. The 
goal was missed, score Colgate 11), 
M. A. C. 0. Danforth replaced 
Schlotterbeck. When A bell kicked 
off to Darliug, M. A. C. obtaiued 
the ball for the first time since the 
game had started. Palmer, Darling 
and Grayson made seven yards 
between them aud Palmer was forced 
to punt. His kick was caught by 
Anderson on the Aggie 42 yard line. 
Warren here took Svvarthout's place. 
He made nine yards on two tries. 
Spencer made seven more as the 
quarter euded with it Colgate's ball 
on Aggie's 22 yard line. 

HKJOVD QIAUTKK. 

Warren made it first down for Col- 
gate on Aggie's 18 yard line. M. 
A. C. then started to get into the 
game and play football. Darling 
threw Anderson for an eight yard 
loss. The next play made no gain 
and Brooks tried a goal from field 
which he miued. If this kind of 
defensive work hail started earlier in 
the game Colgate's score would have 
been much smaller. The ball was 
brought out to the 20 yard line. 
Grayson could not gain. Darling 
made 10 yards but offside playing 
gave a five yard penalty. Palmer 
kicked to Flanigan on Colgate's 40 
yard line who bronght the ball back 
18 yards. Colgate could not gain and 
Brooke was forced to punt. His 
kick went over the goal line and the 
ball was brought out to the §0 yard 
mark, Palmer then circled end for 
-'-' yards. Aggie then woke ftp and 
a forward. Palmer to Plalsted added 
nine yards more. Darling got five 
yards for first down. A short for- 
ward pass to Grayson made five more 



yards. A forward pass then went 
outside and Colgate got the ball. A 
fifteen yard penalty for pushing 
against Colgate gave her the ball on 
her 28 yard line. After short gains 
Abeil kicked to Darling who brought 
the ball back to Aggie's 25 yard line. 
Palmer made five, Darling made six 
and first down. Palmer made seven 
and added six more for another first 
down. Darling added six more as 
the half ended with the ball in the 
middle of the field. M. A. C. 
gained 76 yards to Colgate's 24 on 
rushing the ball in this quarter. 

THIRD QUARTER. 

Colgate's original score making 
lineup returned to the game. Darl- 
ing ran back the kick off to the 21 yard 
line. Palmer made a yard and seven 
more. Melican made it first down. 
Palmer made three yards. Grayson 
seven and then Palmer broke through 
for 20 yards only to be called back 
and a 15 yard penalty for holding 
inflicted. Three incomplete forwards 
were theu tried and Palmer was 
forced to kick. From the middle of 
the field he punted over the goal line. 
The ball was put in play on the 20 
yard line. Swarthout made 28 yards 
on four tries. Robinson was thrown 
for a loss and Brooks puuted to Mel- 
ican who was downed on Aggie's 16 
yard line. Palmer made four yards 
and then a costly penalty of 15 
yards was inflicted on M. A. C. for 
holding. Darling could not gain. 
Palmer was forced to kick behind 
his own goal line and booted the ball 
to the 40 yard line. The ball was 
brought back by Robinson to the 25 
yard line. Swarthout made it lirst 
down on the 15 yard line. Robin- 
son thrown for a loss and West 
made two as the quarter ended with 
Colgate's ball on Aggie's 12 yard 
line. 

Hit Kill QL'ARTKK. 

On the (list play M. A. C. was off- 
side and instead of its being Col- 
gate's fourth down the penalty gave 
them first down on Aggie's seven 
yard line. West made five yards 
and it took Swarthout three plunges 
before he barely made the next two 
yards for the last score. No goal 
was kicked and the score was 25-0. 
Dole was hurt in this play and his 
place was taken by Perry. Dunn 
going in Perry's position. 

Colgate kicked off to Grayson who 
came back to the 25 yard line. 
Aggie then showed good torm. 
Palmer made 10 yards. Palmer 
made six then three more and then 
made it first down. Grayson made 
10 yards, Darling made five, Gray- 
son fi.m and Darling made it first 
down with seven yards more. Col- 
gate was offside on the next two 
plays. Darling made three yards 
and Palmer three, Grayson could not 
gain. It was fourth down with four 
yards to go with it. Aggie's ball on 
Colgate's five yard Hue after rushing 
the ball 70 yards. A forward paas 
was lost, however, and the best 



chance to score was gone. A few 
more plays followed and the game 
ended with the ball in the middle of 
the field. Final score Colgate 25, 
M. A. C. 0. 
Lineup : — 

COLGATE. MASSACHUSETTS. 

Stewai t,( iilman, Ic re ,1 )ay,U iggiubotliam 
Brooks, Carroll, It rt, Curran 

(Joodbond, Ig rg, Perry, Dunn 

Genesee, c c, Dole, Perry 

Barton, rg Ig, Jordan 

Abell, rt It, Schlotterbeck 

Huntington, Neilsen, re le, Plaisted 

Anderson, qb qb, Melican 

West, Spencer, rhb Ihb, Darling 

Robinson, Flanigan, lhb rhb, Grayson 
Swarthout, Warren, fb fb, Palmer 

Touchdowns — Swarthout 3, Anderson. 
Goal from touchdown— Brooks. Referee 
Woodlock of Boston. Umpire— Miller 
of Syracuse, Head linesman— Stevens 
of Bowdoin. Time of quarters— 12, 10, 

10, 12. 



LEADERSHIP 

Leadership, a word signifying am- 
bition, strength, power and honor, 
and chosen for our motto for the en- 
suing year, was the subject of Presi- 
dent Buttefield's talk at the assem- 
bly, Wednesday. In his speech. 
President Butterfield touched upon 
the work of this college and every 
other agricultural institution, and 
their means of attaining success and 
leadership in their special line. His 
talk in part was : "We like to look 
upon this college as a leader ; it 
should be a leader. The faculty, 



C FOB YOUR DEN R 

U Beautiful College Pennants U 
YALE and HARVARD, 

Each 9 in. x 24 in. 

PRINCETON, CORNELL, 
MICHIGAN, 

Each 7 in. x 21 in. 

4— Pennants, Size 12 x 30— 4 

Any Leading Colleges of 

Your Selection 

All of our best quality, in their 
proper colors, with colored emblems. 

Either assortment, for limited time, 
sent postpaid for 50 cents and five 
stamps to cover shipping costs. 

Write us for prices before placing 
orders for felt novelties of all kinds. 

The (iem City Novelty Co., 

402 Bittner Street, 
Dayton, - - Ohio. 



FOR GOOD "EATS" 



-Qo to- 



86 PLEASANT ST. 



Mrs. J. K. W. Davenport 



You win $500 & 

by writing the best 
Fatima ad. 

We believe the College Mm who smokes 
Fatima ought to be able to write a good 
Fatima ad. He knows from experience 
that Fatima is of satisfying excellence 
—that for its superlative quality it is 
moderately priced. He of all Fatima 
smokers, should be able to write of 
Fatima convincingly. 

So weare going to pay $500 to the student 
who prepares and sends to us the best 
original advertisement for Fatima Ciga- 
rettes before June 1, 1915. 

Any student of any college may compete for this $500 
Hera are no restrictions, whatever, no string! of any 
kind on this offer, other than this— every contestant 
But be a regularly enrolled student in an American 
Collin.-. We want a student— not a professional ad 
writer— to benefit from this offer. 

Three prominent business ben, whose names will be 
announced later, will act as judges. 

$5 for every ad pu bli s hed 
$500 for the best one submitted 




Made a< Pare Totwxo. 
FMima CfgMetM were it* 
mud* Urnou* by college ror«. 
The Turkish Tobacco ««■! hi 
t illm» Cigarette, li •elected by 
expert native buyers fttttoeea 
at Xanihl. Shmb, CavaJla 
and Smyrna. 

Fatima U five to one the Weft* 
telling fifteen ecu cig.ircue lO 
the country. 

Simple, l ae npei H tee package* 
but no flner tobacco to used than 
la Fail ma. 



The SMO will tie awnrded June 1, 
1815. In the mean time, nomeofthe 
ads Mihiiiitt.i) will be published 
each mimt h 1 11 1 n]l('«epu'ilii iiluiiis, 
tngi t iii-r « 1 1 li the name and photo- 
graph of the writer— provided the 
writer will s>ivo permission for 
■uch piiiiiiciit.i n. 

For rnch nd no published we will 
pay the writer fl. But. the publi 
cation of an r ad mint not tic taken 
to signify Hint it si .1 mis an y better 
ehanee 10 win the $.'100 than the 
ml b that are not published. 



Those who try to earn thl.« 
|3M should remember that 
the supreme test of any advertise 
nient is it» telling power. Whether 
your ad consists of only ten wards 
— or run* to a thonsnnd — It should 
be interesting;, truthful, convinc- 
ing—it should give to the reader 
the buying impulse. To write 
• uch advertisement*, thai 
will para the test of perfor 
mnnce, the writer must be- 
lieve in the product be Is 
writing about. 



The, are 20 for ISc 



gy^JfauXtumwCU 212 Fifth Ave.. New York 





THE TURKISH BLEND CIGARETTE 4 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. .3, 19 14. 



trustees and undergraduates should 
aspire to leadership in some line of 
work. If this college wishes to he a 
leader, however, it must have a de- 
finite clean-cut purpose. The work 
uf this college is to help solve the 
ural problem and to do all it can to 
help meet the needs of the rural 
population. It may have others. It 
is this that is set before us, however, 
for we receive funds from the state 
treasury, the national government 
and we bear the name of "agricul- 
tural" and the name of the state. 

"Some say this is a narrow and re- 
stricted field, that there is not enough 
to it or any dignity in its work. 
There was a time when agriculture 
was a dispised sister in the business 
world. The agricultural colleges are 
now holding their own. They have 
more men and more leaders. The 
increase in enrollment in the last few 
years has increased 400% while in 
other colleges the increase has been 
but \bfc- Every year a new oppor- 
tunity ariBes for the man trained in 
agriculture. 

"The point is that if we devote all 
our time and energy to make M. A. 
C. a leader in the field, we have a 
job. That job stands for better farm 
ing, better business, better living. It 
is the greatest economic problem of 
today, for the food supply of the 
world is at stake. Iiesides this, one 
half of the population are fanners. 
"There are three methods of ac- 
complishing this. In the research 
work, seen in onr experiment stations, 
the facts and principles of farming 
are being worked out. The exten- 
sion service is one of the ways used 
in spreading these facts ami princi- 
ples to the farmers. This informa- 
tion is an inspiration for knowledge 
to people who need it. The last 
method is teaching agriculture. It is 
the training of rural problem solvers. 
This is the task of leadership that the 
Massachusetts Agricultural college 
has set before us ! " 



of foreigners, and other work of this 
character, but it will also be an ar- 
rangement to help the student body. 
It is proposed to have someone in the 
office all the time so that telephone 
calls may be answered and the per- 
sons found who are wanted. Tele- 
grams will be taken and, if possible, 
delivered instead of being posted on 
the bulletin board where they are 
many times lost before the person 
they are intended for knows about 
them. An employment bureau will 
be established ; fellows desiring work 
can pass in their names and people 
who want fellows to work will al- 
ways know where to obtain them. 
These are only a few of the ways by 
which the association aims to help 
the student body ; others will be de- 
veloped us time goes on. It is hoped 
that as many fellows as possible will 
pay the membership fee of oue dol- 
lar and in this way help obtain the 
olfice. 

Group classes will soon be organ- 
ized, each group being under the 
leadership of I professor and meet- 
ing with him at his home. All who 
are interested are urged to join for it 
is a good opportunity to study social 
life work and to become better ac- 
qaaiated with the different instruc- 
tors. 



score men in each camp were as 
follows : 

Burlington, H. C. Newherry of 
Colgate University ; Asheville, Wm. 
\V. Search; Ludington, Theron G. 
Bethven, University of Minnesota; 
and Presidio of Monterey, Hnlcourt 
Blades, University of California." 



LABHOV1T2! 

Tailor a.m> 1'kksskk. 

dents' Furnishings Dress Suits to 
Rent- Drill (Moves and Collars 

TICKET M-STKM. 

11 x.».i«.N .— « l-lmrae 



High Grade Furnishings 



CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

About fifty members of the Chris- 
tian association enjoyed a very in- 
teresting meeting last Thursday eve- 
ning in the chapel. The meeting 
opened with a Bhort talk by "Dick" 
Powers 1914, last years president of 
the association He said that a few 
minutes spent each week in these 
meetings had helped him to keep 
from acquiring the manners and the 
habits of the men with whom he has 
had to work since last spiiug. He 
advised all college men to attend the 
the meetings regularly, because it 
would not only help them morally but 
it would make their instructors and 
fellow students respect them. 

The need of an office was taken 
np and discussed by several mem- 
bers. The organization needs an 
otlice very much if it is to carry on 
the different lines of work which have 
beta planned for the year. The of* 
flee will not only lw the headquarters 
of the Boy's club work, the teaching 



AGGIES AS MARKSMEN 

[Continued from page i] 

of any kind on rifle ranges since the 
wotk was introduced, a claim that 
could hardly hold good iu connection 
with other prominent school sports 
such as football and baseball. Fur- 
thermore, only a small percentage of 
students can take part in baseball 
and football matches, while the num- 
ber of students who can enter the 
shooting competitions is only limited 
to the caprcity of the range. 

In addition to competing against 
each other in rifle matches, college 
clubs are given annually a medal for 
a members* competition by the 
National Rifle Association. Decora- 
tions are also presented to club mem- 
bers by the War Department for 
qualifying as expert, sharpshooter 
and marksman. The college which 
made the best showing in the number 
of students qualified for the fiscal 
year endisg June 30, 1914, was Cor- 
nell University. The lifle club which 
made the best showing in the number 
of qualifications was the Minnesota 
University Rifle Club which qualified 
96 marksmen, 11 sharpshooters and 
experts. 

At the camps of instruction for 
college students held during the 
Bummer, rifle shooting was one of 
the courses of military training laid 
down. At these camps SI students 
qualified as experts. 111 as sharp- 
shooters and 219 as marksmen. The 
National Rifle Association of Amer- 
ica presented a cup for an intercolle- 
giate team competition and also a 
medal for the student making the 
highest score at each camp. The 
cup was won by Cornell University 
whose four men scored 854. The 
University of California was second 
with H09 and the University of Min- 
nesota third with 782. The high 




K i ... I -Ml 



Travel the country over and you'll not 
find a choicer or a better line of Men's 
Toggery than you'll find right here. 

The best shirt makers, underwear 
makers, scarf makers and glove 
makers send us these productions. 

The Best in Every Line 
is Here. 

Then again, we are not high priced. 
All the patrons of this store know 
this to be a fact. Test us and see. 

See our new Manhattan and Monarch 
Shirts. $1.50 to $2.50. 

Look at our Cloves, $1.00 to $2.50. 

See our Neckwear, 25c to $1.50. 



Two Hundred MacKinaws Now Ready for Your Inspection. 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



Alillnis,! 



NOTICE 1 

Twenty-five cents will be put in a box for the 
NEW ATHLETIC FIELD every time you 
buy shoes at our store costing $3.50 or over. 

VERY LATEST STYLES. 

Shoes for the Drill- $2.50 to $5.00 



nu: 



hoe 



tore 



School and College Photographers . 




LOCALLY: 



5» Center St., Northampton, Mass., 

■nd South Hadley, Mass. 



Main Offics: 

1546-1548 Broadway, 

New York City 



These Studios offer the best skilled 
artists and most complete 

equipment obtainable 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



■DEALERS IN- 



Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 



i 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 13, 1914. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 



PRANK W. BL'ELL'iS. 
TYLER S. ROGERS '16, 
HENRY H. WHITE 'is, 
JAMES A. PRICE'iS, 
E. SUMNER DRAPER '15, 



Editor-in-Chief 

Managing Editor 

Assistant Editor 

Athletic Editor 

Athletic Editor 



THOS.L. HARROCKS'16, Department Editor 
ALFRED A. G10IOSA*i6, Campus Editor 
FRANK A. SCHEUFELE, Alumni Editor 
MILFORD R. LAWRENCE »I7, 

Associate Editor 
RICHARD W. SMITH '17, Associate Editor 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

MAURICE J. CLOUGH '15, Business Manager 
CHAS A. HUNTINGTON, JR. '16, 

Assistant Business Manager 
W. RICHARDSEARS'ij. Advertising Man'g'r 
LESTER E. FIELDING'i6, Ass't Adv. Mgr. 
BIRGER R. ROSEQUIST'17, Circulation 



Subscription #1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable 
to Maurice J. Clouoh. 

Entered ■• second-ctass matter at the Amherst 
Peel Office 



Vol. XXV. Tuesday, Oct. 13. No. 5 

"A gentleman's agreement." 
Thus are the fraternity rules in regard 
to rushing supposed to be. How 
many fraternities during this past 
month have thought of that phrase, 
and how many of the fraternities here 
at college have lived up to those rules 
even with it in mind? 

What are interf rater nity rules 
drawn up for if they are to be broken 
at the first opportunity by fraternities 
who are unscrupulous and who are 
hypocritical, in as much as theyagreed 
to the rules when they were first 
proposed. The rule in regard to ap- 
pointments made forty-eight hours in 
advance was broken numerous times 
throughout the season. It is claimed 
that upperclassmen talked fraternity 
to men after six o'clock Thursday 
night and finally to cap the climax 
two fraternities pledged freshmen 
after Friday morning's chapel who 
did not come out of chapel wearing 
pledge pins. 

The Collegian in this week's issue 
lias published a list of men pledging 
the different fraternities. The names 
of these men who pledged later than 
during chapel exercises are not in- 
cluded. A regular fraternity confer- 
ence meeting is to tie held this Thurs* 
day afternoon when the matter is to 
be token up. For the best interest 
of the college the Collegian hopes 
that it will not be required to publish 
these men's names as being legally 
pledged, after that meeting. These 
men are wearing pledge pins and con- 
aider themselves as pledged. If the 
conference bears out the hopes of the 
Collegian and its own laws it will 
rule that these men cannot be pledged. 
In such a case not only will it be 
necessary for the fraternities to whom 
the men are pledged to defer these 
men's Initiation in February but also 
to call back the pledge and to remove 
their pledge pin as well. These 
freshmen should then understand 
that they are not pledged and cannot 
be until after May 1 . It is np to the 



fraternities affected to do this in the 
right way. Let them see it done 
fairly and squarely. 

Several facts were brought out by 
the recent rushing season and we 
take the liberty of touching upon 
them and offering suggestions to be 
worked over before the next season 
begins. The season, as amended, 
lasted a month and it appeared to be 
about the right length of time. 
Second semester initiation has not 
received its trial as yet but it should 
work out very well. The forty-eight 
hour rule is also a good point if it is 
lived up to by all the fraternities 
rather than a few. 

As suggestions we would offer first 
that the handshake given by a fresh- 
man as a sign of his willingness to 
join a fraternity should most emphati- 
cally be done away with. Once it 
was considered almost a pledge but 
today it is not considered binding. 
It is an argument that is used by 
some fraternities to hold a man. 
Other fraternities do not believe in 
its being at all binding. Between 
these two conflicting opinions a fresh- 
man's morals and thoughts as to 
honestv are due to fall. The onlv 

e */ 

logical way out of this artificial con- 
dition is to do away with the ' 'shake" 
entirely. It is opposite to the real 
meaning of the conference rules and 
serves no purpose to any good. It is 
an antiquated custom that has long 
ago outgrown its usefulness. Let 
us rid ourselves of it. 

The last point that the Collegian 
would offer suggestions as to the 
ultimate bettering of conditions is in 
regard to penalties inflicted for dis- 
obedience of the laws of the confer- 
ence. In its present state the con- 
ference cannot enforce its own rules. 
There are three solutions for this con- 
dition. First let the Senate take 
over the administering of the frater- 
nity rules. A drawback to this is the 
fact that non-fraternity men may be 
on the Senate. Secondly it has been 
suggested that rides regulating frater- 
nity conferences at other colleges be 
used here and the name of the frater- 
nity breaking the rules be published 
in the Collegian and the I»d«? t 
Lastly we would suggest that faculty 
control be used to enforce the confer- 
ence rulings. It is difficult to say 
what form this regulation would take 
but the Collegia* is sure that a safe, 
sane policy would be worked out by 
the faculty. 

The Collegian states, then, those 
conditions and offers these sugges- 
tions to the conference for action and 
to the undergraduates and alumni for 
further thought and suggestions. 



ACCIE MEN 

Require Good Stationery 

Inquire of anyone where to obtain it, and 

Acquire what you need when you correspond — that is 
A Quire of the "Adams' Special 45c a quire " 

Paper that sells elsewhere for 60 cents and more 



GET IT AT 



ADA L£ S\ The REXALL Store 



UNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

K KOI LAIC MONDAY SKKVICK AT 7 H M. 



E. RUSSELL NORTON 

SALES A CENT 

Davenport Miller 
Vein Coal 

Best Quality Pennsylvania Coal 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 

MODERN REPAIR DEPT. 

E.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOFMAN 



BOSTON OFFICE 

85 Water St. 



NEW VORK OFFICE 

1 Hroadway 



Mani of us have noticed the wcedv 
appearance of the pond in the late 
summer and early fall and remarked 
on the large quantities of decaying 
vegetable matter held suspended by 
rank growth. The odor is, at times, 
objectionable. During the last few 
weeks the Polish laborers have been 
busily engaged in cutting out the 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

CURRAN & DYER, Prop*. 
Loose-Leaf Note Books and Fountain 



E. E. MILLETT 

JEWELER and OPTOMETRIST 

Lenses ground while you wait 

College Jbwklky 

Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and Guitar Strings 

AM HE R.ST, MARS. 
Next to Post Office. 



Amherst 

CO-OP LAUNDRY 

High-Grade College Work 



Shirts. 
Collars, 
Cuffs, - 
Plain wash. 
Same, rough dry, 



10-15C 
2 i-ac 

1 I-2C 

48c per doz. 
30c per doz. 



DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, 11.50 a Suit 

K.T. Frost, Agent: D.Sherihvan, Asst. Agent 
— — Try our ticket system 

Put full Bane and address on laundry 



Come to us for 



Fireplace Goods, Coat and Tronser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brashes 



nything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 



Always glad to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUHBIN6 & HEATING GO. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 13, 1914. 



The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

Jobbers of Wrought Iron and Brass Pipe, Valves 
ind Fittings for Steam, Water and Gas. Asbestos 
,ind Magnesia Boiler and Pipe Coverings, Pipe 
Cut to Sketch, Mill Supplies. Engineers and 
Contractors for Steam and Hot Water Heating, 
Automatic Sprinkler Systems, Boiler and Engine 
Connections. • Holyoke, Mass. 



Reserved *o«* 



BECKMAN 



■ 1 < • • > > 1 > 



tow PRICE TAILORING CO. 

SUITS MADE TO ORDER 

>mts ("leaned. Pressed and Dved All kinds of 
Kf pairing tor Ladies and Gentlemen neatlv done. 
High-grade work by first class tailor. 'Work 
called for and delivered. Sell tickets for pressing, 

4 SUITS FOR «i ;o 

GEORGE KOTOWITZ, PROP. 

Main Street. Amherst. Mass. Nash Block 
On your way to the Posi Office Tel. 4$ W 



FLEMINGS SHCE STORE 



Northampton 



For particular people 

THE ELMS RESTAURANT 

213 Main St., Northampton 

(War Amhetst cii line) 

* Quality Re*t?urant al Moderate 
Prices. 



TRY OUR SPECIALS 

And a la carte service. 

OYSTERS STEAKS CHOPS 
FRIED CHICKEN, ETC. 



Open 6 a. m. to 1 1 i\ It. 



FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

Grown by the Horkulttiral Dept . 

We offer our surplus stock of cut 
I riowers and plants at reasonable rates 
to students and faculty. This stock 
is grown in modern houses under 
ideal conditions, Roses, carnations, 
violets, chrysanthemums and sweet 
[peas in season. 

GkOWN ON THE CAMPUS 

I ■ 1. ,.li«.,ii SOO 



EBSTER'S STUDIO 

Everything in Photograph; 

Including Framing. 
Good work speaks for Itself. 
«t Block, Amherst, Mass. 



weedy growth. Perhaps this rough 
and ready appearance of the pond, 
the odor and hard work might he 
avoided iu other ways. For example 
the Green Hill park in Worcester 
had a pond in a condition similar to 
ours. The commissioners put in 
Beveral'hatchings of German carp, a 
distinctive vegetable feeding fish. 
Today the pond is a clear mirror of 
pure crystal without the least whiff 
of an unpleasant oder. The exper- 
iment might be tried out here and be 
successful. Climatie and water con- 
ditions are probably equal. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

[Notices for this column should be dropped in 

the (' i.i'A Office or handed to Alfred A' 

Gioiosa' 16, on or Itefore the ->.it unl;iv preceding 
each issue. 1 

Oct. 11 — 1-10 i'. m. Assembly, John 
M. Tyler, Amherst col- 
lege. 

Oat, i;,_fi-4-) v. M. M. A. C. C. A. 

in chapel. 
Oct. 17— Football. Colby at Port- 
land, Me. 

Fresh men vs. Holyoke 
High school at Holyoke. 

Oct. JO — 7-00 !•. H. Stoekbridge 
Club in South College. 

Oct. 21 — 1-10 i\ m. Assembly, Mr. 
Kdwin I). Mead. The 
World Peace Foundation, 
Boston. 



CROSS COUNTRY RUN 

One of the foremost events of the 
next week will be the cross-country 
run ou Saturday. The race is going 
to be unusuallv interesting this vear 
because large squads are out, making 
competition keen. The course, be- 
ing over bill and dale as it is, will (It 
the men much more for the New Eng- 
land Intercollegiate than would an 
onlinnry road ,raee such as hits hem 
1 un in former years. 

The date of the meet with Amherst 
is not yet definitely settled, but it 
will probably be on the 24lh since 
this is the only Saturday which is 
open. Such a meet ought to mean a 
victory for M- A. C again this year. 
Besides having a large ami promising 
squad, our team is putting in more 
consistent preparation than are the 
Amherst men. 

The other two cross-country dates 
are now definitely settled. Saturday 
Nov. 17, sees the team running 
against the l' Diversity ofi Vermont at 
Burlington. Though Vermont un- 
doubtedly has a good team, she did 
not enter the Intercollegiate* at Dart- 
month last year, so the M. A. C. 
squad should bring home the bacon 
from the Green Mountain state. 

Tin New England Intercollegiate 
comes Nov. II. Tb* place of the 
meet has not ret oeen decided. It 
will be tie hardest race of the year 
for the squad, but the experience of 
but year, together with the experi- 
ence of the coarse of this coming Sat- 
urday, should be factors to help our 
boys and made their chances bright. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 



Mr. Campion has just returned from England with the 

AQUASCUTUM 

OVERCOATS 

Weils-Margetson Neckwear, Caps & Knitted Vests 

On account of war it will not be possible to get any more of 
these goods, so an early inspection will be to your advantage. 




Fine Tailoring Men's Furnishings 

See Our Agents 



Hubbard's BasE Fertilizers 

the most economical you can use. 

BetteR crops 



.....M»i"m.tfc^... 



Ba.e; 



*EfmLYZ&& 



are the inevitable result. 



THE ROGERS & HUBBARD COMPANY, Middletown, Conn. 

"Iliii' mill Work*, I'm I lurul. Conn. 



W\ J O ] are supplied every year 

Burpee s oeeds direct to ,n ° rc Amcri - 

MT can planters than are 

the seeds of any other growers. Do you know Burpee- 
Quality "Seeds that Grow" ? If not, we would like to 
make your acquaintance. Simply send us your address 
(a postal card will do) and you will receive Burpee's 
Annual for 1914, — a bright new book of 1 82 pages, which 
is recognized as "The Leading American Seed Catalog." 
Kindly write to-day! Address 

W. ATLEE BURPEE & CO., Burpee Buildings, Philadelphia 



F. A. SHERARD 

MEN'S STORE 



Use our new cash discount card 
and save five per cent on 

SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING 

Furnishings and Custom Tailoring- 



C&rptrvter & Morehousf, 

PRINTERS, 



No, i, Cook PUce, 



Amhrr.it, Mas*. 



i 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 13, 1914. 



THE 



Hoover & Smith Co. 

616 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 
Diamond Merchants 

Philadelphia's Official Fraternity Jeweler 

SPECIALISTS IN 
Fraternity Badges, Fobs, Novelties, 

Rings, Charms Prizes Trophies. 

Medals College Pins, Fobs, Seals' 

Rings, Charms.% 



"SCOTTIE" 
H. HOOPER 

Will dean and press your clothes so you 

will be satisfied. It rosts no more 

and he is nearer to "Aegie." 

MHRRAI- TICKET SYSTRM 

Under Columbia Cafe 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Now at 13 Pleasant St. 
Oculists' Prescriptions Killed. liroken Lenses 
Accurately Replaced. Fine Watch Repairing 
Promptly and iikilfully Done. 

Satisfaction Ouaranteed 



E. B. DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hours: o to 12 A. m.. 1-30 to 5 p. M. 



STEAM Kl I TING. Telephone 59— K 

GAS PITTING. TINNING. 

F. W. DANCE & CO., Plumbers 

Specialty of Repairing 

Church WTxoows, Memorial 

WlNIMiWS. LKAI> LIGHTS. &C. 



<. C littnn * v* 



^ UHFR^T. MASS. 



THE TKKI'SV I'AULOW 

fj|«MSl«g IT^KflnR- R.pnlrluK 

in... U. . 1 nrrvii'o. K«-»t Work l.HWrat Prl«-. 
Ml w>>ik cavefullv dnne. Work called for and 
delivered. BfOW' ov^rcon'",. suits. Dants an^ 
coats Ladies' Hne lm»»i nutta a specialty 
Teams will call every day at M. A. C. 

\VH. Mt \NKI.IN. Prop. 
Hear N'ash Rr*a. Amh<*r«t Tel. No. Ml- 



Now is the time to be planning for 

FraternityGroups 

Have them taken at 

MISS McCLELLAN'S STUDIO 



41 State Street. 



Northampton, Miss 



THE 
SMOOTHEST TOBACCO 

s b the moony mght with pipe and V^wt 
—that's enjoyment enough tof tome ot ua. 

Velvet tobacco-&e finest leaf fa to great toU™ 
country-hung b big warehouses for over 2 WJ-a 
mellowing procea. knpossiWe to ^^^^l 
little by 1\H can change the kaf^hrnmate «*»««*- 
n* (Vou cafl it buel). Every putf c4 Velvet take, ore, 
2 yeafl to produce — no won- 
der it's good. 



Full Two 

Ounce Tins 



r oa>j 



CAMPUS NOTES 
It has been necessary to postpone 
the Phi Kappa Phi address which) 
was to have been delivered at the j 

I 

weekly Assembly Wednesday, Oct. | 
Hth. In place of this address Prof. | 
John M. Tyler of Amherst college 
will speak. 

The class of 1916 has elected as its 
Junior Prom committee the following 
men : H. VV. Bishop of Doylestown, 
Pa. ; N. U. Blanpied of Framing- 
ham ; W. S. Coiey of Wilton, Conn. ; 
B. A. Gilinore of Acushnet ; C. E. 
Hathaway of Somerset ; C. W. Moses 
of Ticonderoga, N. R. ; F J. Scheu- 
fele of South Natick. The commit- 
tee has not yet elected its chnirnmn. 
Major John Anderson, U. S. A., 
retired, died at his home in Belcher* 
town, on Aug. 27th. Major Ander- 
son came to Aggie in 19(11, as pro- 
fessor of military science. There 
had been a vacancy in this depart- 
ment at that time from 18U8 when 
Lieutenant Wright was withdrawn 
at the outbreak of the war with Spain. 
When Major Anderson resigned hi* 
post in 1906 he had thoroughly laid 
the foundations for the splendid de- 
velopment of the M. A. ( . military 
department under Captain Martin. 
It is not disrespectful to the major's 
memory to say that his college nick- 
name of "lllokie". originated ob- 
scurely in the brain of some keen- 
witted student, will ever bring to the 
mind of those alumi who knew him, 
the pleasing personality and strongly 
marked character, of this brave 
soldier, able instructor and sincere 
friend. 

The following appeared In the 
Boston Herald recently: '•Prefer- 
ring to atav in the little town of By- 
field for a while ami to rest on the 
lauiels he won when he broke the 

Intercollegiate half-mile record at 

the Harvard stadium last way. Have 
S. Caldwell, the Cornellian. an- 
nounces he will not do any running 
until the middle of August. Then 
he intends tO represent the Koston 
Athletic Association, lie will com- 
pete for the Inicorn club at the 
National A. A. V. track ami field 
championships at Baltimore in Sep- 
tember. Caldwell has not put on a 
running shoe since the afternoon he 
beat 'Ted* Meiedith of Pennsylvania 
and George S. Brown of Yale in 1 m. 
ii.'l j}-.'i s. and scattered the old i •■<•- 
ord, held by John Paul Jones of Cor- 
nell. Caldwell is wrapped up in 
farming, having graduated from the 
agricultural school of Cornell I'niver- 
sitv with honors." 



succesful forward pass on the 30- 
yard line in the first period. The end 
runs of the home team that proved so 
successful against the freshmen were 
easily stoppedednnd the only gaining 
play* was a delayed pass. Williston 
was successful with two forward 
passes while the scrubs failed to work 
any. The features of the game were 
the playing of Finlay and Chapman 
for Wfllislon and that of Bolles for 
the visitors. 



The line-up. 

W1LI.ISTON. M. 

Chapman, le 
Lankan, It 
Heizu^, ig 
Ucvaii), c 
Gi aiiey, rg 
(i raily, rt 
i..u kuien, re 
Keating, qb 
r'mluy, Capi., rtib 
Sweeney, Howe, il>!> 
Minus, in 

Touchdown- Keating 



A. C. SECONDS. 

re, William* 

rt, Hagclsiem 

rg, r uller 

c, Veiueck 

lg, Hamster 

it, Kicker 

le, hauler 

qi», Kich 

IIik, Holies 

i In, Mack 

to, Lime 

Goal trom 



W£- 



One ounce Dags S ce n ta — con ve nie n t for cigarette amoke r* 



S1C0HDS 10SE 

Evenly matched but with the breaks 
favoring the home team, the Massa- 
chusetts second team went down to 
defeat before the Williston seminal y 
team at Eaathampton Saturday. The 
game was hard fought throughout, 
and the scrubs were dangerous until 
the final whistie blew. Willision's 
one touchdown was the result of a 



touchdown- (irady. Keierec- W'.ureii. 
Tnue - io-miiiutc quaitei*. 

loiO INDEX 
See here, Freshmen '. before you 
blow away your next live spot, you 
just stop and think a minute. You'll 
need that little greenback to get an 
Index. Now don't get cold feet ; the 
Judex won't lake all that, but it will 
lake some of it. and il you don't luy 
that bill aside for the lime being so 
that yon cau trot it out next Decem- 
ber, you'll experience the most aggra- 
vating regret of your college course. 
If you dou't kuow what an Index is 
gel a hump on and find out. Ask 
someone who knows, don't go to the 
dictionary and swallow whal il says 
al)OUt an Index being "a table for 

facilitating references.'' The best 

way to find out is to Imy one: remem- 
ber we sell them — we tlo not keep 
them. You cau buy one and keep it 
ami l>e glad of it j now wake up ! 

Now, you rah rah SopACMOTOSi JOS 
may have taught the freshmen how lu 
pull rope, but you've got one more 
thing to learn, and that is, whal 
a good Indix really looks like. 
You'd Hop over if you ever set c\» a 
on our hide-bound volume. Hide- 
bound f Why yes, it has a leather 
cover. When the sales manager 
thumps \ou on the back to take your 
order, don't let him have to ask you 
a second line, Get right into the 
rUefa and show yourselves alive. 

|tfl6 attention ! As usual you are on 
the inside again, looking out, while 
the other rustics are "rauged arouud" 
gazing in on you. Now, your pictures 
may form a pretty good rogue's gal- 
lery, but they dou't take up the whole 
book. There are some surprises in 
this book for you ; things you never 
thought of. We can get you all 
guessing on whom this quotation fits, 
'♦All It — broke loose." There's not- 
one of you who knows what **Cud" 
had to say about "My Last Duchess," 
ami there's only one place iu the 
world to find out and that is in the 
///«/»./•. ( >h, it's a corker, it's a corker. 
Don't mow the long green too close 
for the next few days. Stop and 
think how it will seem to have a 
regular book on the library table that 
is guaranteed not to gather dust 
while there are people who can rend 
within a radios of ten feet of it. 

-BE THERE." 

Senior*, here's your last chance to 
get yon reel ves into print in a college 
annual. You want one more first 
class A 1 Index before you go, and 
here's your last chance. The 
European War positively has not 
raised the price of Ivdexe* to any 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 13*1914. 



OVER OS YEARS* 
EXPERIENCE 




Trade Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights Ac. 

AnTone sending a nketr >■ and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whetuor an 
invention Is probably patentable. Ctmimuiilcn- 
tions strictly confidential. HANDBOOK on Patents 
sent free. Oldest aaeney lor securing patents. 

Patents taken tin oUku Munn & Co. receive 
special notice, without charge, in the 

Scientific American. 

A handsomely illnstrat cd weekly. J,nnre»t clr 
culation of any scientific Journal. Terns, S3 a 
year: four ruoiiths, $L Sold by all newsdealers. 

IHllNNSCo^^-'Newyork 

Brand Office. 625 F St* Washington. D. C 

Batchelder & Snyder Co. 

PACKERS, POULTKV DRKStiKKS 

AND r.i i I i t: H.tKKUS. 

WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

Bed, Mutton, l.amb. Veal, Pork, Lard, Hams, 

Bacon, Sausages. Poultry, (June, Butter 

Cheese, Eggs, Beans. 

( ) lice St Stor** i}.5so7, j<J. >i & 63 Blackstone St. 

Iloston. Packing douse, Brighton, Mass. 

N.itt/e Poultry Ores-ting Plant, Boston. 

Creameries in Vermont. 



WOOF-WOOF 

Mac, howse your dog ? 
Dan, I did, 

Ha — ha, 
And another puppy bit 

the dust. 



Dt LAVAL 

as superior to other separa- 
tors as other separators are 
to gravity creaming. 




Ol HER 5EPAKATOKS SKIM cleaner 
than is possible on tile average with gravitv 
creaming, and De Laval Cream Separators 
ikim as much closet still thin other separa- 
tors, particularly under the harder condition* 
of cool milk, running heavy cream or sepa- 
rating the milk of stripper cows. 

<>THEK SEPARATORS IAVE 1 IIKIK 
coit every year, as a rule, over gravity cre.im 
Ing, and De Laval Separators save their cost 
every year over other separators and last from 
MR to twenty years, or on an average five 
times as long as other Mparafen. 

WHV WOT SOLVE IT NOW IS* THE 
only sure and safe wat potable f If you haven't 
a separator, buy a D« Laval. If you haVe a 
poor separator, replace it with a De Laval. 



THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR CO. 

New York Chicago San Francisco 



abnormal figure. You'll be getting 
more than your money's worth by just 
telling the business manager thai you 
are ready to take a copy. WATCH 
THIS COLUMN FROM WEKK 
TO WEEK. 



FRESHMAN FOOTBALL 

After a week of hard drilling and 
COoSwUSt scrimmage, together with 
Coach Gore to urge them ou, the 
Freshman football team met the 
husky Worcester Academy eleven at 
Worcester, only to go down to de- 
feat by the overwhelming score of 
'jy-0. * It was Worcester Academy 
from start to finish ; the Freshmen 
divided honors only in men hurt. 

The summary ; 



WORCESTER. 
Coggswell le, 
H, Robertson I j 
Ackerman \ ' 

Akerman Day, / lg, 

M eyers ) 

Morse Habcock c, 
Mitchell Cole rg, 
Munyon rt, 
( harder I le, I 

Dale J re, \ 

M alone 1 

Ryan, Bernnan, ( qb, 
Hower Cady lhb, 



M. A. C. '18 

re, Burch 

rg, Weeks, Holmes 

rg, I Hawley, 
I Carter 

c Tilton 

lg, Sullivan 

It, Roberts 

Weeks, Sawer, 

MtKee 

ql>, \ Grayson, 

I Chambers 

rhl>, Grayson 



Davol Fitzpatrick rhb, lhb, Sawyer 

Bourne J. Robertson lb, 11), Yesair 

Score: Worcester Academy 99. Touch- 
downs, Bower 2, Bourne, Davnl, Melone 
2, Ryan a, Cady, Brennan, Cogswell, 
Robertson 2, Munyon. (ioals from 
touchdowns, Munyon 12. Goal from 
field, Munyon. Umpire, Larkin of Holy 
Cross. Referee, Johnson of Springfield 
Linesmen, Jones of Harvard. Time, 
10m. and 12m. periods. 



RAHAR'S INN 

Northampton. Massachusetts 
TWO SLOCKS 1 m.im 1 111 !.n-( • 1 

The hotel where there is comfort (with- 

out extravagance.) More popular 

than ever. 

Special Luncheon 12—3 P. M. 

RIVATE DININC ROOMS 

Ala Carte Service 

i r,.m (, -HI to || P.M. 



NEW MEN IN FRATERNITIES 

[Continued from page ij 

8. B. Ferris, New Mdford. Conn. 
A. L. Frellick, Kverett. it* 
J. W. Ingalls, Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Sidney C. Johnson. Gloucester. 
Wesley Sawyer. .lamaica Plain. 
John Vickers, Deerlield. 
L. W. Wilbur. South Middlcboro. 
A. L. Cnderwood, Stow. 

TIIKTA cm. 
C. S. limit h. New Bedforti. 

E. S. Faber, Plainlield, N. J. 
L. IL Patch, Wenham. 

C. \i. Phipps, Dorchester. 
II . L. Russell, Worcester. 
W. II. Mi Kee, Chelsea. 

-IliMA I'HI KI'.XII.ON. 

Amoa Allen, Da I ton. 

F. K. Baker, Fail haven. 
W. R. Loring, Housatonic. 
A. M. Howard, Pittafleld. 

R. W. Hurlburt, Ashley Falls. 
W. H. Robinson, Lynn. 

LAMBDA OBI ALPHA. 

H. B. Capen, Canton. 
Thomas E. Carter, Andover. 
E. S. Bennett, Blackstone. 

D. O. Edes, Bolton. 
R. W. Foster, Lynn. 

W. S. Goodwin, "Haverhill. 
Walter Fletcher, Newton. 
Donald McKechnle, Sharon. 
T. B. Mitchell, Needhaa, 
C. R. Raymond, Beverly. 

G. N. Sch lough, Walthara. 
C. S. Smith, W. Nawtoo. 

ALPHA 1IQMA PHI. 

H. II Baxter. Brighton. 
Roger Chambers, Dorchester. 
N. 0. Durfee, Fall River. 
Forrest Grayson, Miiford. 
G. C. Howe, Worcester. 
C. F. Kennedy, Miiford. 
J.J. Maginms, Lawrence. 
Alfred Sedgwick, Fall River. 
H. L. Sullivan, Lawrence. 
Ralph Sutherland, Cambridge. 



Che pheasant 

Bmttfi St., amberat 

Breakfast, Luncheon, 
Afternoon Tea. 

Dinner if arranged for. 

Telephone 470 

Rooms for Transients. 



Ti Teachers Exchange 




An Especially Oood Commission Proposition- 
Cash for test orders— Artiele widely Advertised— 
Cuts down expense in powrr I funis— Address 

Enuinekkini; Stiri'i v Co., 2138 N. c*h Sticet. 
Philadelphia, Ha. 



Of lhston 



120 BoflltOH St. 



* They're not short-lived 

The Jerseys 

In I9t3 eighteen Jersey 
cows were oTluailv tested 
which avcragrd 12 years 

;i -id 7 tiKiniiisiii ai-o. Their 
average milk production 
vasS 1 pounds. Average 
battel I t, o. 7 pounds. One 
of tlu e tews was over 18 
yens old. 

longevity, Can?ti fu* on i"-* Fronomtc 
Production an; j-rs.y tiai..-ieustici». 

AstTJtlCdN JtSSEY fATTI K CLUB 
324 W. ii* Si.. New York City 




Recommends Teachers, Tutors and Schools 



MgMgET ljj 



NON-LEAK ABLE 



f l^^VllT^^-^ 1 -^ — ^ FOUNTAIN PEN 
Ml I [5S^^*Minimize your fountain pen 

W V ^^^ troubles by owning a Moore's. C It Is the ' 
#/ ^^ safest, soundest and most dependable pen known. 
~ Cits strength lies in Its very simplicity. Nothing 
finiky to get out of order. C Vou can give your- 
self no better treat than a Moore's Non-leakable. /i 

For Sale by Dealers Everywhere 

American Fountain Pen Company 

Adams, Cushlna & Foster, Solllnu Agents 
16S DEVONSHIRE STREET :: :: BOSTON, MASS. 



E. Frank Coe Fertilizers 

1QC7 THE BUSINESS FARMERS" STANDARD 1Q1/1 
lOO/ FOR OVER FIFTV-FIVE YEARS 1^14 




Do You Raise 300 Bushels of Polatoes per Acre? 

^|HREE hundred bushels per acre is 
not an unusual yield by any means, 
but did you get it this year ? 
rif you were planning to raise 300 
bushels of potatoes to the acre how 
far apart would you space your rows? 

How far apart would you drop the seed pieces in 

the row? 

flHow much fertilizer would you use to grow 300 
bushels of potatoes per acrer How would you 
apply it ? 

tJAre you sure that your seed potatoes are true to 
name and true to type ? 

•JWhat are you doing to prevent "scab," and early 
and late blight ? 

<]|Did you have a short crop of potatoes because of 
dry weather ? Have you decided how you will 
overcome this trouble in the future ? 

C.AI1 these practical points, sod many more, are folly covered an our 
new book 

"Potatoes: A Money Crop*' 

which will be sent free to every potato grower who requests ■ copy, and 

mentions this paper. 

tJThis book is written by a nan who himself has bed years of experience as 

a potato grower, and who has made a careful study of the best methods of 

other growers. 

<JH you read this huok you will keep it for future reference. It is a "worth 

while" publication. 



The Coe-Mortimer Company 

SI CHAMBERS STREET, NEW YORK CITY 



8 






i 
4 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 13, 1914. 



JOIN THE BUNCH AT 

EPSTEIN'S TAILORING PARLORS 

N«iw located over post office. Up one flight 

Pressing and Cleaning a Specialty 

Liberal Ticket System TeL;}6M 

SHOE STORE 

Shoes Repaired by Machinery 

SHOE SHINE 

Open Sunday from 7-13, On your way to H. 0. 



The Highland Hotel 

Corner of Hillman and Uarnes Streets, three 
blocks from the Union Depot, is a modern hos- 
telry run on the European Flan. It is just a step 
from Main Street, away from the noise and dust 
and yet in the center of the business district. 

Its rooms are well furnished and comfortable, 
having a telephone and hot and cold runnint- 
water in every room. Hi ices Wl and up; rooms 
with bath (single) lll.SU and up. 

Its excellent cuisine and well ventilated dining 
room makes a meal a pleasant memory— every- 
thing of the highest quality, well cooked and 
served in the best possible manner. 

Stay at the Highland Hotel once and you will 
anticipate staying there again. Music every 
evening. 

D. H. SIEVERS, 



Highland Hotel, 



.Sprlngrlelil, tin — . 



STUDEHTFUBHITUBE 

RUGS 

CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 

E. D. MARSH ESTATE 




COX SONS 



— AND — 



VINING 



71-74 Madison Avenue. New York 

CAPS AND GOWNS 

Best Materials and Workmanship 



WOODWARD 



LUNCH 

17 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 




LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Child mly from r A. M. to 4 AM. 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Offers courses uf instruction in twenty six teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairyimg 

Poultry Husbandry 



Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 

Agricultural Chemistry 



Economic Entomology 

Microbiology 

Plant Physiology and Pathology 

Agricultural Education 

For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYQN L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



Joint Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics, 

If. A. C. Athletic Fie'd Association, 

The College Senate, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association. 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Hi tie club, 

Roister Doisters 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Fifteen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Sixteen Index, 

M. A. C. Christian Association, 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Stockbridge Club. 



.1. F. Nicholson, Prod 



Philip H. Smith, Secretary 

C. S. Hicks, Treasurer 

E. Towne, Piesiden* 

J. A. Price, Manager 

S. Prouty, Manager 

E. F. Clark, Manager 

E. S. Draper, Manager 
II. Bishop, Manager 

H. M. Upton, President 

Doing and Business Manager 

F. A. Anderson, Manager 

H. M. Rogers, Manager 

L. E. Fielding, Manager 

H. H. White, President 

•I. K. Harper, President 

F. W. Buell, President 
P. F. Whitmore, Presideut 



There are Seven Good Keasons whv ynushuuld 
buy your 

COAL 

or 

C. R ELDER 



Stationery, Newspapers, 
Magazines and Col- 
lege Supplies 

A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer. 



The Connecticut Yalley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Mt., alongside the 
famous Bloody Brook battle ground 
to Old Deerfield, thence to Green- 
field, Turners Falls and across the 
"Plains" to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 

50 Miles of Trackage - Hodern 
Equipment - Train Dispatch- 
ing System— Freight and Ex- 
press Service over entire line. 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway 

Company 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of "Gold Medal Uniforms. " 
1424-1426 Chestnut St.. Philadelphia, Pa 



FOUNTAIN PENS 

Moore's Swan's 

Waterman's 

Thirty-six dozen pens to select from. 

— OUR RULE 

"Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded." 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



KsTiHi.iaii>.ii I HII'J 

St kphbn Lank Folger 

MANUFAlTUKINd .IKWKI.KK 

180 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 



OL.UH AND < 01,1.1;. , 1 . 
l'INS AND KINGS «* 

<*<>!.!>. SIL.VMR AND HKONZH MHIML8 




Wriglit <3ts Dltaon 

Containing Prices and Styles of 

Base Ball, Lawn Tennis, (iolf and 
General Athletic Goods — IS OUT 

The Wright & Ditson Base Ball Uniforms 

are better than ever this year. Managers 

should write for samples and prices. 

Catalogue FltKK to auy address 

WMIGHT 4e D1THON 

344 Washington St.. Boston, Mass. 



CARS 



Leave AGGIE COLLEGE for MOL- 
YOKE at 45 min. past the hour. 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST for AGGIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mln. past the hour. 

Special Care at Raaaonabl* Rate* 



AMHERST & SUNDERLAND SI. RY. CO 



For a Daily and Sunday Newspaper 

You should Read 

• 

THE 

Springfield Republican 

While you are at college in Amherst. 

It ha» all of Tfce M. A. C. News 

The Beat Sporting News 

Kull General Mew* 

A Strong Editorial Pag* 

Interesting Features 

It Is a Real Newspaper 

Daily, 3 cents ; 70 cents a month ; $2.00 
a quarter. 

Sunday 1 $ cents; 50 cents a quarter. 

Subscribe by mail or through the Atsherst News- 
dealer. 






MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXV. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, October 20, 1914, 



No. 6 



SEASON'S FIRST INFORMAL 
ONLY SPARSELY ATTENDED 

Thirty-five Couples Hake up Total of 

Dancers at Saturday Night 

Event. 



ONLY HARD WORK FOR 

TEAM TILL TUFTS GAME 



But Scrubs will Stack up Against 

Y. M. 0. A. Seconds Here on 

Saturday. 



ASSEMBLY AUDIENCE HEARS 
PROF. TYLER OF AMHERST 



Small vet successful , the informal 
held Saturday afternoon and evening 
in the Drill hall marked the opening 
of the social life at M. A. C. On 
other similar occasions, this being the 
twelfth consecutive year that in- 
formal* have been held in the Drill 
hall, an unusually large attendance 
celebrated the opening. None, how- 
ever, was more enjoyable and suc- 
cessful than Saturday's. The unset- 
tled and dreary weather, the lack of 
outside entertainment, and the near- 
ness of the Tufts game kept not a 
few from attending. A good sup'per 
at the dining hall and exceptionally 
good music furnished by the orchestra 
offset the other difficulties, and every- 
body spoke of a very enjoyable lime. 
The ball was artistically deco- 
rated, the variation from former 
informals in this line making it es- 
pecially pleasant. Long strip* of 
maroon bunting hung from the cen- 
ter of the ceiling, and radiating to 
all parts of the ball, produced the 
pleasing effect of an enormous arch. 
The orchestra, placed squarely in the 
center, was partly hidden with palms, 
while the Stars and Stripes and a Mass- 
achusetts State flag curtained the west 
door of the Drill hall, thus demand- 
ing the attention of all who entered. 
The customary electric-lighted maroon 
M was at the south of the hall, and 
numerous pennants and banners 
decorated the walls, adding the fin- 
ishing touches to the effect. 

The patronesses of the occasion 
were 1 Mrs. Hicks and Mrs. Story of 
M. A. C, Mrs. Schafnw of Mt. Hol- 
yoke college and Mrs. Orcutt and 
Mrs. Parker of Smith college. Those 
who attended were : 

1915— W. H. Haskell, R. L. Mc- 
Kechnie, W. C. Kennedy, P.Hildreth, 
A. Johnson, D. J. Lewis. W. H. 
Sears, M. C. Lane, V. L. Severence, 
H. H. Archibald, G. F. Hyde, H. H. 
White, and W. Hatfield. 

191S— H. W. Bishop, F. A. Ander- 
son, Selkregg, C. E. Hathaway, C. 
H. Fernald, H. G. Mattoon, K. B. 
I.aird, J, F. Nicholson and C. A. 
Huntington. 

1917— D. S, Dinsmore, L. T. 
Buckman, W. F. Butter, C. H. Hal- 
lett, T. S. Dillon and L. C. Schaefer. 

I Continued OB page 6 J 



Former M.AC. Inatructor Inspires His 

Hearers with Spirited Address 

on "Leadership." 



On Oct. 24, the varsity has no 
game schedule. All the time up to 
Nov. 1 will be devoted to hard 
practise for the Tufts game. The 
line-up for the Tufts game is rather 
unsettled and there will be strong 
competition for many of the positions. 

Whorf, who has been out of the 
game so far this season with au injury 
showed up well at fullback Saturday. 
Darling and Palmer have been play- 
ing a steady game in the buck field. 
GrayBon is available as either an end 
or halfback, while Boles is a strong 
contender for a back field position. 
Plaisled who played tackle on Satur- 
day will probably be'shifted to end, 
with Day and Higginbotham also 
available as ends. Filling the posi- 
tion of tackles is an uncertain ques- 
tion. Curran will probably be able 
to fill one tackle position as his injury 
is practically healed. The other 
tackle position lies between Schlot- 
terbeck and Danforth. Sehlot- 
terbeck has been bothered by his leg 
which is improving but slowly. 
There is a possibility of Perry being 
shifted to tackle and Danforth or 
Dunn used as guards. Dale played 
almost the entire game at Portland 
and should be in his old form shortly. 
It is impossible to prophesy the line- 
up of the team, as any of the above 
mentioned changes may take place. 
The Y- M. C. A. college of Spring- 
field will send its second team to meet 
the M. A. C. seconds on the campus 
Saturday afternoon, Oct. *24. A 
warmly contested game is expected 
as both teams are evenly matched. 



COLBY WINS GAME IN MUD 
MAKING SINGLE TOUCHDOWN 



Maine College Men Hammer Through 

After Aggie's Desperate Attempt 

at a Check. 



WAR PAMPHLET BOX 

Unusually interesting war news is 
filed in Hie library, including copies 
of the "Great White Papers," a well- 
turned discussion of the German 
point of view in the "Vaterland," 
notable pamphlets of the Germanistic 
society of Chicago, and other histor- 
ical tracts, Mr. Green has again 
grasped the opportune moment and 
compiled an extremely vivid series of 
war periodicals for college ose. 
Everyone in college should avail 
himself of this excellent opportunity 
to become well informed on the 
titanic struggle and vast issues of 
tin- present war in Europe. 



Prof. John Mason Tyler, professor 
of biology and philosophy at Am- 
herst College, and a former instructor 
at M. A. C, was the speaker intro- 
duced to the student body at Assem- 
bly Wednesday afternoon. The Phi 
Kappa Phi address, which was orig- 
inally scheduled for this time, was 
postponed Professor Tyler took as 
a subject for his address the watch- 
word of the year, "Leadership," ami 
his talk was one of the most interest- 
ing of the year thus far. He spoke 
in part as follows : 

"There is no other more import- 
ant, and no other more interesting 
subject than * Leadership,* and at the 
request of your president I shall give 
vou a few thoughts which come to 
me. 

"Why did the state of Massachu- 
setts found this college, if not that 
it might have leaders? Why do men 
come here, if not to become leaders? 
Again, why does the community sup- 
port the institution so well If not 
that it may produce men who shall 
be leaders in this community ? 

"Theee is no period in life when a 
roan is more open to thought tending 
toward leadership than at the age of 
college men— at your age. To begin 
with, every one of you is a hero- 
worshipper, although perhaps uncon- 
sciously. Now why do we love and 
worship a hero? It is because that 
hero has embodied in himself your 
and my ideal* of our inward life. We 
want to be like him, and do as he 
did, think as he thought. In this 
we are striving and struggling that 
we also may embody the same ideals. 
Our ideals differ greatly, and onr 
heroes go wide apart, as a general, 
a statesman, writer, discoverer, 
prophet, and so on. 

"If we are to be leaders, if we are 
to realize this ideal which we have of 
life, we must imitate our heroes and 
thereby become others' heroes, from 
one generation to another. No one 
line of leadership can be recom- 
mended to all alike. We aU may be 
leaders, but each must follow his 
own ideal, and worship his own hero. 
In other words, you must lead your 
own life. 

"A man may think that he favors 



[Continued on paga «>] 



Saturday afternoon, on a wet, 
muddy gridiron amidst a steady 
downpour, Colby hammered her way 
through the Massachusetts line for a 
single touchdown ; this, the sole tally 
of the day being made during the 
second quarter, after Aggie had held 
Colby twice for downs under the 
shadow of her own goal posts. Port- 
land, Maine, was the scene of this 
muddy battle, advertised as "the 
only college football game of the 
year in Portland." A drizzling rain 
prevented thousands of spectators 
from witnessing the contest between 
the Maine and the Massachusetts 
teams, only a moderate-sized crowd 
being present, A small group of 
Aggie alumni watched the game, 
among w hom were noticed Blab- *&C 
andPellett'U. 

On the whole the game was a dis- 
appointment to the M. A. C. sup- 
porters. Colby outrusbed M. A. C, 
making 16 first downs to our six- 
two of the latter being the result of 
tiff side penalties inflicted on Colby. 
In open play, Colby was more suc- 
cessful than Massachusetts, working 
three successful forward passes 
out of six attempts for a total of 4!> 
yards. Aggie's attempts in that 
direction resulted in one successful 
forward out of six attempts for 
a 10 yard gain. The qnick Aggie 
shifts were rendered less effective 
than usual by the insecure footing of 
the field. The Massachusetts back- 
field was lacking in drive in its offen- 
sive work, and was slow in diagnos- 
ing toe Colby attack. Palmer inter- 
cepted two forward passes, running 
one back through a broken field for 
a 30 yard gain, making the longest 
run of the day. Whorf, a new man 
at fullback, gained more ground 
from rushing than the othei backfield 
men, making 28 yards in two line 
bucks through left guard. The M. 
A. C. line was riddled by the Colby 
backs for substantial gains during 
the first quarter, but after that was 
able to hold its own. The center 
of the Aggie tine was unusually 
effective, most of the Colby gains 
being the result of skin tackle plays. 
Colby attempted but few end rune, 
all of which were unsuccessful. The 



1 

I 



I 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. ao, 19 14. 



line can be given credit for its stone- 
wall defense near its own goal. 
During the second quarter Aggie's 
line held Colbv without gaining an 
inch for two downs on its one-half 
yard line, also held them on the 10 
yard line, forcing them to attempt 
an unsuccessful forward pass. Very 
few fumbles were made, which was 
remarkable considering the condition 
of the field. Two Aggie fumbles 
were immediately recovered while 
Grayson fell on two of the 
four Colby fumbles. The penal- 
ties were few. Colby lost 10 yards 
from two offside penalties, while M. 
A. C. was unpenalized. 

The first quarter was all Colby, M. 
A. C. making but one first down this 
period. By straight football, mostly 
slashing tackle plays, with one for- 
ward pass for a gain of 25 yards, 
Colby brought the ball down the field 
to the M. A. C. five yard line. Two 
downs netted Colby four yards and 
the quarter ended. 

The second quarter saw a stone- 
wall defense from the Aggie Hue. 
Twice the Aggie lint' held, ouce on 
the one-quarter yard, once on the 
10 yard line and Palmer punted out 
of danger each time. The third time 
Colby, with six yards to go in four 
dowus pushed the ball over by inches 
on the fourth rush, quarterback 
Fraser carrying the ball through the 
line. 

The best offensive play of the 
Massachusetts team came in the 
third quarter. I'almer intercepted a 
Colby forward pass and rail it back 
80 yards to the Colby i. r > yard line. 
Two line bucks by Whorf netted 2. r » 
yards. Our only successful forward 
— Palmer to Plaisted— added 10 
yards more. Three line bucks netted 
four yards gain. An incomplete for- 
ward pass on the fourth down spoiled 
Massachusetts' chances of a touch- 
down, making it Colby's ball on her 
six yard line. Colby took the ball 
up the field on line plunges. 

During the last quarter the honors 
v*eie dis ided, neither team threaten- 
ing the other's goal. 

The play by quarters, in detail. : — 

MUST \>i MM IK 

M. A. C. won toss. Colby kicked 
to(Jrayson, who carried the ball 18 
yards to Aggie'slO yard line. First 
dowu — M. A. C. Palmer circled 
right end for 5 yards, Melicnn 1 yard 
through center. Darling i yards 
around left end. Palmer kicked to 
Colby on 1"> yard line. First down 
— Colby. Colby gained U yards 
through right tackle in two rushes, 8 
yards through left tackle and 3 yards 
through left guard for two first 
downs. Day nailed an end run for 
1 yard loss. Colby fullback made 8 
yards through right tackle but fum- 
bled on next play, Grayson recover- 
ing. First down — M . A. C. Palmer 
made » yards through left tackle, 
Whorf 1 yard through left guard and 
I'almer made first down. Darling 
made a nice gain through tackle for 



9 yards, but Palmer was nailed for a 
2 yard loss on an attempted end run. 
Darling made 2 yards through left 
tackle but Colby held on the fourth 
down. First down — Colby. Perry 
smeared an end run for a 2 yard loss, 
but tackle plays made first down. By 
smashing line plays, Colby made two 
more first downs, which, with a 25 
yard forward pass in our territory 
brought the ball to our 5 yard line. 
(Schlotterbeck replaced Danforth at 
right tackle. ) Two line plays netted 
Colby 4 yards. First quarter over. 
Colby 0, M. A. C. 0. 

SECOND QtTAOTB. 

Colby third down— 1 yard to go. 
Colby held for downs. First down 
— M. A. C. Palmer punted to 25 
yard line. First down Colby on 20 
yard line. Short gains through tack- 
le. Two unsuccessful forward passes, 
one going out of bounds. First 
down — M. A. C. on 6 yard line. 
Palmer punted to 86 yard line. First 
down — Colby on U0 yard line. Colby 
advanced ball to (5 yard line in two 
first downs by line plunges. First 
dowus by line plunges. First down 
— Colby. Jordan threw Cawley for 
1 yard loss, next play gained 7 yards 
through right tackle. (Crossman 
substituted for Hammerschlav. ) 
Fraser made 1 yard through the line 
for a touchdown. Colby failed to 
kick the goal. 

Colby kicked to If. A. C. Pal- 
mer failed to gain at left tackle. 

1 hiding made I yards. Colby ofTside 
5 yard penalty. First dowu M.A.C. 
Palmer failed to gain, fumble on sec- 
ond play, but recovered. First 
down M. A. C. Two line plunges 
netted 5 yards, a forward pass inter- 
cepted by Fraser. Colby first down 
on her 42 yard line. Line buck — no 
gain. Second quarter over. Score, 
Colby fi, M. A. C. 0. 

THIKI' QUARTER. 

Colby kicked to Grayson, who 
carried ball 15 yards to 40 yard line. 
First down M. A. C. Palmer 2 yards 
around left end. Melican, no gaiu. 
Darling, 3 yards then left tackle and 
an incomplete forward pass gave 
Colby the ball on her 45 yard line. 
Tackle plays made 10 yards in three 
rushes. Palmer intercepted forward 
pass running 30 yards. First down, 
M. A. C. on 15 yard line. Whorf 
made 18 yard on line buck, 12 yards 
more through the same play. Two 
Hue bucks for no gain, but a forward 
pass. Palmer to Plaisted netted 10 
yards and first dowu. First down 
M. A. C. goal to gain. Whorf made 

2 yards through center. Darling 
failed to gain, Whorf 2 yards more 
and an unsuccessful forward pass. 
First down Colby on her 6 yard line. 
Colbv rushed the ball to center of 
field on live plunges for four first 
downs, bringing ball to middle of 
field. Third quarter over. Score, 
Colby 6, M. A. C. 0. 

i •" i;i ii ...c \i:i i i.- 
Colby Ifst down. Grayson recov- 
ered a Colby fumble. First down 



M. A. C. Whorf and' Palmer gained 
6 yards through center. Colby first 
down. Grayson recovered a Colby 
fumble. First down M. A. C. 
Whorf and Palmer gained 6 yards 
through center. Colby offside, 5 
yard penalty. First down M. A. C. 
Darling made a yard around left end. 
Palmer 6 yards through right tackle. 
Whorf could not gain. Forward 
pass unsuccessful. First down Colby 
on her 35 yard line. Colby then 
made 3 first downs, featured by two 
12 yard forward passes. (Perry 
shifted to center, Fuller went in left 
guard, Grayson to left half back. 
Palmer to fullback, Higginbotham to 
right end. Palmer caught a forward 
on goal line, ruled a touchback. 
M. A. C. first down on 20 yard line. 
Forward pass incomplete. Game 
ended with ball on 25 yard line. 

The following football men made 
the Portland trip : Captain Melican, 
Whorf, Darling, Palmer, Grayson, 
Day, Plaisted, Schlotterbeck, Dan- 
forth, Perry, Jordan, Dole, Fuller, 
Curran, Higginbotham, Boles, Dunn, 
Murphy and Manager Price. 

The lineup : 



m. a. c. 

Day, le 

Planted, It 

Perry, Kuller, Ig 

Dole, Perry, C 

Jordan, rg 

Danforth, Schlotterbeek, rt 

( irayson, Higginbotham, re. 



COLBY, 

le, Crossman 

It, Dasey 

Ig, Deasy, Lescour 

c, Stanwood 

rg, Pendergast 

rt, I. add 

re, Royal 



Melican, qb qb, A. Fraser 

Darling, rhb, rhb, < .olden, B. Crossman 
I'almer, Grayson, Ihb 

Ihb, Hammerstang, R. Crossman 
Whorf, Palmer, fb fb, Cawley 

Score— Colby 6, M. A. Co. Touch- 
down — Frazer. Referee — A. S. Mac 
Readie, Portland Athletic club. Umpire 
—George Wilson. Bowdoin. Head lines- 
man—Edward Files, Bowdoin. Time- 
Two 12 and two io minute periods. 



the lecture on Animal 
or Market Gardening. 



Husbandry 
According 
to plans the members of each depart- 
ment will address their section at the 
meetings. There will also be lec- 
tures by prominent men from time to 
time. The plan is without doubt a 
wise one. Let us see a large number 
of the fellows out to make the meet- 
ings successful. 



FRESHMAN FOOTBALL 
The Freshman football team just 
managed to dodge its weekly white- 
wash brush Saturday when a field 
goal by Chambers gathered in three 
points, which looked lonesome when 
placed beside Holyoke High's 29. 
The Holyoke aggregation was fast 
and aggressive, which the freshmen 
were not. The Bcrimmage lines 
were about evenly matched as to 
weight, but the '18 backfield was 
considerably outweighed, which, 
coupled with the slow condition of 
the field, partially excuses the lower 
classmen. Most of Holyoke's gains, 
however, were made through the 
line. 

At the Btart the freshmen kicked 
off, and Holvoke hustled the ball 
down the field for a touchdown with- 
out further ado. Holyoke then 
kicked off and the freshmen returned 
the favor, putting the ball over the 
line on two occasions. Both touch- 
downs were disallowed on account of 



hotel Ularrcn 

South Deer field, Mass. 

X. d, AHERN, MANAGER 



STOCKBRIDGE CLUB 

An important business meeting of 
the Stock bridge Club was held Tues- 
day evening. After some discussion 
it was voted to change the time of 
meeting, as soon as the lectures by 
Professor Sprague are over, from 7 p. 
m. to 6 :30. Following out the plan 
previously decided upon, the members 
of the club were divided into four 
sections, those interested in Pomo- 
logy, Poultry, Animal Husbandry and 
Market Gardening. Each section 
immediately proceeded to elect a 
chairman, vice-chairman, secretary 
and treasurer and a program com- 
mittee. The results were as follow- 
ers : Pomology section, H. M. Bog- 
era, chairman, Warren, vice-chair- 
man, Baker, secretary and treasurer ; 
Poultry, Parmenter, chairman, Mid- 
dleton, vice-chairman. Topham, sec- 
retary and treasurer ; Animal Hus- 
bandry, Hollis, chairman, White, 
vice-chairman, Day, secretary and 
treasurer. Owing to the small num- 
ber present iu the Market Gardening 
section, the election of officers was 
deferred until the nest meeting. 

The program for these four sec- 
tions is to be carefully arranged so 
that only two of them will meet a 
week. Then the students in the 
Pomology course may also attend 



C FOB YOUR DEH A 

V Beautiful College Pennants w 
YALE and HARVARD, 

Each 9 in. x 34 in. 

PRINCETON, CORNELL, 
MICHIGAN, 

Each 7 in. x ai in. 

4 Pennants, Size 12 x 30-4 

Any Leading Colleges of 

Your Selection 

All of o*r best quality, in their 
proper colors, with colored emblems. 

Either assortment, for limited time, 
sent postpaid for 50 cents and five 
•tamps to cover shipping costs. 

Write us for prices before placing 
orders for felt novelties of all kinds. 

The Gem City Novelty Co., 
40s Bittner Street, 



Dayton, 



Ohio. 



FOR GOOD "EATS" 

OO to 

86 PLEASANT ST. 



Mrs, J. K. W. Davenport 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 201914. 



penalties. In this part of the game 
Chambers' forward passes, which 
were the redeeming feature of the 
M. A. C. men's game, worked excel- 
lently, Burtch getting away for Sh 
yards on one of them. On the last 
down Holyoke held, and Chambers 
dropped back for a 15 yard drop 
kick, making the score 7-3 for the 
first period. 

Holyoke made another touchdown 
in the second period, and put two 
more and a safety across in the last 
half on long, spectacular end runs 
by Walsh and tjuigley. The fresh- 
wen were unable to hold in these 
periods, with the exception of Foley, 
whose defensive work was of a high 
standard. The line up : 

M. A. C. 1918. 



HOLYOKE HIGH. 

McNault, 1 ■ 
Bryan, f ,e 

J. Sullivan, It 
Towers, lg 
Horrigan.c 
Moriarty, ) 
Dowling, \ rg 
Cunnitf, ) 
Dreicorh, rt 
Kane. J re 
Bryan, I 

E. Quigley.lhb 



re, 



Uurtch 
W. Sawyer 



( Miner 
rt, Holmes 
rg, Robert* 
c, Tdton 
1 Carter 
lg, j Kaymond 
( Sullivan 
It, Capen 
McKee 



]e '\ FatM 



rhb 



(•rayson 
lawyrr 



Jurj 
Sa^ 
Bainbridge 

fb.Hawley 

Ihb, Foley 

qb, Chambers 



KitZRerald.1 Jb 
Swords, I 
Walsh, rhb 
W.Quigley.) b 
Cordon, I n 

Score — Holyoke High 29. M. A. C. 3. 
Touchdowns— Walsh 1, W. Qu-gley * 
Coals from touchdowns— Walsh 3. 
Coals from the fields— Chambers. Hol- 
voke scored two points on a safely. 
Keferee— Campbell of Springfield Y. M. 
C A. college. Umpire— Bart Shea. 
Linesman-Edgeworth. Time— Four 
10 minute periods. 



LEWIS CLUB FORMED 
A long yell for Lewis 1 At a mass 
meeting held immediately after 
Wednesday's assembly, an organiza- 
tion known as the "Non-Partisan 
Lewis club" was formed, the purpose 
of which is to lead the student body 
in an earnest effort to "get behind 
Dean Lewis and boost him" as a can- 
didate for Congressman. 

K. C. Towne, president of the sen 
ate, said that Dean Lewis is one of 
the great leaders, and deserves the 
support of the students. He then 
called upon Professor Sprague for a 
few words, in which he said that 
"we'll be blessed if we won't elect 
him, and blessed if we'll send him 
away from M. A. C. However, 
since he has chosen to run for con- 
gressman, we had better do what we 
can to push him. There is a possi- 
bility of great influence going out 
from a live club here ; the only thing 
to do is to stick together, and the 
work can be carried through." 

Captain Martin then declared that 
"when it's for Lewis there are no 
party lines, we're all for him." The 
formal organization of the club fol- 
lowed, Williams »16 was elected 
president unanimously, while Mas 
In was made vice-president and" 
ican '15 secretary and treasurer, 
the same manner. 



LANDSCAPE ART CLUB 
The Landscape Art Club, recently 
reorganized and enlarged in scope, is 
now planning for another successful 
year, and needs ouly the strong back- 
ing of every man interested in Land- 
scape to make it one of the most 
helpful of all the student organiza- 
tions. At the first meeting of the 
year, the Club elected the following 
officers: president, Earle S. Draper; 
vice-president, Harold D. Grant; 
secretary, Malcolm N. Goodwin; 
treasurer, Andrew Dalrymple. These 
officers are to form the entertainment 
committee. 

The committee plans this year to 
make the meetings more social in 
character so that the students will 
fiud them more enjoyable and inter- 
esting. Monthly tramps into the near- 
by country, followed by bungalow 
suppers, will be a feature of thiB 
year's program. The first hike of 
this kind was held last Tuesday af- 
ternoon when the Senior landscape 
class went out to the Pelham hills 
accompanied by Prof. Waugh. All 
enjoyed supper at the bungalow there 
and listened to Prof. Waugh's inter- 
esting account of his trip to Germany. 
From now on regular meetings will 
be held every other Tuesday evening, 
and will be addressed by speakers 
prominent in the profession of land- 
scape gardening and in the allied 
arts. All students interested in land- 
scape art are invited and urged to 
attend and will be sure of hearing 
something worth while from men who 
are well fitted for their calling. 
Every man, freshman to senior, who 
expects ever to go into landscape 
work should do all in his power to 
make this club successful, both so- 
cially and from an educational stand- 
point. 



DR. R. C. 

Dentist 

NASH'S BLOCK 

KveniuRS by Appointment. 



LABROVITZ 

Tailor and PUSSSBR. 

Ctnts' Furnishings - Dress Suits to 

Rent— Drill aiovea and Collars 

Tit KIT SSSTBM, 

11 Ainii.v.Ki. i»*mt»»»e 



High Grade Furnishings 

Travel the country over and you'll not 
find a choicer or a better line of Men's 
Toggery than you'll find right here. 

The best shirt makers, underwear 
makers, scarf makers and glove 
makers send us these productions. 

The Best in Every Line 
is Here. 

Then again, we are not high priced. 
All the patrons of this store know 
this to be a fact. Test us and see. 

See our new Manhattan and Monarch 
Shirts. $1.50 to $2.50. 

Look at our Gloves, $1.00 to $2.50. 

See our Neckwear, 25c to $1.50. 

le'v B. K. Co.; 1914 

Two Hundred MacKinaws Now Ready for Your Inspection. 




SANDERSON & THOMPSON 

Amltorat 



CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 
Some seventy men were present 
at the Christian Association meeting 
last Thursday night to hear Mr. <>tte 
of Amherst college speak on the 
Student Volunteer Movement. 

The movement started at Mt. Her- 
man. Later two unions were formed s 
one with its center at Amherst, and in- 
cluding Amherst, Mt, Herman, North- 
field Seminary and Smith ; the other 
with its center at Yale. About a 
year ago these two unions became a 
large united organization, including 
all colleges in the valley. This union 
is to hold a great convention at Smith 
college on Oct. SI and Nov. 1. All 
of the above are to be represented, 
and although it is the day of the 
Tufts game, it is certainly urgent 
that at le»<T a few Massachusetts 
the pleasure of accom- 
team In order to repre- 
this great gathering of 



! 

Twenty-five cents will be put in a box for tbe 
NEW ATHLETIC FIELD every time you 
buy shoes at our store costing $3.50 or over. 

VF.RY LATEST STYLE*. 

Shoes for the Drill-$2,50 to $5.00 

F*««e'« Shoe Store 



ScDool and College Photographers ♦ . . 





/ r>CAL-L-Y' s» Center St., Northampton, Mass., 
L.W*,Mi-i-r. Md South Hadley MaMt 



Main Office: 

1546-1548 Broadway, 

New York City 



These Studios offer the best skilled 
artists and most complete 

equipment obtainable 



It was vote4, u/ announce the birth of a daughter, 
ooncluson, that the senate *ct a/a 



board of directors In the Lewis tftub. 



Mr. and Mra. Paul K. Alger 
laugh 
Aug. 



Parion Kirkland Alger, 
weight nine ponnds. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



-DEALER* IN- 



Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 






1 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct 20, 1914- 



THE MASSACHUSETTS C0LLE6IAN 



Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 

Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF BDIVORS. 

FRANK W. BUELL »i«, Editor-in-Chief 

TYLER S. ROGERS '16, Managing Editor 

HENRY H. WHITENS. Assistant Editor 

JAMES A. PRICE '15, Athletic Editor 

E. SUMNER DRAPER '15, Athletic Editor 
THOS.L. HARROCKS'i6, Department Editor 

ALFRED A. GIOIOSA'i6, Campus Editor 

FRANK A. SCHEUFELE, Alumni Editor 



MILFORD R. LAWRENCE 
RICHARD W. SMITH '17, 



Associate Editor 
Associate Editor 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

MAURICE J. CLOUGH '15, Business Manager 
CHAS A. HUNTINGTON, JR. '16, 

Assistant Business Manager 
W. RICHARD SEARS '15, Advertising Man'g'r 
LESTER E. FIELDlNG'i6, Ass't Adv. Mgr. 
BIRGER R. ROSEQUIST'17. Circulation 

Subscription I1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable 
to Maurice J. Clouch. 

Entered as seoond-ckaa matter at the Amherst 
Pes* Office. 



Vol. XXV. Tuesday, Oct. 20. No. 6 



Would it not be well that the stu- 
dent body give a more considerate 
regard to the assembly and chapel 
speakers? This is a matter often 
brought to the notice of all who think 
or care for such things. The fresh- 
man in the rear of the room, new to 
the freedom of college life and placed 
where it is difficult to hear, soon for- 
gets he is expected to be a man. 
The sophomore, in the exuberance of 
a new freedom among the men of the 
college, often thinks that respect is 
due to him alone. The junior, 
neglecting responsibility, peacefully 
sleeps as he sprawls on his chair. 
The seniors usually keep a semblance 
of attention for their own self 
respect. 

Our assembly speakers are bright, 
live men with something to say that 
is worth the hearing. Also the repu- 
tation of the college is at stake. 
Every one of these men goes out of 
here carrying an impression of the 
men of the institution. If we treat 
them with respect our gentlemanliness 
and worth rise in their minds. But on 
the other hand if we are lax in our 
attention their opinion of our worth 

decreases. 

It is not only good breeding but 
good advertising to show the essen- 
tials of respect to our visitors. 

This matter has been spoken of 
before, not only in the editorial col- 
umns of this paper, but from the 
platform in chapel as well. Of 
course, we realize that it is quite the 
proper thing to btag about sleeping 
through chapel exercises when at 
home or elsewhere where fond audi- 
ences hang on our every word. With 
this in mind we realize that it is dif- 
ficult to make any impression along 
this line. Hope is synonymous with 
life however and we are therefore 
again suggesting to the student body 
that conduct in chapel befitting col- 
lege men would l»e a good innovation 
at this college. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

[Notices for this column should be dropped in 
the Collegian Office or handed to Alfred A' 
Gioiosa' 16, on or before the Saturday preceding 
each issue. 1 

Oct. 21—1-10 p. m., Assembly, Mr. 

Edwin D. Mead. The 

World Peace Foundation, 

Boston. 
Oct. 22— rt-30 p. m., Landscape Art 

Club, at Wilder Hall. 
7-45 p. m., M. A. C. C. A. 

in chapel. 
Oct. J4— Football. Freshmen vs. 

Conn. Literary Institute, 

at Suffield, Conn. 
Oct. 27—7-00 p. m., Room G South 
college Stockbridge Club. 

7-00 p. m., Junior class siug 

in chapel. 
Oct. 28—1-10 p. m., Assembly, Dr. 

Henry Wallace, Editor 

Wallace's Farmer, Des 

Moines, Iowa. 



JUDGING TEAM 

Lkavks kor Dairyman'" Show in 

Chicago. 

On Wednesday the Stock Judging 
team, consisting of Harvey, Whit- 
more and Moberg, will leave for Chi- 
cago to compete at the National 
Dairyman's show. This competition 
is open to all land grant colleges and 
secondary schools of agriculture in 
the country that offer a regular course 
of two or more years in dairying or 
animal husbandry. It is well sup- 
ported by the strong middle western 
colleges. There are offered in addi- 
tion to several individual cups $1600 
in prizes. 

The team that will compete is the 
same that took such a successful part 
in the Biockton contest, finishing 
fully 300 points ahead of the nearest 
New England college. If this is to 
serve as a criterion M. A. C. has an 
excellent opportunity to come home 
with honors over the colleges of the 
Middle West. All members of the 
team are eligible under the following 
rule to take part in the work : 

"Any member of an agricultural 
college or of a secondary school 
under the direct supervision of a land 
grant college, who is regularly 
matriculated in a course of at least 
two years in agriculture or dairying 
and has taken not less than 1 2 weeks 
undergraduate work in the calendar 
year in which the show is held, who 
has never taken part in any dairy 
judging contest of a national or an in- 
ternational character, who has never 
acted as an official judge of cattle 
at a fair or show, who has at no 
time served as a teacher of animal 
husbandry or dairying in a college or 
secondary school as mentioned above, 
may enter. The judging committee 
shall consist of one man from each 
institution having a team in the 
contest." 

The prizes are in scholarship 
form and are to he used for graduate 
work iu dairying er animal has* 
bandry. Any of the better agricul- 
tural schools may be selected with 



AGGIE ME2T 

Require Good Stationery 

Inquire of anyone where to obtain it, and 

Acquire what you need when you correspond— that is 
A Quire of the "Adams' Special 45c a quire " 

Paper that sells elsewhere for 60 cents and more 



GET IT AT 



ADAMS', The REXALL Store 



UNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

It Mil I VK SUNDAY SERVICE AT 7 1> M. 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 



MODERN REPAIR DEPT. 



E. RUSSELL NORTON E.M.BOLLES 



SALES AGENT 



Davenport Miller 
Vein Coal 

Best Quality Pennsylvania Coal 



BOSTON OFFICE 

85 Water St. 



NEW YORK OFFICE 

1 Broadway 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

CURRAN & DYER, Props. 

Loose* Leaf Note Books and Fountain 
— Pens— 



THE SHOEMAM 



E. E. MILLETT 

JEWELER and OPTOMETRIST 

lenses ground while you wait 

College Jewblky 
Violin, Banjo. Mandolin and Guitar Strings 

v m 111 i;-i MASS. 
Nest to Post Office. 



Amherst 



CO - OP LAUNDRY 

High-Grade College Work 



Shirts, 
Collars, 
Cuffs, - 
Plain wash, 
Same, rough dry, 



10-150 

2 I-2C 
2 I-2C 

48c per doz. 
30c per doz. 



DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, J1.50 a Suit 

K.T. FRosT.Agent; D. Shekinyan, A«*t Agent 
Try our ticket system 

Put full name and address on laundry 



Come to us for- 



Fireplace Goods, Coat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and. Shoe Brushes 



Anything 




ware and Cooking Utensils 

d to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PL 




& HEATING CO. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 20, 1914. 



The Hoiyoke Valve £ Hydrant Co. 

lobbersof Wrought Iron and Brass Pipe, Valves 
t nd Fittings (or Steam, Water and Gas, Asbestos 
and Magnesia Boiler and Pipe Coverings, Pipe 
Cut to Sketch, Mill Supplies, Engineers and 
Contractors for Steam and Hot Water Heating, 
\utomatic Sprinkler Systems, Boiler and Engine 
Connections. - - Hoiyoke, Mim. 



i**-»**-i-vf« 1 for 



BECKMAN 



"Hamp 



LOW PRICE TMLORING CO. 

SUIIS MADE TO ORDER 
Suits Chined. Pressed and Dved Allkindsof 
Repairing lor Ladies and Gentlemen neatly done. 
High-grade work by first class tailor. Work 
called fur and delivered. Sell tickets for pressing. 
4 suits 1 <>k $1.50 

GEORGE KOrOWITI, PROP. 

Main Street, Amherst. Mass. Nash Block 
On your way to the Post Office, lei. 43* W 



FLEMING'S SHOE STORE 



Northampton 



For particular people 

THE ELMS RESTAURANT 

213 Main St., Northampton 

(Near \mher«>i atf line! 



ft Quality Restaurant at Moderate 
Prices. 

TRY OUR SPECIALS 

And a la carte service. 

OYSTERS STEAKS CHOPS 
FRIED CHICKEN, ETC. 

Open 6 a. m. to 11 p. m. 



the advice of the instructors for 
this work. A wide range is thus 
given and a man has the opportunity 
of working under as good men as 
there are in the country. They are 
divided as follows : 
§400 highest individual score judging 
Jersev cattle. 

ty 

$400 highest individual score judging 

Holstein cattle. 
$400 highest general individual score, 
$400 highest team score. 

The contest is heartily supported 
in all the middle western colleges 
such as Nebraska, Missouri, Illinois, 
Wisconsin, etc. All these colleges 
have very strong dairy and husbandry 
courses so that the rivalry at once be- 
comes strong and the competition 
keen While Nebraska has always 
been a factor to be reckoned with, the 
eastern colleges are not without credit, 
for Cornell always sends a good team 
and last year the second highest in- 
dividual score went to Delaware. 
The first year that our team com- 
peted there were fourteen teams 
entered. Last year Maine and New 
Hampshire sent teams and will do 
the same this year if they can secure 
enough money to defray the expenses. 
Our own fund of $160 that runs 
for two more yearn makes possible 
our participation. This however 
covers the carfares of the members 
on the trip but the rest of their ex- 
penses must be borne by the individ- 
ual members, unless raised by sub- 
scription in the student bulls. The 
first time we sent h team, each man 
paid all the expense except the car- 
fare; since then, the men around 
college have helped. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 

Mr. Campion has just returned from England with the 

AQUASCUTUM 

OVERCOATS 

Wells-Margetson Neckwear, Caps & Knitted Vests 

On account of war it will not be possible to get any more ol 
these goods, so an early inspection will be to your advantage. 




Fine Tailoring 



Men's Furnishings 



-See Our Agents- 



Hubbard's BasE Fertilizers 



the most economical you can use. 

BetteR crops 

are the inevitable result. 




*£ftTILlZ**^ 



THE ROGERS fc HUBBARD COMPANY, Middletown, Conn. 

uiliri' mihI Work), l*»H I l. Conn. 



-I 



FLOWERS AND PUNTS 

drown by the riork ult ural Dept. 

We offer our surplus stock of cut 
flowers and plants at reasonable rates 
to students and faculty. This stock 
is grown in modern houses under 
ideal conditions. Roses, carnations, 
violets, chrysanthemums and sweet 
peas in season. 

OROWN ON THE CAMPUS 

Telophoao SOO 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Everything in Photography 

Including Framing. 

Oood work speaks for Itself. 

\ash Block, Amherst, Mass, 



FLORISTS AND GARDENERS 

The Florist's and (Jnrdenei '» Club 
luiH taken a i»e*> Kant- of life. Ala 
reeent meeting the <bib was thor- 
oughly reorganized hugely through 
the efforts of Mr. Thurston, assist- 
ant in floriculture. The following 
officers were elected : President, 
Doran *1.'»; vice-president, Hatha- 
way 'Hi; secretary and treasurer, 
Miss Hurt *lf>. The arrangement of 
programs ia in the hands of a com- 
mittee composed of Hathaway ud 
Wright '15. 

The club in its work hopes to 
reach all the men in college inter- 
ested in floriculture, particularly 
those majoring in that subject and 
landscape gardening. The club ex- 
pects to have from time to time men 
of good practical experience to 
address it. At other times the dis- 
cussions will be by the members, as 
the club realizes the value of the 
individual work for each member. 
The meetings will be held once every 
two weeks. The next meeting will 
l»e Wednesday evening, Oct. 21, in 
French Hall. Two of the members, 
Little *16 and Doran 'IS, will talk on 
their summer's experience in green- 
house work. The future plans of 
the club will also be diacussed. All 
are invited and will be cordially 
welcomed. 



n • fj 1 are supplied every year 

Burpee s deeds i ie v ™«^™™ 

*^**» |#**^» v www^v cia planters than are 
the seeds of any other growers. Do you know Burpee- 
Quality "Seeds that Grow" ? If not, we would like to 
make your acquaintance. Simply send us your address 
(a postal card will do) and you will receive Burpee's 
Annual for 1914,— a bright new book of 182 pages, which 
is recognized as "The Leading American Seed Catalog." 
Kindly write to-day! Address 

W. ATLEE BURPEE & CO., BarpesBtikUiigs^hiladelplum 




F. A. S 

MEN'S STORE 



USE OUR NEW CASH DISCOUNT CARD 
AND SAVE FIVE PER CENT ON 

SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING 



and Custom 



C*rp?rvlsr St Morehoust, 
PRIHTERSi 



No. i, Cool Place, 



Amherst, Mass. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 20, 1914. 



CAMPUS NOTES 
Homer W. Nims of Montague has 
pledged Theta Chi. 

Sidney M. Masse 'IS of Dorches- 
ter has pledged Sigma Phi Kpsilon. 

Oct. 24, 3 p. m.. Football— M. A. 
(!. varsity 2nd vs. Springfield Y. M. 
C. A. 2nd on campus. 

At a meeting of the Junior Prom 
committee last Wednesday Frank 
Scheufele was elected chairman and 
Charles Hathaway treasurer. The 
exact date for the Prom has not as 
yet been decided upon. 

The annual Inter-class Cross Coun- 
try run scheduled to take place on 
Saturday the seventeenth has been 
postponed until Tuesday. Two days 
of continued ruin made the course so 
soggy and slippery that it would have 
been impossible to form an estimute 
of the true ability of the men and their 
value as varsity cross country 
material. 

Mr. Kdwin 1). Mead of the World 
Peace Foundation will give two lect- 
ures at the Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural college Wednesday, Oct. 21. 
The first of these will be at the 
Assembly at 1-1<>, and the seeoud 
will be given at 7-80 P. ■. This 
lecture will be given in the chapel and 
the public is cordially invited to 
attend. These lectures will be in the 
series of talks on World Polities, in 
which subject a permanent lecture- 
ship was established last wiuter by 
the Massachusetts Agricultural col- 
lege. 



INFORMAL 

[Continued from page i] 



1918— H. E. Jones, R. W. Har- 
wood, McK. Lieper, J.N. Preble, R. 
W. Weeks, L. M. Van Alstyne, li. 
W. Thorpe. 

Others who attended were : 1). 
Davidson and Aloe. 

It is hoped that the former enthus- 
iasm will be showu at the next in- 
formal, which should have a record 
breaking attendance as it falls on 
Nov. 7, the day scheduled for the 
Middlebury football game. 

In 1908 the Informals were first 
run by the student body ; previous 
to that time Individual* inside or 
persons outside of the college had 
financed the social dances. Since 
then the informals have grown in 
favor and now occupy a dis- 
tinctive position in the democratic 
social life of the college. 



ASSEMBLY 

[Continued from page i] 



FRATERNITY CONFtRENCE 
At a regular meeting of the Fra- 
ternity conference several matters of 
importance were taken up. It was 
voted that the three men, about 
whom considerable discussion was 
waged in regard to their pledging, 
should have their pledges withdrawn 
and not be considered as pledged 
until the Spring pledging day when 
they must again make their decision 
as to what fraternity they will join. 
A committee was appointed to 
readjust the rushing rules for next 
tall and to make as complete and as 
comprehensive a set as possible. 
Other matters of lesser importance 
weie also discussed. 



THE 

Hoover & Smith Go. 

616 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 

Diamond Merchants 

Philadelphia's Official Fraternity Jeweler 

SPECIALISTS IN 

Fraternity Badges, Fobs, Noveltiee, 

Rings, Charms Prises Trophies. 

Medals College Pins, Fobs. Seals' 

Rings. Charms.-. 



"SCOTTIE" 
H. HOOPER 

Will clean and press your clothes so you 

will be satisfied. It costs no more 

and he is nearer to "Aggie." 

I.IBRHAL TICKKT SYSTEM 

Under Columbia Cafe 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Now 4t 1? Pleasant M. 
OculUt".' Htescrlirtlims filled. Itroken lenses 
Accuralel] KepUced. I me Watch Kepamnu 
Promptly anrl > kin a II) !><>ne. 

Satisfaction (Juaianteed 

E. B. DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

DENTAL Rooms 

Williams Block, Amh.-rst. Mass. 

Office Hours »1frl»A. M., 1.10 t<» 5 »"- M' 



one line of ideals, but soon finds 
himself favorable to another, because 
he thinks the second is higher than 
the first. One of us may be a ser- 
geant in the army of workers, while 
another one is a general, but we are 
all serving the same purpose in the 
end; namely, that of improving 
ideals and making a better life. 

'•It is not true that everything bad 
is contagious and nothing good is. 
Many persons seem to have that idea, 
but it is not so. On the contrary, 
the good is much more contagious 
than the bad. This is the foundation 
for the fact that we may be affected 
by the leadership of others. Battles 
are won in just this way. The lead- 
er who amounts to anything is the 
one who has a good personality to 
put into other men. 

"The main lesson we must learn in 
our leadership is that there is one 
root of all greatness — faith. Faith 
is seeing a promise afar off. If \<>u 
are to be leaders you must expect to 
die before reaching the goal of your 
ideals. Consequently, you must 
have faith. Learn to change the 
drudgery of life into joy by finding 
that enjoyment can come in work. 
You must get it by contagion. 
Therefore, always be on the lookout 
for the noble life. Remember a liv- 
ing hero is belter than a dead one. 
and have your heroes true to life. 
It is your liusiness to (ind out heroes 
who are about you evei vwlieie, and 
get infected by them. Above all 
things, don't let anyone persuade 
you that you are expecting too much 
of life ; you cannot possibly expect 
Uto much. The common fault is 
that young men do not expect 
enough— they lack confidence. Go 
out knowing you must stiuggle in 
this world, even though it may look 
black and bad in spots. Think that 
lit o is the greatest thing in the world. 
If von Jtave these ideals, you need 
not worry about leadership." 



remains that you can find the same 
in the Index. 

As for you Sophomores, who set 
yourselves up as masters of the 
Freshmen, what do you know about 
having your class picture in the Index, 
of Beeing a blank space where another 
aught to be? Statistics will be pub- 
lished shortly showing the number of 
books bought by each class. Do you 
want to be first in this, as you are in 
many things? Dig deep. 

Juniors are the "pieces de resis- 
tance" in every annual and this one 
is no exception to the rule. Not only 
will you see your maps but you will 
also have a chance to see what the 
board knows about you. For in- 
stance, who does the following quota- 
tion fit, "As fair as soft, as soft as 
sweet, as sweet as beautiful." Kvery 
Junior ought to need at least two, 
many have ordered three. 

Seniors, men of beardB and canes 
and liesure moments, will surely de- 
sire a memento of their last year in 
college. A library of iWexej is as 
necessary to the graduate of M. A. 
C. as is a degree. Doc Mooney will 
be on your trail in the near future, 
so save your dimes for one of the 
pretty little tickets that will entitle 
you to an Imlex. 

Graduates will find in the fn&et 
much that will prove interesting ns 
well as instructive. If you know of 
some high school boy that you would 
like to have enter college, one of 
the best inducements that we know- 
is a good IikIij:. 

Keep your eyes on the CotLMlaM 
if you desire the latest news concern- 
ing the annual that will make tlu-m 
all sit up and take notice. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. ao» 1914. 



7 



STEAM PITTING. Telephone *>-K 

GAS PITTING, TINNING. 

F. W. DANCE & CO., Plumbers 

Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, MEMORIAL 
Windows, Lead Lu.hts. &c. 

ft Clifton Ave.. AMHFKST. MASS. 



THB -riCIstI»«s\Y l»AS*l\.<>I* 

<'|e»n»lBB l»r»a*ln»j K.|»i»lrln» 
(JulckrM •wrrlw, H*<»t Work. Lowwt Hrhf 
All wotk carefully done. Work called for ind 
delivered. Gent*' overcoats, suits, pants and 
coats. Ladies' fine linen su*ts a specialty. 
Teams will call every day at M. A.C. 

WW. rB.t»RMS, Prop. 
Rear Nwh Bl»k. Amherst. Tel. No, U*t 



Now is the time to be planning for 

FraternityGroups 

Have them taken at 

MISS McCLELLAlTS STUDIO 

44 State Strr-t, • - Northampton, Mas.. 



1016 INDEX 

If during the next two or three 
days, a member of the I»d<\r 
board intercept you to buy one 
of the tickets for this year's book, 
do not retreat in fear. The price of 
these tickets is only a dollar and the 
balance of the price of the book 
need not be paid until the book is de- 
livered. And the book : well it con- 
tains things that arc so absolutely 
new in the Index line that even the 
most blast' reader of the college an- 
nuals will And something absolutely 
new to interest him. 

Freshmen, are you aware of the 
nature of the class history that is to 
appear ? Do you know that it is con- 
sidered one of the most original 
along that line In the last few years? 
Do you know the recorde of the 
teams during the past year? No, of 
course you don't and it isn't to be 
expected that you should, but the fact 



certed action were taken by the stu- 
dent body to make use of the time 
after dinner until the return of the 
special train. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

The M. A. C. reunion at Coney 
Island recently brought Myron 
I la. '.en '10, George Zabriskie '13, 
Harold J. Morse '14 and Carl M. 
Allen '14 together for a lively 
evening. 

'05. — Albert D. Taylor has recent- 
ly been appointed consulting land- 
scape architect for the Detroit city 
planing and improvement commission. 
He has also been selected as advising 
landscape architect in the develop- 
ment of the Ohio State Normal 
school at Kent, Ohio. 

•Ofi. — John F. Lyman. Summer 
address, 14'> Brighton Road, Clinton- 



A SUGGESTION 

Ratter early perhaps but why not 
plan now for what you are going to 
do when you hit the big town of Bos- 
ton for that Tufts' game? We have 
an idea as to what you might do. 
Other colleges have a certain plan of 
action after a big game as the Tuft's 
game is to us. The easiest plan to 
figure out is to select some one 
theatre and have as many of the fel- 
lows that care to take in a show pick 
on that one, and if there are fifty 
men that decide to go to the same 
show it will make quite a gathering. 

We are not connoisseurs in the 
matter of the theatre, especially in 
Boston— the hub of the Western 
hemisphere, wc believe — but in order 
to have a basis on which to plan we 
will select -'The Road to Happi- 
ness," playing at the Wilbur theatre. 

This play is one of the best that is 
at present playing in Boston * Wil- 
liam Hodge — the man that made 
"The Man from Home" famous — is 
the leading man and be is playing 
to form this year as heretofore. 

The play is a light comedy ami 
shonld be of use in counter-acting 
the strain of the game that comes in 
the afternoon. This is merely given 
as a suggestion but it would not be 
at all oat of the way if some con 



OVER 66 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 




Trade Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights Ac. 
Anyona tending a sket eh and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinum free wbetuer an 
invention la probably patentable. Commtinlca- 
tionaatrlctlyconndentlal. HAN0B00K on Patents 
»ent free. OI<le« apeiicy for aecunug patents. 

Patents taken throuirh Munn a, Co. receive 
tp f <■ iol notlu, without charge, In the 

Scientific American. 

A handaomelf lllnstrsted weekly. I. atwest cir- 
culation of any srienlUlc journal. T enus. S3 a 
ji'-ir: lour nionlba, SL Sold by all newRdealera, 

3o.364 Broadw.,. (jew York 

1 Offlce, «K r BU Washington. D. C 

Batehelder & Snyder Co. 

r \( K I 1- 1 "I 1 1 HI UKfcMSKKH 
AND I'.IIIKK MAKKBS. 



-WHOLESALE HEALERS IN- 



I Beef, Mutton, Lamb, Veal, Perk, Lard. Hams. 

Bacon, Sausage*. Poultry, Uame, Butter 

Cheese, Eggs, Beans. 

litre* Store* ;j,;557.«. » & 6; Blackston.- Bt 

n iston. Packing House. Brighton, Mass. 

Vitwe Poultry Dressing Plant, Boston. 

Creameries in Vermont. 



01 LAVAL 

Cream Separators 

Make Fall and Winter 
Dairying More Profitable 

TH K K K are special advantages in using a 
good cream separator during the fall 
and winter months. 
The milk from cows long In lactation is 
hardest to cream— and likewise hardest to 
separate with an inferior separator. 

Moreover, cream and butter prices are 
highest, so that the waste of gravity setting 
or a poor separator ec tints for most. 

Then there's the sweet, warm skin -milk for 
stock feeding, alone worth the cost of a sepa- 
rator in cold weather. 

There is surely no reason to delay the pur- 
chase of a separator or to continue the use ol 
an inferior one. 

Von can't afford to 
watt until next spring, 
I .et the De Laval start 
saving cream for you 
right new and it will 
earn its cost by spring. 
See the nearest 
De Laval agent at 
once, or If yon do 
not know him, write 
us direct for any de- 
sired information. 

THE DE UVAL SEPARATOR CO. 




* * Broadway 
hew ye*K 



wF. Madison St, 

'HI' AH" 



ville, Ohio. During the college year 
he is located at the Ohio Htate Uni- 
versity at Columbus, Ohio, as pro- 
fessor of agricultural chemistry. 
Mr. Lyman was promoted to full 
professorship during the past year. 
He has just erected a house in 
ColumbQs. 

'05.— G. Howard Allen, Phi Sigma 
Kappa house, 2830 College Ave., 
Berkeley, California. Associated 
with the Department of Agricultural 
Kxtension at the University of 
California. 

'10.— Married at Billerica, Oct. 7, 
Josiah C. Folsom and Miss Flora 
Annie Beers. Rowland T. Beers 
1912, a brother of the bride, was 
best man. After a short trip Mr. 
and Mrs. Folsom will return to Bil- 
lerica aud be at home after Dec. 1. 

•10. —Fred P. Nickless, for two and 
one-half years witb the Philippine 
Islands bureau of agriculture, has 
returned home, lie and some friends 
had taken passage for New Yolk via 
Kurope, intending to travel on the 
continent, but the outbreak of the 
Kuropeau war forced the party to 
return across the Pucilic, and tbat 
only after great delay in securing 
accommodations. He will remain at 
home for the present. Address, 
Billerica, R. F. D. 

'fl.—H. W. Blaney was awarded 
the professional degree of Mastei in 
Landscape Architecture at Harvard 
University last June, after one year's 
study there, and is now Assistant in 
Landscape Kxtension at the Univer- 
sity of Illinois, Irbana, 111. 

Ml. — C. A. Smith, address Jeffer- 
son Medical college. Walnut St., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Ml.— Wakje up, classmates, aud 
send in some 191 1 news to the Col- 
legian, and your contribution to the 
athletic field fund. Make 1!»11 as 
good as the rest. 

•12.— Kd wiu B. Young, Box VJ4, 
Hinsdale, N. H. Principal Hins- 
dale high school. 

'1*2.— Ralpli K. Parker has been 
studying the My problem in Montana 
during the past summer and has just 
returned to coutiuue his graduate 
work. He reports a fine time ami 
lots of flies. He has recently writ- 
ten a monograph upon "Sarcophagi- 
dae of New Kngland." 

*14.— C. C. Hill is connected with 
the U. S. Bureau of Entomology, 
with headquarters at Nashville, Tenn. 

'II. — Carl M. Allen is with the In- 
secticide Department of the General 
Chemical company. His jiersonal 
address is 224 State street, Flushing, 
N. Y 

*14.-— Leon Edgar Smith is with 
the Bowker Insecticide company, 48 
Chatham street, Boston. 

»14.— Harold J. Morse is working 
with the Coe- Mortimer Co. In New 
York city. 

"14.— Harry D Brown, Billerica. 
With C. A. Backer and Co., florist*. 




Che Pheasant 

Hmttv St., Smberat 

Breakfast, Luncheon, 
Afternoon Tea. 

Dinner if arranged for. 

Telephone 470 

Rooms for Transients. 

theTeaghers Exchange 

Of Btston i» Bullion St. 

Recommends Teachers, Tutors and Schools 



An especially Oood Commission Proposltlon- 

Cash for test orders- Article widely Advertised— 
Cuts down expense in powfi i latits- AddirSN 
Engineering Sui-i-ia Co., ijjS N. <»tli Mm* 
Philadelphia, Pa. ^^_______ 



* They're not »hort-liwd 

The Jerseys 

In 1913 eighteen Jersey 
cow» were olliciaily tested 
which avcragid 12 rears 
aid 7 months ol ape. Their 
a/crace milk production 
wasB< 7 pounds. Average 
tutter 1 t. 3E7 pounds. One 
ol tii. .' cows was over 18 
years old. 
Longevity. Con*tiln*ton c"f Economic 
Production aie H'fs.y t.iai j>. wtisnv i. 

in uieskiin juscy am r club 

* !2« W. tii St., N^w Yiirk ( Ity 




lIlWiOTfli*^^^ PEN 

VI I I lj>*^Minimize your fountain pen 
I V ^^^^ troubles by owning a Moore's. C. It Is the 
0/ ^^TnsJeat. soundest and morn dependable pen known. 
^ m Its strength Ilea In Its very simplicity. Nothing 
flnikytogetoutof order. C You can give your- 
self no better treat than a Moore's Non-leakable. j. 
For Sale by Dealers Everywhere) ^ 

American Fountain Pen Company 

Adams, Cuahlna ft Foster, Selling Agents 
168 DEVONSHIRE STREET :: n BOSTON, MASS. 



milNTilN DP.N UP 



■S) 



: 



E. Frank Coe Fertilizers 

1QC7 THE BUSINESS FARMERS' STANDARD 1Q14 
1057 FOR OVER FIFTY-FIVE YEARS iJlH 




Do You Raise 300 Bushels of Potatoes per Acre? 

(HREE hundred bushels per acre is 
not an unusual yield by any means, 
but did you get it this year ? 
•SIf you were planning to raise 300 
bushels of potatoes to the acre how 
- far apart would you space your rows? 

How far apart would you drop the seed pieces in 

the row? 

flHow much fertilizer would you use to grow 300 

bushels of potatoes per acre? How would you 

apply it ? 

IJAre you sure that your seed potatoes are true to 

name and true to type ? 

qWhat are you doing to prevent "scab,'* and early 

and late blight ? 

«IDid you have a short crop of potatoes because of 

dry weather? Have you decided how you will 
^ overcome this trouble in the future ? 

f All these practical point*, and aaay more, are fully covered ein our 
new book 

"Potatoes: A Money Crop" 

which will he scat Ire* to every potato grower who requests . copy, and 

mentions this paper. 

•This book is written by a man who himself has had years of ea^rieaec as 
a potato grower, and who baa made a earelu! study ol tha best methods of 
other growers, 

qif yon read this book you will keep it lor future re.erer.oe. It is a worth 
while" publication. 



The Coe-Mortimer Company 

51 CHAMBERS STREET, NEW YORK CTTY 



8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 20, 1914- 



I 



JOIN THE BUNCH AT 



EPSTEINS TAILORING PARLORS 

Now located ov?r post ollicc. Up one Might 

Pressing and Cleaning a Specialty 

l-iln-i.il Tickrt System Tel. 36-M 

T. MIBOTKA. 

SHOE STORE 

Shoes Repaired by Machinery 

SHOE SHINE 

Open Sunday from 7.13. On your way to F, O, 

The Highland Hotel 

Corner ol Hillni.in and Barnes Streets, three 
blacks from the Union Depot, is ■ modern hos- 
telry run on the European Flan. It is just a step 
from Main Street, away from tlie noise and dust 
and vet in the center of the business district. 

Its rooms are well furnished and comfortable, 
having a telephone and hot and cold running 
water in every room. Prices •! and up; rooms 
with bath (single) •1.5© and up. 

Its excellent cuinineanj well ventilated dining 
room makes a meal a pleasant memory— every- 
thing of the highest quality, well cooked mad 
served in the best possible manner. 

Stay at the Highland Hotel ouce and you will 
anticipate staying there again. Music every 
evening, 

D. H. SIEVERS, 

HlghUad Hotel, Springfield, M ■ -« 



8TUDEPTFU8HIW 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to oiler an absolute lower price, 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Oilers courses of instruction in twenty eight teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



FOUNTAIN PENS 

Moore's Swan's 

Waterman's 

Thirty-six dozen pens to select from, 
OUR RULE 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 



Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 

Agricultural Chemistry 



Agricultural Economics 

Rural Sociology 

Economic Entomology 

Microbiology 

Plant Physiology and Pathology 

Agricultural Education 

Kiiral Social Science 

For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 

KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded." 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



E. D. MARSH ESTATK 



COX SONS 



— AND — 



f*T <VM VINING 

7*?4 Madison Avenue, New York 

CAPS AND GOWNS 

Best Materials and Workmanship 



Joint Committee on lutereollegiate Athletics, 

M. A. C. Athletic Flc'd Association. 

The College Senate, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association. 

Hockey Association, 

Tenuis Association, 

Ride club, 

Roister Doisters 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Fifteen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Sixteen Index, 

M. A. C. Christian Association, 

M. A. C. Catholic Club. 

Fraternity Conferem ••. 

Stockbridge Club, 



.1. F. Nicholson, Prod 



Philip H- Smith, Secretary 
('. S. Hicks, Treasurer 
E. Towne, Piesident 
.1. A. Price, Manager 
S. Prouty, Manager 
E. F. Clark, Manager 
E. S. Draper, Manager 
II. Bishop, Manager 
R. M. Upton, President 
ncing and Business Manager 
F. A. Anderson, Manager 
H. M. Rogers, Manager 
L. E. Fielding, Manager 
H. II. White, President 
.1 . E. Harper, President 
F. W. Buell, President 
P. F. Whitmore, President 



K«T4Mi.i«t.»i. imri 

Stkphbn Lane Folqbh 

HANUrAOl'URINO jHWHLKR 

ISO BROADWAY, NBW YOBK 

CLUB AND COLLEGE 
PINS AND RINGS •* 

<)OI,I>, MII.VWR AMD HWONBW MBLML8 



RAHAR'S INN 

Northampton, MUMCkOMlU 
TWO BLOCKS FROM THE DEPOT 

The hotel where there is comfort (with- 
out extravagance.) More popular 
than ever. 

Special luncheon 12-2 P. M. 

PRIVATE DININC ROOMS 
A la Carte Service 

\ rom 6 JO toll P. M. 



I here are Seven (Jood Reason* whv \<>u»liould 

liDV vour 



COAL 



or 



C. R. ELDER 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 



>7 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



Stationery, Newspapers, 
Magazines and Col- 
lege Supplies 

A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer. 



The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Mt., alongside the 
famous Woody Brook battle ground 
to Old Deerfield, thence to Green- 
field, Turners Falls and across the 
"Plains" to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 

50 Mile* of Trackage -flodern 
Equipment -Train Dispatch- 
ing System -Freight and Ex- 
press Service over entire Hoe. 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway 



CARS 

Leave AOOIE COLLEGE for MOL- 
YOKE at 15 mill, past the hour. 

CARS 

Leave AMHERST tor AOOIE COL- 
LEOE at 7 and 37 mln. past the hour. 



at 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 



M 



CtcttJ mly firm* t A. M. U 4 A. M, 



For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of " Gold Medal Uniform*, " ' * 

1434-1426 Chestnut St., Phttad^pWa, Fa, 



AMHERST & SUNDERLAND ST. 8! CO 

For a Daily and Sunday Newspaper] 
You should Read 

Springfield Republican 

While you are at college in Amherst 

It liwanll of-riir M.A. C.HeWS 

Tin- Beat .iport inic Mewa 
••■■ii General n .■ « - 
A Strong Editorial P*a« 
I nt*>r.«t I njc Ftslnm 
It !■ a Real Hawapapor 



Daily, 3 cents ; 70 cents a month} »».<■: 
a quarter, 

Sunday, 5 cents; S e «■*■ * qa^*** 1 "- 
Subscribe bf mail or through the Ambcrit Ni 




S • COLLEGIAN 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXV. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, October 27, 1914. 



No. 7 



TRYOUTS FOR FIRST PLAY 

SHOW EXCELLENT TALENT 

Roister Doisters to Tour New York 
and New Jeraey in "Her 

Husband's Wife". 

The Roister Doisters have selected 
their first play for the year and re- 
hearsals for it are being conducted 
regularly. The play that has been 
chosen is a clever and witty farce 
comedy, teeming with laughter and 
splendidly satirical of the wife of 
hypochondriacal tendency, addicted 
to ''remedies." It is entitled "Her 
Husbands Wife" and is from the i>en 
of A. K. Thomas, dramatic critic of 

the New York 8ttn. The comedy 

holds the unqualified endorsement of 
New York, Chicago and Philadelphia 
and is considered by many to be one 
of the most desirable plays and surest 
winners of the season. Henry Mil- 
ler, Robert War wick and Laura Hope 
Crcwa starred in the original produc- 
tion and played in it for two eonsecu- 
Ure seasons to large Broadway audi- 
ences. There are at the present time 
several stock companies who are in- 
cluding it in their repertoire but as 
far as is known the Hoister Doisters 
are the first amateur company that 
has been able to obtain it. 

The try-outs for the caste have been 
going on for a week and while the 
different parts have not been defi- 
nitely assigned, I tentative caste is 
now rehearsing. All plays for the 
year will be under the personal direc- 
tion of Manager Nicholson. No out- 
side coach has been secured as it has 
n thought best to make this pro- 
duction entirely original with the 
ideas of the members of the society. 
The gowns and coatnmingof this pro- 
duction will also be original with the 
management and already designs for 
this part of the production are being 
drawn up. 

•'Her Husband's Wife" will be 
used on the Christmas trip to New 
York and vicinity and should prove 
to be the best play ever produced by 
the society. An excellent trip has 
been arranged that will include many 
of the larger cities in the immediate 
vicinity of New York city. It is 
probable that several of the. smaller 
towns that the society played to in 
former years will be dropped from the 
list this year as it is thought bent to 
••ranch out into larger fields of work. 

II.— H. W. Blaney, landscape 

•I tension department, Univ. of Illi- 
1 ">is, Ufbana, IU, 



TUFTS GAME^ALUMNI OF 
BOSTON TO "MOBILIZE" 

The only Boston game of the 
season, the Tufts game, is played 
at Medford, Saturday — the only 
chance we eastern Massachusetts 
fellows have to let out our little 
yell for the team. 

Don't plan to go home right af- 
ter the game ! An alumni feed 
and old time "get together" is 
planned immediately following the 
game, at the United States Hotel 
— for all alumni from *71 to '14. 

Hemember — Saturday at 2-'M). 
Tufts Oval. Medford, and at 5-80 
the United State* Hotel, Boston. 

I\ W. l*n KAitn, Sec. 
Mass. Alumni Ass'n of M. A. C. 



WORLD PEACE MOVEMENT SUPERIOR LINE PLUNGING 

EXPLAINED TO STUDENTS WINS FOR AGGIE SECONDS 



JUNIORS WIN MEET 



Richards Leads in Five Mile Course 

Over Hills. Aiken and 

Coley Follow. 

Banning strong and apparently 

able to do the course again Hichards 
led the 1916 cross country team to 
victor? in the interelass run on Tues- 
day. Following close behind was 
Captain Aiken, also of 'Ifi.and Colev, 
who won the HUM last year was the 
third '16 man tofinish. Pratt, the 
first sophomore to finish nosed out 
Russell '16 at the tape in I gruelling 
sprint. Mitchell '18 was the first 
freshman to finish, landing ninth 
place By capturing eighth place 
the juniors made their score l'.i 
points while the sophomores gathered 
in second place with ■">•*» and the fresh- 
men were third with $2. Day was 
the only '!."> man in the race ami 
although he finished the seventh the 
senior team was placed last." 

The coin>e was a real hill and dale 
affair. The start was made from the 
drill hull. The runners went by 
Clark hall, over I'rcxy's hill and then 
down to Lovers' lane. They came 
along that nearly to the Experiment 
station and then started over the hill 
again, crossed the C. V. tracks back 
across the tracks again through Wild- 
wood cemetery and down East Pleas- 
ant street to Mt. Pleasant, thence 
over the ridge to Fearing street. 
The course continued down Fearing 
to Lincoln avenue and finished at the 
Drill hall. 

Richards ran a heady race and led 
nearly all the way. The first three 

[Continued on page <>] 



Representative of World Peace Found- ; 

ation Tells Assembly of His 

Investigations. 

Mr. Edwin D. Meade,of the World 
Peace Foundation, Boston, addressed 
the student body at Wednesday'.-. 
assembly on the subject "The United 
States and a United World " Mr. 
Meade was in Europe when the pres- 
ent war broke out, studying condi- 
tions there relative to peace, and his 
talk was exceedingly interesting. 
The substance of the address was as 
follows : 

"In the first plane, there will nevei 
he permanent peace until substantial 
self-government becomes general in 
the world. We find the peace move- 
ment strong precisely where there is 
self-government, while where the gov- 
ernment is autociatic there is a feeble 
feeling for peace. Remember partic- 
ularly that when you hear in ■ 
democracy people urging greater 
armaments, there is a spirit abroad 
which hinders true democracy. 

"Washington, Franklin and .btt. 1- 
son all championed the peace move 
ineiit instead of the war idea. These 



[Continued "n pagr i\ 



ON TO TUFTS 

■S08P1 ' I- " ,l; VNMM -.AMI. WITH 
MKI'Konn KIN M.S. 

On Oct 81, after a two weeks' 
respite, the varsity football team 
meets one of its hardest opponent! 
of the seaaon in the Tufts team, ■ 
team which has scored a total of I'JM 
points against its opponents* oU 
[joints, with three victories ami two 
defeats. Tufts started off with an 
84 victory over New Hampshire, 
following this by defeating Bates 
HI -7. The ihird week ||W Tufts 
win oxc, Colby 40-11. On Oct. 17 
they OtJtplftyed Harvard in the Sta- 
dium only to lose by a 1.3-6 boore. 
Last week Tufts suffered the only 
relapse she has hail this seaaon los- 
ing to Rutgers 16-7, because of the 
inability of the team to complete the 
long forward passes which they bav« 
used to eHceeaafally the entire 
season. Westcott and O'Dormell of 
Tufts were hurt in this game, but it 
is expected they will be able to play 
in the M. A. C, game. 

The Massachusetts team has been 
coming fast since the Colby game. 



[Continued on page 1] 



T. M. C. A. Seconds Show Good Punt- 
ing and Forward Passes 
but Fail to Score. 

In a close, exciting game, the M. 
A. C. second team defeated the 
Springfield Y. M. C. A. College sec- 
ond team 7-0 on the campus Satur- 
day. It was a clean-cut, hard- 
fought game of straight football, 
with the ball see-sawing back and 
forth about the middle of the field 
for the greater part of the game. 
Straight rushing wbb used almost 
entirely by both teams except in the 
last quarter when Springfield tried 
several forward passes, only one of 
which was successful. The line 
plunging of Rich and Little on 
delayed passes featured the game 
from the Aggie standpoint and Cap- 
tain Murphy also showed good judg- 
ment in selecting his plays. Smith 
and Kindle were the stars xif the 
Springfield team, the former showing 
up best as an open field runner and 
punter while the latter did good work 
on both the offence and defence. 
raUfT ol AKTKK. 

Murphy won the loss for M. A. C. 
ami chose the south goal, Springfield 
kicking off, On the second play 
Springfield intercepted a forward 
pass and after failing to gain Smith 
dropped bank for a goal from the. 
field. The kick was partially / 
blocked and it was Aggie's ball Ofl 
her own "it) yard line. Hieh and Lit- 
tle advanced the ball to mid-field on 
a aeries of line plunge*. Btn 
Springfield recovered a fumble and 
Kindle made 20 yards around right 
end. Holies it-covered a fumble and 
Rich and Little advanced the ball 26 
yards where Dow ling intercepted a 
foi ward pass. Smith kicked to 
Murphy ami on the next play Dan- 
fortfa returned it. The quarter ended 
with the ball in Springfield's posses- 
sion on Aggie's 15 yard line. 

noOVD qrARTKK. 

Smith was thrown for a a yard 
loss bv Day, and Mm \ ill made 7 
yards at light tackle. Smith tried 
for l drop kick, the ball going wide 
and becoming Aggie's bull on her 
own SO yard Hue. Little and Rich 
advanced steadily to Spriugfield's 40 
yard line where they were finally 
halted. Danforlh kicked to Kvans, 
Day downing the latter in his tracks. 
Smith made a beautiful 80 yard run 




The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 27, 1914* 



around left end. Springfield fum- 
bled, recovered and on the next play 
Smith punted to Murphy, who 
dropped the ball. Brown scooped it 
up and started toward the goal but 
dropped the ball when Little tackled 
him, Rich recovering for M. A. C. 
Little and Rich failed to gain and 
Danforth kicked to Evans. A for- 
ward pass, Evans to Smith, netted 7 
yards. Kvans failed at center and 
Marvill made 9 yards at left tackle. 
A forward pass failed. Williams 
substituted for Dunn and Springfield 
was held for downs. Dau forth 
kicked to Kvans. Here the M. A. 
C. line stiffened, getting the ball on 
downs just as the half ended. 

THIHl) O.UAKTKU. 

Jordau kicked off to Mason who 
was thrown in his tracks. After 
failing to gain, Smith kicked to 
Murphy, who ran the ball buck 10 
yards. When Holies and Murphy 
failed to gain Jordan kicked to 
Dowling who dropped the ball. Day 
recovering for Aggie. Rich and 
Little brought the ball to Spring- 
field's 2'> yard line wheie Springfield 
held for downs. Kvans and Kindle 
failed to gain and Rlaisted recovered 
Dowling's fumble on Springfield's 9 
yard line, Kiltie taking the ball over 
in three rushes. Murphy punted out 
to Kith who kicked the goal. Score 
M. A. C. -'ud, 7; Springfield 2nd, 0. 
Danforth kicked off to Mason. It 
was Aggie's ball on her own 4* yard 
line when Smith punted outside. 
Holies, Rich, and Kittle then marched 
down the field to Springfield's 9 yard 
line before the whistle blew. 



Score— M. A. C. and, 7; Springfield 
2nd, o. Touchdown— Kittle. Goal from 
touchdown- Rich. Referee— Chapman. 
Umpire— Melican. Time— 12 minute 
quarters. 



ADDRESS ON WORLD PEACE 

[Continued from page 1] 



FOUKTU OJ'AKTKIt. 

As it was fourth down and 4 to go, 
Springfield stiffened and held for 
downs. After Kvans, Marvill, and 
Kindle had failed to gain, Smith 
booted the ball .">'» yards to Holies 
who juggled it and was nailed in his 
tracks by Kindle. Kittle and Holies 
took the ball 10 yards when Hrown 
intercepted a forward pass. Here 
Springfield attempted its famous 
open formation in a desperate at- 
tempt to tie the score, but with little 
success, After a successful forward 
pass, the Aggie line held and Smith 
kicked to Murphy who was dropped 
by Kindle. Kittle and Rich made 2S 
yards in five rushes when Bolles fum- 
bled, the ball going to Springfield on 
Aggie's 40 yard line. A forward 
pass, Smith to Kvans, netted BO 
yards and after two more incomplete 
passes, time was called with the ball 
in Springfield's possession on the M. 
A. C. *20yard line. 
The summary : 

M. A. C. 180, Sl'KINGFlEU) 2MB, 

Day, !« re, Zielminsky, Brown 

Plaiated, It rt. Mason, Capt. 

Dunn, Williams, lg rg, Higbee 



ON TO TUFTS 

[Continued from page 1] 

and it is certain that the team will 
go at Tufts with the old Massachu- 
setts spirit of do or die, and make a 
splendid showing. The student 
body is greatly disappointed at the 
ineligibility of one junior and two 
sophomores, Jordan, Higginbotham 
and Dunn, all three of whom have 
rendered valuable service to the var- 
sity this season. Coach Brides has 
the task on his bands of finding men 
to fill these vacancies before the 
team journeys to Medford. Tufts is 
not invincible— although she has a 
good record— ami it is the hope of 
the student body that Massachusetts 
mav give her her third defeat of the 
season. 

An alumni dinner will be held at 
the United States hotel following the 
game at which it is expected that a 
large number of the alumni support- 
ers of the team will be present. 

Already ■ great deal of enthusiasm 
has been aroused over the coming 
football game with Tufts. Kvery 
evening at supper there has been 
cheering for the team and its various 
members, while each afternoon a 
growing crowd has been out on the 
si.le-lines watching the practice and 
cheering. 

Friday evening a mass meeting 
was held in the chapel with practi- 
cally the entire student body present. 
The program arranged by Cheer 
Leader Farrai included speeches by 
Dr. Anderson, Professor Lock wood, 
Mr. Whittier, Draper 'l'>, and Masse 
•1"). Kverybody cheered and sang 
themselves hoarse after which Farrar 
urged everyone to go over to the 
Drill Hall and sign up for the special 

train. 

About _'i>0 men have already signi- 
fied their intention of making the 
trip, but 200 is not enough ; 400 are 
wanted at that game to help the 
team win and also to show the Tufta 
crowd what kind of spirit there ia 

here. 

Between the halves of the second 
team's game on Saturday, the men 
showed their spirit in the shape of a 
monster parade. Headed by an im- 
provised baud and by men bearing 



placards with "Pep," "Oa to Tufta" 



Verbeck, c 

Jordan, rg 
Danforth, rt 
Higginbotham, re 
Murphy, qb 
HolleOhb 
Rich, rhb 
Little, fb 



c, Harvey 

lg, Hlickley 

It, Buiey 

le, Kindle 

qb, Dowling 

rhb, Brown, Smith 

Ihb, Evans 

lb, Smith, Marvill 



etc., the whole student body formed 
in single file and marched around the 
field in lock-atep. 

Now men, if you can show all that 
pep up here on the campua, are you 
sincere enough to make it carry you 
down to the Tufts game ? We don't 
want to make a poor showing when 
we march to the field and everyone 
who is not there detracts from that 
parade. Is your pep true or is it 
just on the surface? The list will 
tell who the Boyal Rooters are. la 
YOUR name going to be there? 



men would have taken no interest in 
establishing the United States if they 
had thought it would merely be the 
same kind of a nation as the European 
countries. These men hoped for a 
new era for mankind — one of peace, 
friendship and co-operation. Jeffer- 
son saw, a century and a quarter ago, 
that construction must replace 
destruction. 

••The first peace society in the 
world was organized in 1815 by 
David Lowe Dodge of New York, 
The second was established late in 
the same year in Boston. These 
societies were engaged in an effort 
which has culminated in the Hague 
Conferences, to organize the family 
of nations as we have organized this 
family of states, and to settle differ- 
ences by reason instead of by war. 

"There are three great develop- 
ments which the United States has 
brought out in this country, and 
which must be embodied in any great 
world peace movement. These are 
free trade, a supreme court, and our 
principle of federation. Remember 
this : in the great market of the 
Uuited States the great amount of 
foreign commerce is still not as great 
as our domestic trade, simply because 
we have no duties to pay in trade 
between states. When trade is made 
easier in the world iu general by abol- 
ishing all custom-houses between 
nation*, there will be a much stronger 
friendship between all the countries. 
"The United States Supreme Court 
is one of the greatest institutions in 
the world today. It has settled dis- 
putes between states and individuals 
and has decided peaceably many 
boundary disputes more serious than 
the sources of the Kuropean quarrels 
now going on. What the world 
needs is a Supreme Court of the 
World, which will permit disputes to 
be settled by common seuse instead 
of by armies. 

"The principle of Federation is 
most important, for it has brought 
about the greatest consolidation in 
this republic. The United States fs 
in closer relation today with Chile, 
Brazil, England, Turkey, or Japan, 
than the state of Massachusetts was 
with Florida in the early history of 
the United States. The great danger 
to the world today is the tendency of 
men to consider themselves citizens 
of their own particular countries 
rather than citizens of the world. 
The European nations are paying an 
awful penalty because of anarchy, 
and they are finding out that organi- 
zation and co-operation la absolutely 
necessary. Present day politics is 
fifty years behind the civilization we 
have achieved. 

"War never settles anything 
except the strength of fighting forces. 
Victory often comes to the side of 
injustice and oppression. When an 
affair is settled by arbitration it hi 
settled for good. Four hundred 



agreements have thus been made 
between nations, and all weie. accepted 
and permanent. No enforcement 
was necessary. 

"Our own republic with its free 
trade, supreme court, and federal 
government, furnishes the proposi- 
tion which alone can bring a solution 
to the anarchy of the world. All the 
European nations are looking toward 
the United States almost pitifully, 
and this nation will undoubtedly exer- 
cise the strongest good offices for the 
advantage of the world. ThiB war is 
costing fifty million dollars a day and 
is an awful horror. In ray opinion it 
will be settled within six months. 

"We should be thinking of the 
manner in which we can reorganize 
the world, as this is the duty of the 
coming generation. World politics 
is the coming thing. Fix your minds 
upon the fundamental principles and 
resolve that the United States shall 
do its part toward establishing greater 
unity. Let us all work together for 
the common welfare." 



N1NETEER-THIRTEEN NOTES 
J. L. Holden, a Philadelphia chem- 
ist, is spending two weeks at home 
in Palmer. 

C. M. Packard, government ento- 
mologist, haa been transferred to 
Wellington, Kans., where he is now 
working on the Hessian Fly problem. 
Isaac Coleman, official tester for 
the Skaneateles Cow TeBt associa- 
tion, is now engaged in making a 
summary of the records of those 
herds which have been in test for 
one year. These records will enable 
the members to eliminate the boarder 
cows, reduce cost of production, etc. 
Address, General Delivery, Skaneat- 
eles, N. Y. 

Forbush and Charlie Streeter did 
the Kanaas wheat fields during July 
and spent the month of August recu- 
perating from effects of same. 
"Forbie," who is leaving for Porto 
Rico where he will teach agriculture 
this winter, aays that they gave the 
men one-half hour off at noon and 
the horses two hours,and work started 
in at 4 a. m, and kept np till 9 p. u. 



MO. — L. G. Schermerhorn has been 
appointed instructor in market gar- 
dening at the New Jersey Agricultural 
college. He la also to be connected 
with the experiment station along the 
same line of work ; the appointment is 
to take place Nov. 1st. Schermerhorn 
has until recently been connected 
with Montana Agricultural college 
and experiment station. 

FOR GOOD "EATS" 



86 PLEASANT ST. 



Mrs. J. K. W. Davenport 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 27, 1914. 



FRESHMAN FOOTBALL 

In spite of another whitewash the 
freshman football team showed the 
best form of the season in their game 
with the Connecticut Literary Insti- 
tute eleven. The final score was 
6-0 in favor of the Suffield team. 
The teams were well matched and at 
times both sides exhibited real 
football. 

In the second period the freshmen 
held their opponents for downs with- 
in six inches of their own line. 
Shortly after, the only touchdown of 
the game was made by Caldwell on a 
27 yard run around left tackle. 
Twice in the last quarter the fresh- 
men came within striking distance of 
the C. L. 1. line, but failed to push 
the pigskin over. Caldwell and 
Saunders were conspicuous on the 
Suffleld team, and Sawyea and Gray- 
son played well for the freshmen. 

The lineup : 
. . u 1. m. a. c. '18. 

Cashen, Malcolm, le re. Faber, Uurch 



rt. Holmes 

rg, Roberts 

c, Tihon 

Ig, Raymond, Sullivan 

It, Capen 

le. McKee 

qb, Chambers 

Minor 

rayson 



Hradley, It 

brown, lg 

I'effers, c 

Reynold, rg 

Shutter, rt 

MacArthur, re 

Saunders, qb 

H. Caldwell, j |||h 
Cashen, S 

u'^%1 11 [rhb 
II Caldwell, ( 

Richards, MacQuarrie, fb fb, Hawley 
Score— C. L. I. 6, Massachusets Aggie 
Freshmen o. Touchdown — Caldwell. 
Referee — Vinal of Springfield Y M. C 
A. College ; umpire— Whitehouse of 
Springfield; Head linesman — Lund of 
Sutfield. Time— ia minute periods. 



rhb,jM, 
"HL°l e y y er 



INDEX ANNOUNCEMENT 

At the end of this month alt copy 
for the 1916 Index will be in the 
hands of the printers. This means 
that the book is virtually completed, 
and insures its appearance on campus 
before the Christmas vacation. Spec- 
ulations as to the contents of the pub- 
lication are already rife, and the 
ooard is continually besieged for 
more definite information. In 
response to these inquiries the editor- 
in-chief baa released the following 
data in regard to the book for pub- 
lication in tile Colmgiah . 

Several innovations and entirely 
new features have been introduced 
in the Ivdxx. The first Is ia the 
treatment of the faculty section. 
Instead of the individual cuts of the 
professors a group picture baa been 
used, thus doing away with many 
obsolete pictures that were no longer 
likenesses, and substituting an up-to- 
date photograph. A second feature 
is a section devoted to a series of 
pictures of the campus taken about 
23 years ago. For purposes of 
comparison a set of pictures have 
been taken this fall from the same 
l»olots of view, showing the tre- 
nendous changes that have taken 
,»lace. Alumni and undergraduates 
alike will be interested in this ex- 
ceptional feature. 

The section devoted to the Junior 



class is entirely original in its form 
and material. The drawings for 
the book have been carefully made 
and form one of the features of the 
publication because of their quality 
and originality. 

While it is impossible to enumer- 
ate the contents of the book, in some 
ways it is easiei to give an idea of 
what has not been included. The 
editors have tried to keep the tone 
of the book above reproach. There 
is no sarcasm thrown at the faculty. 
Some members of the faculty, by 
their very nature, cannot pass un- 
noticed, but their introduction to 
the public is fair. Members of the 
clasa need not fear seeing themselves 
belittled in print ; they get their 
share of comment, but in just fash- 
ion. Thus the process of elimina- 
tion has been as careful as the 
method of selection. In one sense 
the Index is an advertisement of the 
college, and every effort has been 
made to make this book a first class 
advertisement of a first class college. 

The business department an- 
nounces that tickets may be obtained 
from Fielding, Hathaway, Mooney 
and sin rin van and also at the "dog 
cart." Furthermore, 350 Indexes, 
bound in strong flexible bag leather 
and selling for $2,50 will be on sale 
before Christmas among 670 stu- 
dents. "A word to the wise is 
sufficient." 



OR. R. C. 

Dentist 

NASH'S BLOCK 
Evenings by Appointment. 



LAUHOvrrae 

Tailor and PftESSEJL, 

Gents' Furnishings- Dress Suits to 

Rent—Drill Gloves and Collars 

Tli KBT Si vi 1 m. 

11 Amii.v.si. i>none 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

The Floriculture department is now 
located in the new French hall, along 
with the departments of Forestry and 
Market Gardening. This building is 
perhaps the best equipped on the 
campus for the technical lines it 
houses. One of the recent additions 
is a new Thompson reflectoscope. 
A new inter-room telephone system 
and a system connecting all the 
departments of the horticulture group 
have been installed. The depart- 
ment of Horticulture intends to make 
a feature of herbaceous perennials 
and in view of this fact about 100 
varietiea of the beat in the trade have 
been secured. These will be added 
to each year until the best species 
are represented. The junior flori- 
culture class of this year is double 
that of any previous year. The 
class recently took a trip to Smith's 
Ferry where a new modern house is 
in course of construction. All sen- 
iors in floriculture were engaged in 
practical work last summer, a point 
which is emphasized at M. A. C. 

Professor Peters of the Chemistry 
department has recently issued a 
laboratory manual in agricultural 
chemistry for the use of students at 
the Massachusetts Agricultural col- 
lege. 

The manual includes the prepara- 
tion of such substances as super- 
phosphates, potash salts, sulfate of 
ammonia, arsenate of lead, Paris 
green, lime sulphur and Bordeaux 
mixture. The student will prepare 
these substances practically in the 
laboratory and at the same time will 
gain a very clear understanding of 
the chemical processes involved. 



High Grade Furnishings 




© A.B. K. Co.. 19H 



Travel the country over and you'll not 
find a choicer or a better line of Men's 
Toggery than you'll find right here. 

The best shirt makers, underwear 
makers, scarf makers and glove 
makers send us these productions. 

The Best in Every Line 
isjlere. 

Then again, we are not high priced. 
All the patrons of this store know 
this to be a fact. Test us and see. 

See our new Manhattan and Monarch 
Shirts, $1.50 to $2.50. 

Look at out (iloves, $1.00 10 $2.50. 

See our Neckwear, 25c to $1.50. 



Two Hundred Mackinaw* Now Ready for Your Inspection. 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 

AllllHTHt 



! 

Twenty-five cents will be put in a box for tbe 
NEW ATHLETIC FIELD every time you 
buy shoes at our store costing $3.50 or over. 

VERY LATEST STYLES. 

Shoes for the Drill-|2.50 to $5.00 

Paae^as Shoe JStoi^e 



School and College Photographers . . . 




LOC4LL/.' 5» Center St., Northampton, Mass., 

and South Hadley, Mass. 



Main Office: 

1546-1548 Broadway, 

New York City 



These Studio* offer the beit skilled 

artist* nnd most complete 

equipment obtainable 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



■PKAI.EKS IN- 









I 



I 



Dry and Fancy Goads and Choice Family Groceries 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 27, 1914- 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

Editor-in-Chief 
Managing Editor 
Assistant Editor 



the end of seveu 



Athletic Editor 
Athletic Editor 



FRANK W. BUEIX »i5. 

TYLER S. ROOERS'16, 

HENRY H. WHITE '15. 

JAMES A. PRICE'15. 

E. SUMNER DRAPER 'i;. 

THOS L. HAR ROCKS M6, Department Editor 

AI FRED \. GIOIOSA'i6, Campus Editor 

FRANK A. SCHEUFEt.E, Alumni Editor 

MILFORD R. I.AWRENCE'17. 

Associate Editor 
RICHARD W. SMITH '17, Associate Editor 



BDSIHK8S DEPARTMENT. 

MAURICE J. CLOUGH '15. Business Manager 
CHAS A. HUNTINGTON. JK.'l6, 

Assistant Business Manager 
W.RICHARD SEARS '15. Advertising Man'tfr 
LESTER E. FIELDING "16, Ass't Adv. Mgr. 
BIRGER R. ROSEQUIST'17. Circulation 



Subscription $150 per year. Single 
copies, s cents. Make all orders payable 
to Maurice J. CLOUOH. 



Entered a* second-cUsa matter at the Amherst 
Part Offte*. 

Vol. XXV. Tuesday, Oct. 27 No - 7 



"Aggie Loses," "M. A. C. De 
feated," "Mass. Aggies Out of Run- 
ning." Those tire the headlines tlmt are 
coming more and more to the at- 
tention of the reader of the sporting 
page of the present day newspaper, j 
To the question of "Why"? that is 
steadily growing in volume among the 
Alumni, the undergraduates and the 
friends of the College there is hut 
one answer. The athletic teams are 
on a steadily accelerated decline at 
this College for one reason and one 
alone, and that is because the men 
that can play either football, base- 
ball, hockey ot tan tun are not com- 
ing to this college. 

Realizing the serious state of af- 
fairs, we are moved to say that from 
our viewpoint, and we think that is 
the undergraduates* stand, the reason 
that these men are not coming to this 
college is entirely due to Faculty 
action. This is evidenced in various 
ways. Perhaps one way that is par- 
ticularly fresh in the minds of the 
student body is the Iran's list of 
men that are low and below in the 
various subject!. According to the 
eligibility rules, that govern whether 
a man shall represent the College on 
a team or not, four fust team football 
men will be unable to play for the 
remainder of lb* season. We, moat 
assuredly, do not believe that there 
should be any lowering of the eligi- 
bility rules or that this college should 
be changed into what is known u a 
"football college," but why would it 
not have been fairer to the men in 
question and to the team ai a whole 
if the first Dean's Saturday had come 
a month after college opened? The 
second Saturday would then come 
before the season was over and would 
have allowed a man to get up again 
to his studiei for the big games of the 
year. After this Dean's Saturday 
the lists are posted every month ; why 
oould not the first list have been 
posted at the end of the first month 



rather than at 
weeks? 

This is given but as an illustration 
and it is really of hut incidental im- 
portance. Of more importance is 
the fact that there are set aside a 
certain number of waiterships in the 
Dining hall for wearers of the "M." 
This is done at other colleges in re- 
cognition of the fact that a man that 
does something for his college is de- 
serving of an opportunity to work if 
the work is needed. Positions in the 
Dinmg hall are utilized for this pur- 
pose as the nature of an atheletc's 
practice hourB prevents him from 
obtaining work that comes at other 
hours. At present there are not 
enough "M" men in college in the 
major sports to make use of all these 
waiterships. Yet when a man, who 
would be able to help a team along, 
has applied for admission and asks 
if he will be able to obtain work he 
is told that he can not, in all proba- 
bility, before his senior year. Of 
course that man will go to another 
college where there is more chance 
of working his way through the four 

years. 

Athletes have the reputation of 
being poor students. Perhaps if this 
statement were analyzed it would be 
found that all facts in the case had 
not been taken into consideration. 
When a man is out on the football 
Held practicing two hours a day for 
five days and has a game at the end 
of the week with a consequent trip, 
he has not the time to put on his 
studies that the man has who just 
"comes to college for four years." 
At the end of the season a man who 
dm thus been engrossed in athletics 
has the time to put in on his studies 
and he gets right down to work. Is 
any notice taken of this or because 
he has been low in two Dean's lists 
is he made a mark for an example 
of delinquency and flunked out of col- 
lege at the end of the semester? 

Is there any chance that there is a 
mistake in instruction or in the course 
of study wheu eighty per cent, of the 
Sophomore class is posted on the 
first Dean's list as being low or be- 
low in at least one subject? From 
the viewpoint of an upperclassman 
we would say that the first two years 
at this college, in regard to the curri- 
culum, is inestimably more difficult 
than the last two years. What chance 
has an athlete, if he has withstood 
the fact that he will receive no en- 
cooragement in obtaining work and 
has passed the entrance requirements 
without any assistance that he might 
legitimately expect, what chance has 
he of passing his classroom work 
when three quarters of his class art 
not doing it? Could not the first 
two years of studies be, in some way 
averaged up with the last two years? 
Perhaps it ii said that there were 
good teams at this college five years 
ago. There were, but conditions 
have changed. This year's football 
team ti an average team for the 
College- There ore nine upperclass- 



ShgllS 

Plenty of them. 

12, 16 and 20 Gage 

Almost anything you want in size of shot. 

Black or Smokeless Powder 

Guns to Let by the Day 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 27, 1914. 



The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

Jobbers of Wrought Iron and Brass Pipe. Valves 
*nd Fittings for Steam, Water and Gas. Asbestos 
and Magnesia Holler and Pipe Coverings, Hlpe 
Cut to Sketch, Mill Supolies. Engineers and 
Contractors for steam and Hot Water H rating, 
Automatic Sprinkler Systems, Boiler and Engir>e 
Connections. - Holyoke, Mass. 



HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The REXALL Store on the Corner 



UNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

KK.tl AK SUNDAY SKKVICE AT 7 P M. 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 



MODERN REPAIR DEPT. 



E. RUSSELL NORTON E.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOPMAN 



SALES AGENT 



E. E. MILLETT 



rx ~~~+ IVyinim- JEWELER and OPTOMETRIST 

Davenport Miller ^ ground white f OH walt 



Vein Coal 

Best Quality Pennsylvania Coal 



College Jewelky 
Violin. Banjo, Mandolin and Guitar Strings 

AMHKKST, MASS. 
Next to Host Office. 



BOSTON OFFICE 
85 Water St. 



NEW YORK OFFICE 

1 Broadway 



Amherst 



CO - OP LAUNDRY 



Reaervetl »< > ■• 



BECKMAN 



it » 1 1 » » 1 » ' 



LOW PRICE TAILORING CO. 

SUMS MADE TO ORDER 
Suits Cle.iiied. 1'iesscJ and Dyed. All ItincU of 
Kepairiha for Ladies anrt Gentlemen neath done. 
I fish-grade woik by first class tailor. "Work 
called for and delivered. Sell tickets fur pressing, 

4 SUITS KIM fl.>0 

GEORGE KOTOWITZ, Prop. 

Main Street. Amherst. Mass N.ish lllock 

On your way to the Husi ( Iffie* Tel. 4,:S \Y 



FLEMING'S SHOE STORE 



Northampton 



For particular people 

THE ELMS RESTAURANT 

2 13 Main St, f Northampton 

Neai \miu j t>t cftl Kit©! 

I Quality Restaurant at Moderate 
Prices. 



men on it, however, and in two years 
there will he practically no foothall 
material in college at the present rate. 
There are four football men in the 
Sophomore elftta and three of them 
are on the Dean's list. How mans 
of them will pase the semester's 
work'' In basehall there is bo var- 
sity material below the .Junior class, 
and no hope of any from the Fresh- 
men. Freshman football strength 
caa be estimated when ■ thought is 
given to their Reason's record of four 
straight defeats to date. Clearly 
then theft is practically no material 
in the two lower clftcaei for Brat 
teams of Massachusetts Usual stand- 
ing, excepting the few Sophomore 
football men that are now on the List. 

We are unable to propose an? ad- 
equate riMiiedv for these conditions 
uiil»>s the usual encouragement that 
is offered to entering athletes at other 
colleges might he practiced here. The 
undergraduate body has practically 
no power to do anything along this 
line and it is entirely a matter to 
which we heleive the Alumni should 
give their careful attention. 

Alumni Field is being completed 
to further athletic activities at this 
college. Who is going to J»hiy on 
it, ittterclaSS tennis teams and hoy's 
clubs or Aggie teams that are growing 
in strength and progress even as the 
College is growing in her standing in 
the scholastic world? 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 



Mr, Campion has just returned front) England with the 

AQUASCUTUM 

OVERCOATS 

Wells-Margetson Neckwear, Caps & Knitted Vests 

On account of war it will not be possible to get an}' more of 
these goods, so an early inspection will be to your advantage. 




Fine Tailoring Men's Furnishings 

See Our Agents — 



High-Grade College Work TR y QUR SPECIALS 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

CURRAN 6t DYER, Props. 

Loose- Leaf Note Books and Fountain 
-Pens- 



Shirts, 
Collars, 
Cuffs, - 
Plain wash, 
Same, rough dry 



10-15C 

2 I-2C 
2 I-2C 

48c per doz. 
- 30c per doz, 

DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, #1.5° a Suit 

R.T.FnoST.Agent; D. Shemnvan, Asst A^pnt 

Try our ticket system 

Put full name and address on laundry 



Come to us for- 



Fireplace Goods, Coat and Tronser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Dtensils 

Always glad to see you. 

THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 



And a la carte service. 

OYSTERS STEAKS CHOPS 
FRIED CHICKEN, ETC. 

( Ipen 6 a. M. to 1 1 r. M. 

FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

drown by the Florkultural Oept . 

We offer our surplut stock of cut 
flowers and plants at reasonable rates 
to students and faculty. This stock 
is grown in modern houses under 
ideal conditions, Roses, carnations, 
violets, chrysanthemums and sweet 
peas in season, 

GROWN ON THE CAMPUS 

I ' !• mIkiih' SOO 



Hubbard's BasE Fertilizers 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Everything in Photography 

Including Framing, 
(iood work speaks for Itself. 

[Nash Block, Amherst, Miss. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 
[ Notice* tor thi* column ihualdbr Ii 

thr < Hi i » i.t >N < <ttin- or rUsded I" \lfi- 
(HetOM' ift, i-ti .11 ln-fwf the Sfttlinfo) |.i"e<«dtnn 
»»,ich (isti*. 1 

1 1. roni ■ -*hi. 

1-10 v, m. — ABseinhlv. Dr. Ilenrv 
\\ iillnce, Kdiior WaJtam'g 
h'urmi r, Des .Moines, In. 

6-80 r. M — Buy's Ctab .it l'h\>ic:tl 

Director'* Office. 

i,-\:> v. M. — Muss Meeting in chapel, 

OCTOMS *2Ulll. 

$45 i- m K. A. ('. Catholic elub 

in South college. 
<> 1 . m.— Glee eluh rehearsal in 

chttpei- 

< >< TOCKB SlBT. 

9-00 \. m.— special train leaves for 

lloston, 
iU)t) e. st.— Football. Tufts HtMed- 

fortl. 

Football, Freshmen vs. 

Monson academy at Mon- 

son. 
5-80 i\ m, — Alumni reunion, United 

States hotel, Boston. 

NoVKMUKl! "iin •. 

7-:!'> r M, — Bible elftBs? on "Agri- 
cultural MlStiOM" ;itl)r. 
( 'bambcrlain'i home. 

§■45 v. m — Sophomore Class Sing 

in chapel. 
f,-,"»0 i«, m. — War lecture by Dr. 

Sp rag tie. 
7«#0 r. m.- Ulee club rehearsal in 

(Impel. 

8.00-7-16 p. m. — landscape Art 
club in Wilder hill* 

Novxirara 4th, 

I- 10 i; m.— Assembly, Pres, Ken- 
yon L. Butterfieid, Mass 
meeting. 




the most economical you can use. 

BetteR crops 



are the inevitable result, 



THE ROGERS $ HUBBARD COMPANY, Middletown, Conn. 

Ofltw ntwl Miirkii. I'orf ImihI, Conn. 



W% J t% are supplied every year 

ullFDCC S oCCQS direct to more L Ameri ' 
*^***r ww w ^w^^w can p j anters t j, an are 

the seeds of any other growers. Do \<ui know Burpee- 
Quality "Seeds that Grow" ? If not, we would like to 
make your acquaintance. Simply send us your address 
(a postal card will do) and you will receive Burpee's 
Annual for 1914, a bright new hook of 1 H2 pages, which 
is recognized as "The Leading American Seed Catalog." 
Kindly write to-day! Address 

W. ATLEE BURPEE & CO., Burpee Buildings, Philadelphia 



F. A. S 




MEN'S 



USE OUR NEW CASH DISCOUNT CARD 
AND SAVE FIVE PER CENT ON 

SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING 

Furnishings and Custom Tailoring 



Carp?n-ter & Morehoust, 

PRIflTEnii 



No. i, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mam. 



I 







The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 27, 1914- 



CAMPUS NOTES 
The following freshman otllcers 
have recently been chosen s Class his- 
toiiau, Harold K. Jones ; manager 
football, J. A. Chapman; manager 
track, Ralph W. Harwood ; manager 
basketball, P. F. Hunnewell ; captain 
football, G. F. Holmes, 

ProfeBsor Sprague of the Kco lomics 
department spoke in Westfield Friday 
evening under the auspices of the 
Westlield Board of Trade. His sub- 
ject was '-Municipal Government," 
a large and appreciative audience be- 
ing present at the lecture. 

Tuesday, Oct. 20, was Apple Day 
throughout the length ami breadth of 
the land but especially at M. A. C. 
The purpose of the day was to boost 
the apple into more general favor. 
In its observance apples were dis- 
tributed to all of the students and 
boxes were sent to all members of the 
faculty. 

Under the direction of Mr. Sawyer 
of the« heating and lighting plant a 
new water main is beiug laid to the 
site of the future infirmary. Attach- 
ing to a T connection on the plant 
bouse main, it leads down the hill to 
a point about two hundred feet be- 
vond Professor Waugb's residence, 
and thence at right angles through the 
woods. About seven hundred feet of 
mains will be required altogether, the 
Stockbridge road being closed to traf- 
fic until the work is completed. 

The first try-outs for the iuterclass 
debating teams were held last week 
Tuesday in UoomG, South college. 

THE 

Hoover & Smith Co. 

616 Chestnat St., Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 
Diamond Merchants 

Philadelphia's Official Fraternity Jeweler 

SPECIALISTS IN 

Fraternity Badge., Fob.. Novelties, 

Rings, Charm. Prises Trophies 

Medals College Pin., Fob.. Seal., 

Ring., Charm. 



Professor Smith of the English de- 
partment presided over the meeting ; 
Mr. Prince and Mr. Hand were also 
present Owing to the fact that only 
four persons entered the competition, 
it is improbable that anything very 
startling in the debating line will take 
place in the immediate future. 
Greater interest had been expected, 
and it is to be hoped that when the 
next meeting is announced a larger 
number of competitors will put in an 
appearance. For the sophomores 
those trying out were M. 1). Kelsey 
amlJ.T. Dizer; for the freshman, 
II. L. Uussell and L. E Wolfson. 



THE GERMAN ATTITUDE TOWARD THE WAR 



As Shown in the Translation of a 

Student. 



Letter from a German 



The following letter was recently it. Hut perhaps she has erred in 
received by a member of one of the : some of her plans. What may hap- 
lower classes from a German youth, pen in India or 1 
an inhabitant of Berlin, with whom 
he has been corresponding for two 
or three years. This man had been I 
a student in one of the great German I newspapers.f Also, here are a few 



casus the Russians already have a 
revolution on their hands. 

■'I am sending you some German 



CROSS COUNTRY 

[Continued from pSfC I 



men to finish ran the course well 
together. The first five men to finish 
will probably constitute the Varsity 
Cross Country team. This team 
will meet Vermont :it liurlingtou and 
will also run in the New Kughmcl 
IntercollegiaU's to be held either at 
Hanover, N. II. or Brooktine. 

The order of finishing was as 
follows: Richards 'H'., Aiken '16, 
Coley MS, Pratt '17, Russell '16, 
Bell'17. Day '15, Glover M<',, Mitch- 
ell 'IK, Brown MM, Flint M 7, Lyons 
'1H, Barnes MS, Baker Mh, Richard- 
ion '17, Chisholm 'IS, I.ieper '18, 
Howe 1H, Boaz '17, Bitter '17, Ran- 
dall' 17. 



*«»«.». — M. T. Smulyan, Ph. 1>., 
has been appointed assistant to the 
'State Kutomologistof Virginia. 
' address will be Blacksburg, Va 



II 



!■•» 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Now -t U Pleasant St. 
Octtlists' IV*BCrit4iirtM Pilled. Uroken lenses 

Accurately Replaced. Ha* Watch hvpsmii« 
Promptly and -kilfulh Donr. 

Satisfaction (iuaianteed 



"SCOTT3U" 
H. HOOPER 



E. B. DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

DKNTAL rooms 

Williams block, Amherst. Mas?. 

Office II no r*. »10lf* m . tje to 5 p. m. 



Telephone v»— K 



sTEAM FITTING 
GAS FITTING. TINNING. 

F. W. DANCE & CO., Plumbers 

Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, Memorial 

WlNOOWS, LEAO LIGHTS. &C. 

* Clifton Ave.. AMHKKST. MASS. 



Will dean and press your clothes so you 
will be satisfied. 1 1 costs no more 
and he is nearer to "Aggie 

11*R*AI TlfHKT SYSTEM 



THIS TBHPHY I'AMLOH 

Ctonnttefl P- W sl M It- pMlrtna; 

QatckMtf IM»r»U*. K«nt Work. L*W*S1 »*»"»«* 

\ll woik carefully done. Work called for and 
delivered, Gents* overeoats. suits, pants and 

Under Columbia Cafe \^ r ^f&i?^^fo. 

VI, FK.iMKMS. Prop. 
Rear Nash Bl'k. Amherst. Tel. No. wt 

Now is the time to be planning for 

FraternityGroups 

Have them taken at- 

MISS McCLELLA 

44 State Street, 



universities, but is apparently now 
with the armies of the Kaiser. It is 
especially interesting because it gives, 
at first hand, at least an idea of the 
answer to a question on which Ameri- 
cans can obtain but little information, 
that of the attitude of the German 
populace toward the- war The trans- 
lation is as literal as is consistent 
with good Knglish usage : 

Sunday, Aug. 2:5, 1314. 
Dear /•''/< ml : — 

"It is only cold realities that 1 am 
sending you today, nothing else. 

"Half Europe is against us. In 
the foreign countries the fabrications 
of Renter's Bureau and the Eiavaa 
Agency circulate almost exclusively, 
and against these our Wolff's Tele- 
graph Bureau can make no headway. 
"Germany has declared war on no 
one. Afh>r Russia had put her ;r»- 
cral mobilization machinery into 
motion, there followed the German 
mobilization, since Russia tlutly re- 
fined to aeoede to the German 
demand for a cessation of mobiliza- 
tion preparations. The troops of 
France then crossed our frontiers at 
the same time with the Russians and 
began the war. The Belgians per- 
mitted French aviators to lly over 
their territory toward Germany, and 
bv that act placed themselves upon 
the side of Fram e. Kven at the end 
of July 1 hey had issued an order re 
garding the exportation of grain, re- 
ferring by name to large German 
firms in Antwerp which wished to 
export goods to (Jermany. I shall 
not waste time speaking of the usual 
Knglish policy of holding back. The 
Britons are punished with contempt. 
I',, to this time we had considered 
them a proud, noble people. Japan's 
ultimatum will not be answered. 

"Is it not remarkable how the 
whole world is almost standing on its 
head to annihilate Germany V Fng- 
land and Russia together, who till 
now have always watched each other 
suspiciously in Rersia and on the 
Indian frontier: Japan and Russia 
together 5 France and Russia together, 
the so-called 'nation of culture' with 
the burning, slaying Coanaok hordes ! 
Germany lay in peace. Her enemies 
fell upon her from the east and the 
west and the north. Now we battle 
for our existence, for our honor, for 
our all. Responsibility fur the war 



news items 

"Immediately at the start Lueblieh 
fell into our hands. The French 
(one and one-half army corps in 
Alsace) are repulsed at Muelhausen. 
"August J*. The F:nglish "take" 
Tago, which is garrisoned by a single 
troop of police Our submarine U15 
sinks. Battle at Stallupouen. Three 
thousand Russians and six machine 
guns captured. The smaller happen- 
ings you can read in the newspapers. 
Up to this time we have had but one 
reverse, which was when the garrison 
of 1 fort made a premature sally. 

•August 19. A French cavalry 
division thrown back toward the north 
at Namur, Belgium. 

"August 20. Battle at Tirlemont. 
Field pieces, heavy artillery, and oOO 
standards captured. Small cruiser 
>Stiassburg" sends Knglish submarine 
to the bottom. German troops 
Occupy Brussels. 

"August 21. Great victory over 
more than eight French army corps 
between Met/, and Vogesen (Lor- 
raine). Ten thousand prisoners, 10 



guns 



etc. 



Austrian victory in 



"August '11- 
(Jalicia. 

"Goodbye, for today. 

"I have orders to take my place 
tomorrow. Previously I was rejected 
from six regiments. In all Germany 
l,_'<)(),000 men have enlisted of their 
own free will. That is tmr revolu- 
tion. With greetings, 

•Your friend, 

"J. L. M 

♦The uearest American equivalent 
for the literal translation "chauvin- 
ists". 

fThesedid not arrive, having prob- 
ably been confiscated by the British 
censor. 



HO 

Northampton, Mass, 



THE ROISTER DOISTERS 

All students desirous of joining 
the Roister Dotster Dramatic society 
and who have not yet signed tbei 
application this year should do so at 
once. Applications may be had of] 
Assistant Managers Haville and Wil- 
liams M7. This ruling applies to all.j 
whether former members or not, a#| 
a new membership list is being drawn] 
up which will go into effect the first] 
of November. After that date tlu 
qualifications for membership will be 
more rigid. 

All freshmen who are Intending t< 
trv out as candidates for Assistai 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 27, 19 14. 



NINETEEN SEVEN ADDRESSES 

Armstrong, Arthur H., deceased. 

Bartlett, Earle C, teacher, Kam- 
ehmeka Schools, Honolulu, Hawaii. 

Caruthers, J. Thomas, teacher, 
State Norma! School, Nashville, 
Tenn. 

Chace, Way land F., mailing ad- 
dress, Middleboro. 

Chapman, George II.. botanist, 
Experiment Station, Amherst. 

Chapman, Joseph O., farmer, 18 
Stevens St., North Andover. 

Clark, Milford 11., Jr., assistant 
city forester, City Hall, Buffalo,N.Y. 

Cutter, Frederick A., forester, 40 
Elm Street, Orange, N. J. 



hotel Olarrcn 

South Deerfield, Mass, 

T. J. AHERN, MANAGER 



OVER 65 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 




Trade Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights Ac. 
Anyone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
invention ts probably patentable. Communlm- 
ttoniatrictlyconDdei.ua]. HANDBOOK on Patent* 
sent f rne. Oldest auency for securing patents. 

Patent* taken through Muun a Co. receive 
tptcutl notice, without charge, in the 

Scientific American. 

A handsomely Illustrated weekly. T-arirest- «lf- 
rulatton of any scientific Journal, Terms, 93 a 
year: four months, tl. Bold by ail newndealers. 

MUNNtCo^ B -"» Hew York 

Branch Office, SK I* BU Washington, D. C 



i Batchelder & Snyder Co. 

PACKERS, POFLTKY OKKSSKKS 
AMD BUTTKK M.tKKItv 

WHOLESALE DEALERS IK 

cf. Mutton, Lamb, Veal, Pork, Lard, Ham.v 
Bacon, Sausages. Poultry, (lame, Butter 
Cheese. Eggs, Bean*. 

| itfice & Store* UoJ. 57,59. >t & "3 Blackstone St. 

li.iston Packing House, Brighton, Mass. 

Native Poultry Dressing Plant, Boston. 

Creameries in Vermont. 



61 LAVAL 

Cream Separators 

Make Fall and Winter 
Dairying More Profitable 

THERE Arc special advantages in using a 
good cream separator daring the fall 
and winter months. 
The milk Iron cows long In lactation is 
hardest to cream— and likewise hardest to 
separate with an inferior separator. 

Moreover, cream and butter prices are 
highest, so that the waste nf gravity setting 
or a poor separator counts for most. 

Then thete's the sweet, warm skim-milk for 
stock feeding, alone worth the cost of a sepa- 
rator In cold weather. 

There Is surely no reason to delay the pur- 
chase of a separator or to continue the use nl 
an inferior one. 

Vou can't afford to 
wait until next spring. 
Let the Dc Laval start 
saving cream for you 
right now and It will 
earn its cost by spring. 
See the nearest 
De Laval agent at 
once, or if you do 
not know him, write 
us direct for any de- 
sired information. 



for our existence, for Our iwuw, • <" ah ire»u»«,u ".. ...»,.... ... B . ,. ^ - mj v us direct lor any (e- 

our all. Responsibility fur the war try out as candidates for -Anutai nl | ""IlJr^% sired information. 

Moni E-» - -> - SSSSSi JKS nK §he de urn separator co. 

to the jingoes* of r ranee (witness ^ hefore the first of Novembe ■f-s Broadway *>F. Madison St. 

_ - _.*i»i ..# ii.. ... ... .. _ _ j_«_i*_ * . /■■>...<.. .. 



the inflammatory articles of the 
**Novoe Vremya" and the ••Matin") 
"England has done her part toward 



After that time a definite system of] 
work will be assigned to the can- 
didate!, 



so F. Madison St. 

CHICAGO 



Dickinson, Walter K., mailing 
address, North Amherst. 

Kastman, Jasper F., teacher, State 
School of Agriculture, Morrisville, 
N. V. 

Hartford, Archie A., teacher. High 
School, Lewiston, Me. 

Higgins, Arthur \V\, florist, West- 
field. 

King, Clinton, lawyer, SI Kim 
Street, Springfield. 

Livers, (Miss) Susie D,, editorial 
assistant, 2D Beacon Street, liostou. 

Parker, Charles M., fanner, South 
Warren, Brookfield post office. 

Peters, Fred C, forester, Box 
546, Ardmore, Pa. 

Shaw, Edward H., market garden- 
er, 27. r » Washington St., Belmont. 

Summers, John N., entomologist, 
Gypsy Moth Laboratory, Melrose 
Highlands. 

Thompson, Clifford B., plantation 
superintendaut, Selama IVrak, Fed- 
erated Malay States. 

Walker, James H., city foretter, 
City Hall, Newark, N. .1. 

Watkins. Fred A., farmer, Weil 
Milhury. 

Watts, Ralph J., secretary of M. 
A. C, Amherst. 

Wood, Herbert P., entomologist. 
Box 208, Dallas. 1Y\. 



ALUMNI NOTES 
'07.— J.Gerry Curtis, address 2 401 
Farmers' Bank Building, Pittsburg, 
Pa., is now engaged in forestry »■><! 
landscape designing and is with the 
Borough Forester of Sewickley, Wil- 
kinshurgh and Dormont. 

*0H. — A daughter was horn to Mi. 
and Mrs. William F. Sawyer, at 
Worcester, on Oct. Kith. Mrs. Saw- 
yer failed to rally and died shortly 
after of acute dilation of the heart. 

'Oh, — Thomas II. Jones formerly 
connected with the Sugar Planters 
station in Porto Rico, now with the 
United States Deposit of Kutomology 
has donated a fine collection of insects 
to the college. 

'l.'L — Charles A. Oertcl was mar- 
ried to Miss Elsie Rich at Springfield 
on Wednesday, Oct. 14. The couple 
will be at home after Jan. 1, 1916 at 
Homecroft, North Hanson. 

'14. — F. Eugene Marsh was mar- 
ried last Tuesday evening to Miss 
Sol ma Soline of Worcester, at that 
city. The happv couple left the next 
day for East Longmeadow, where 
Marsh has a \m«: ' position as farm- 
manager on a large estate. Clark 
Thayer '18 oamc on from Cornell 
university to play the wedding- 
march. The couple received many 
handsome presents. 

*14» — David A. Coleman has re- 
ceived an appointment to a fellowship 
in soil fertility and agronomy at the 
New Jeraery Agricultural Experi- 
ment station under Dr. J. G. Lip- 
man, the well known authority on 
soil bacteriology. Address, 95 Bay* 
ard Street, New Brunswick, N. J. 



Che Pbeasant 

amttE St., Bmbewt 

Breakfast, Luncheon, 
Afternoon Tea. 

Dinner if arranged for. 
Telephone 470 

Rooms for Transients, 



theTeachers Exchange 




An Especially Oood Commission Proposition— 

Cash for test orders— Article widely Advertised— 
Cuts down expense in po\»i'i 1 I. mh- Address 
Eni.INBKKINi. M rri \ Co., 113a N. gtli street, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



Of Boston 



1 jo Boy I tt on St. 



Recommends Teachers, Tutors md Schools 



* They're not short-lived 

The Jerseys 

In 1913 elfWeen Jersey 
Cows were olticia.ly tested 
which avcrafi! d 12 years 
a:id 7 months ol are. Their 
a /crape milk production 
\ is Si 7 poinds. Average 
batUr I t, Sflf pounds. One 
of tH. c cows was over 18 
years old. 

Longevity, Cnm'titu**on ->■"* Ecmwmtc 
Production arc Jer»^yc,ut .. I'listuj. 

I HI AMHtirAN JEMSEY Ol II 1 CLUB 

324 W. iW St.. New York < ay 







MGgRFS'ii 



NON-LEAK ABLE 



FOUNTAIN PEN 



^f I I l^*^ Minimize your fountain pen 
f V ^^^ troubles by owning a Moore's, ft It Is the 
^J ^^ safest, soundest and most dependable pen known. 
r ^ its strength lies In its very simplicity. Nothing 
finiky to get out of order, ft You can give your- 
self no better treat than a Moore's Non-leakable. / 

For Sale by Dealer* Everywhere 

American Fountain Pen Company 

Adama, Cushinft ft Foster, Selling Agent* 
168 DEVONSHIRE STREET :: « BOSTON, MASS. 




EL Frank Coe Fertilizers 



1857 



THE BUSINESS FARMERS' STANDARD * Ql^ 
FOR OVER FIFTY-FIVE YEARS 1914 



Do You Raise 300 Bushels of Potatoes per Acre? 

HREE hundred bushels per acre is 
not an unusual yield by any means, 
but did you get it this year ? 
Cg If you were planning to raise 300 
bushels of potatoes to the acre how 
24 far apart would you space your rows? 




How far apart would you drop the seed pieces in 
the row ? 

<][How much fertilizer would you use to grow 300 
bushels of potatoes per acre? How would you 
apply it ? 

(fAre you sure that your seed potatoes are true to 
name and time to type ? 

IJWhat are you doing to prevent "scab," and early 
and late blight ? 

flDid you have a short crop of {potatoes because of 
dry weather ? Have you decided how you will 
.overcome this trouble in the future ? 

•JAII these practical point*, and many more, are fully covered ain our 
new book 

"Potatoes: A Money Crop" 

which will be ml free to every potato grower who reqeeau s easy, and 

mention* this paper. 

IJThis book is written by a min wbo himtclf hu bed yeers of experience at 

■ potato grower, and who has msde ■ careful tludy of the best methods of 

other growers, 

«Jlf vou read this book you will keep it for future reference. It is a "worth 

while" puhlieaiion. 

The Coe-Mortimer Company 

SI CHAMBERS STREET, NEW YORK CITY 







1 

1 



8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Oct. 27, 1914- 



- JOIN THE BUNCH AT- 
EPSTEIN'S TAILORING PARLORS 

NilM li>c.iti-<l over post utlice. Up OM flight 

Pressing and Cleaning a Specialty 

Liberal Ticket System T«L j6M 

T. £tf IE2NTKA. 

SHOE STORE 

Shoes Repaired by Machinery 

SHOE SHINE 

Open .Sunday from 7-12. On your w.iy to P.O. 

The Highland Hotel 

Corner of Hillman and Barnes Sttt-et>, linen 
blocks from the Union Depot, i»» modern ho»- 

telry run on the European Kbw. It [■ I"" 1 | f I' 
from Main Street, away irom the in. iw and dust 
and yet in the center of the business district. 

Its roomi are well furnished and comfortable, 
having a telephone and hot and cold running 
water in every room. Prices SSI and up; rooms 
with bath (single) SI. SO and 11 

ItsexiHllent cuisine and well ventilated dining 
room makes a meal a pleasant memory-evei v 
thinij of the highest quality, well cooked and 
served in the best possible manner. 

SU? at the Highland Hotel once ami \ou will 
anticipate staying th.-re again. MBtk WtJ 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College fountain pens 



Offers courses of instruction in twenty eight teaching- 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialise in the following subjects : 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 

Agricultural Economics 

Rural Sociology 

Economic Entomology 

Microbiology 

Plant* Physiology and Pathology 

Agricultural Education 

Rural Social Sciem e 



Floriculture 

Forestry 

Eandscape Gardening 

Pomology 

Agricultural Chemistry 



Moore's Swan's 

Waterman's 

Thirty-six dozen pens to select from. 

OUR RULE 

"Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded." 



evening- 



D. H. SIEVERS, 



Hifrhtnnd Hot* I 



-!>• login 1-1. HsMi 



STIBERT rHllllTllE 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New Kn 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 

E. D. MARSH ESTATE 



For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



Joint Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics, 
M. A. C. Athletic Fif'-i Association, 
The College Senate, 
Football Association, 

Baseball Association. 
Track Association. 
Hotkey Association. 
Tennis Association. 
Rifle dob, 



Philip H. Smith, Secretary 

C. s. Hi.ks. Treasurer 

E. Towns, Piesident 

.1. A. Price, manager 

S. Prouty, .Manager 

E. F. Clark, Manager 

B. s. Draper, Manager 

H. Bishop, Manager 

B. M. Upton, President 



1. -1 ai.i .iwih. inoa 

Stki'iikn Lank Fol.qssb 

MANHPAinUSINO JKWKl-KR 

1 81) liKOAD W A V. N K W YOB K 

CI.LTIl AND C'Or^I.IOUK 

l-INS ANU KINCJS ** 

OOLD, HII.VHK AND HHON5EM VMOAI.N 



.1 F. Nicholson, Producing sndBoeiness Manager 

lioister LKnsteib y A Alu | L , l8Ull , Manager 

Musical Association. M, Rogers, Manager 

Nineteen Hundred Fifteen Index, L K Fta3C Manager 

Nineteen Hundred Sixteen Index. H H Wl2J FrSlSnl 

M. A. C. Chr.Miau Association, » • H President 

M. A. ( . Catholic 1 tab, f w HnAL president 

Fraternity Conference, ,, w l.it i..«>i *•, Piesident 

Btockbridge Club, 




EAHAE'S INN 

Northampton, Maaaachusetta 

tw<. itecaa raoa tnt d*>oi 

The hotel where there is comfort (with 

out extravagance.) More popular 

than ever. 

Special Luncheon 12—2 P. M. 

PRIVATE OININC ROOMS 

A la Carte Service 
Prom 6 30 to 1 1 P. M. 



COX SONS 

— AND — 

VINING 

71-74 Madison Avenue. New York 

CAPS AND GOWNS 

I Jest Materials and Workmanship 

WOODWARD'S 



l befl are s„v*n Good Reasons wliv voushoitld 

lm\ vonr 



COAL 

or 

C. E. ELDER 




17 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst vi.i Northampton, 
through the Haitields. past the foot 
,,! Sugar Loaf Mt., alongside the 
famoua Bloody Brook battle ground 
to Old Deerfield, thence to Green- 
field. Turners Fall* and across the 
••Plains" to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millen Fall*. 

50 Mile* of Trackage -flodern 
Equipment -Train Dispatch- 
ing System -Freight and Ea- 
- press Service over entire line. 

TT ASTTNGS Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
a ~1 Cimpany 

Newsdealer. r ' 



Stationery, i Newspapers, 
Magazines and Col- 
lege. Supplies 

A. J. 



CARS 

Leave AOOIE COLLEGE lor HOL- 
YOKE at 15 min. past the hour. 

CARS 

Leave AMHERST far AOQIE COL- 
LEOE at 7 ami 37 min. past the hour. 

SpccM Car* at Heaaonable Kataa 



ICE CREAM, 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

JNIFORMS 

For college and military ichools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

JACOB REED'S SONS, 



Makers of a Gold Medal Uniforms. 



c*»w miy frm r A. M. *4 A.mA 1^.1426 Chestnut St., 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



MKHERST i SUNOtRLAND SI. ft CO- 



For a Daily and Sunday Newspaper] 
You should Read 

i i • • 

Springfield Republi 

While you are at college in Amherst, 

II MM *U »r Th* H . A. C. Hewa 

Thi" !*«•■* M|M»rtlBB; JUrVS 

full Cirll»»r»l B*»i 

A strong Killtorlal |->«k«- 

liitrrrsMng rt-atur** 

It li ft Re»l »»w«pft|i«* 

Daily, 3 cents; 70 cents a month ; *§•« 
a quarter, 

Sunday, 5 cents 5 50 cents a quarter. 
Subset it*- fey «*»*< « thfj^h t*» An&ent Ni 





NOV -1914 

_ tX>lityti 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXV. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, November 3, 1914. 



No. 8 



DEATH OF DEAN MILLS 

A LOSS TO COLLEGE 

Recent Loss of Wife and a Severe In- 
jury Hasten Decease of Dean 

Emeritus. 

By the recent death of Professor 
(ieorge F. Mills, dean emeritus of 
the college, the institution is bereft of 
oue of its oldest and most loyal 
friends, whose loss will be felt hy all 
who knew him. 

Due to ill health Dean Mills was 
uot able to attend to his duties at the 
Dean's office with his accustomed 
regularity during the last year and 
for that reason was not as well known 
to the younger men at the college as 
to the upperclasameD. 

To all who knew him, Dean Mills 
was an inspiring example of a Chris- 
tian gentleman, at all times and un- 
der all conditions, no matter how ad- 
verse. He was a gentleman of the 
old school and in all his dealings was 
courteous and kindly. t*'»f a- ex* 
ample of a quiet steadfast percever- 
ance and belief in his Maker and His 
will Dean Kmeritus Mills will long 
be remembered at this college. 



COUHTRY LIFE CLUB 
About 20 students attended the 
first meeting this year of the " Col- 
legiate Country Life Club of Amer- 
ica," held in the President's office 
last Wednesday evening. President 
Itutterlield, who is the national presi- 
dent of this club, spoke concerning 
its work. In his talk he said that 
the objects of the organization were 
to study the conditions of countrj 
life so that men might fit themselves 
for leadership In rural institutions, 
also to promote the development of 
agriculture in its three distinctive 
aspects, namely, as an industry, as a 
business, and as a mode of Uving. 
After the president's talk a committee 
of four was chosen to amend the by- 
laws of the constitution, and to take 
charge of the work of forming other 
bapters of the "Collegiate Country 
Life Club of America," throughout 
New England, The elections for 
various officers are to be held at the 
next meeting. The "Country Life 
flub" is to meet every other Thurs- 
day evening at 7-80 o'clock in the 
^•it'ial Union room, after the Y. M, 
' '. A. meeting. 



HON. EDMUND MORTIMER 

APPOINTED TRUSTEE 



Governor Walsh Fills Vacancy of 

Charles Ward by Promi- 

nent Agriculturalist 



HENRY WALLACE SPEAKS ON GOAL FROM TOUCHDOWN 



00.— Clayton E. Risley, address, 
The Plant Pouse7 Hsndlten, W. Y. 



On Wednesday, Oct. 21, Governor 
Walsh appointed State Councilor 
Mortimer a trustee of M. A. C. to fill 
the vacancy left by Charles Ward of 
Buckland, whose term expired this 
year. The executive council con- 
firmed the appointment under sus- 
pension of rules. 

Mr. Mortimer was born in Chicago 
in 1876 but was raised and educated 
in Maine. When only sixteen years 
old he went to sea for about two 
years, making a voyage on a sailing 
ship to China and return. Starting 
as an ordinary seaman, he returned 
as second mate. As both the cap- 
tain and fust mate had been injured 
in a storm, it was his task to bring 
the ship into port, no small task for 
a youth of eighteen. He then 
worked for W. R. Grace & Co. of 
New York, a South American import- 
ing house, where he soon climbed up 
to an important position. Mr. Mor- 
timer was the first roan to start the 
present use of guano as a fertilizer. 

In 1901 he opened up a fertilizer 
business for himself with offices in 
New York and Charleston. This 
was first the Edmund Mortimer Co. 
and later, after combining with the 
Coe Co., it was known as the Coe- 
Mortimer Co. 

Mr. Mortimer is a member of Un- 
orders of Masons and Knights Tem- 
plar and director of Massachusetts 
Fruit Growers* association. He was 
selectman of Grafton for three years, 
serving for one year as chairman of 
the board. Last year he was elected 
to the executive council of Massa- 
chusetts and .has done excellent ser- 
vice in that capacity. Governor 
Walsh and he have been life-long 
friends. 

Councilor Mortimer is extremely 
interested in all phases of agriculture. 
He owns, probably, the largest peach 
orchards in this state, having about 
16,000 trees at Graf ton and 18,000 
at Bolton. These are both young 
orchards and the first big crop Is ex- 
pected next year. At Grafton he 
raises about 200 tons of choice hay 
each year as well as many potatoes 
and apples. He prefers mules to 
horses, having but one pair of horses 
on the farm and three pairs of mules. 



LEADERSHIP AT ASSEMBLY 

Love for Mankind and an Alert Mind 

are Essential to Good 

Leadership. 

Henry Wallace in his own original, 
familiar way presented his ideas of 
leadership at assembly iu the chapel 
on Wednesday. Mr. Wallace is a 
man of varied experience who first 
prepared for and entered the minis- 
try, but later became an editor of 
agricultural papers. President But- 
terfleld while introducing him sug- 
gested that he might present him as 
a member of the Country Life Com- 
mission, a recipient of academic hon- 
ors, a friend to farmers or a councilor 
of the public. He preferred how- 
ever to introduce him as "Uncle 
Henry" as so many of his friends 
knew him. The idea that the 
speaker emphasized as the essential 
of leadership was a love for man. 
la u\o iwtnarku Le t-uju . 



WINS GAME FOR TUFTS 

Aggie Score in First Period Makes 

Victory Seem Certain. Tufts 

Wins in Last Three Minutes. 

The football team presented a 
wonderful defense iu its game against 
Tufts at the Tuft's Oval Saturday. 
With practically the entire student 
body at hand, and in the presence of 
over 1800 alumni and spectators, 
the team was just cheated out of a 
victory in the last minute of play, 
the final score being 7-6. Dole's 
line-breaking and tackling for losses, 
coupled with Palmer's kicking were 
the features of the game. The 
eleven men on the team worked as a 
unit. This accounts for the wonder- 
ful fight. Tufts* much heralded for- 
ward passes were readily broken up 
with one exception out of 16 at- 
tempts. Four times was Tufts held 
for downs within the five yard line 



, 1 



■ . *l 



r . ♦!•.. Of) 



"We would not be comfortable 
here without being in sympathy with 
the professors and the men in col- 
lege. To be a leader you must be in 
sympathy with the Power of the 
world. If you wish to lead you 
must get your trolley on the line 
with the power house. 

"Leaders must love folks, their 
fellow men. A man cannot lead 
unless the followers have confidence 
in him, for love begets love, hate 
begets hate and suspicion begets 
suspicion. 

"1 hate to bear Americans speaking 
of 'Dagos' and • Pollacks*. It is only 
a question of time when these people 
whom aristocracy laughs at and cap- 
italist! use for their own ends will 
own the state and Yankees will be 
as dead as "Dodo." If we are to 
lead we must study and like men. 
We may drive men but it is easier to 
lead those worthy of leadership. 
The world will not long remember 
the men who make money but it will 
remember those who give their lives 
for men. 

"We are here to fit for leadership 
but that will not make us leaders. 
Therefore get hold of yourselves, 
your body and your mind that it may 
act under your control. Now is the 
time to begin to get your mind work- 
ing. Be thoroughly awake. 

"This generation has bigger 
problems than the test. The world 



[CootinuadOB 



Si 



The M. A. C. score came toward 
the close of the first half. Palmer 
punted the ball, Parks receiving on 
his own 20 yard line. After Hadley 
had just made seven yards on a skin 
tackle play, Richardson, the Tuft«' 
center, shot the ball over Westoott's 
head. Danforth dove for the ball 
and carried it across the line for a 
touchdown. Palmer missed the goal. 

The Tufts score came within a 
minute of the end of the game. 
After M. A. C. had held for two 
downs within the five yard line, 
Westcott pushed the ball across on a 
line plunge. Parks kicked the goal 
for the deciding point. 
The game by periods : 

i 11- 1 • .1 \i: 1 1 i: 

Tufts won the toss and chose to 
receive, M. A. C. kicking against 
the wind. Palmer kicked and Gray- 
son made the first tackle downing 
Parks on his own. 80 yard line. 
Tufts made first down on three plays. 
Aggie was penalized for offside play, 
however the team held and Parks 
was forced to kick, the ball going 
off side at the Massachusetts IS 
yard line. Two rushes were made 
and then Palmer punted. Twice fee 
home team made first down, bringing 
the ball up to the 25 yard line. 
Here an attempted drop kick failed 
by a wide margin. Cnrran was re- 
placed by Cotton at this point, be- 
cause of injuries with which he 
entered the game. After a couple 
of rushes and then a five yard pen- 






The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 3, 19 14. 



alty, Palmer punted, Parka receiv- 
ing. Hadley made a 20 yard run 
around right eud. Angell gained 
four yards. Fuller replaced Cotton 
at left tackle. Twice Fuller dove 
over the Tufts' line tackling the man 
with the ball for losses. Plaisted 
broke up a forward pass and the ball 
went to M. A. C. According to the 
regular procedure Palmer kicked 
after a couple of rushes. Westcott 
now entered the game and in the first 
play carried the ball for 12 yards. 
Subsequently he was held without 
gain. The first quarter ended with 
the ball in Tufts' possession on the 
Massachusetts' 40 yard line. 

MKCOND VLAKTEK. 

After a couple of rushes resulting in 
no gain Parks punted the ball across 
the line for a touchback. The ball 
was put into play on the M. A. C. 
20 yard line. Palmer immediately 
punted the ball to the Tufts' 15 
yard line from whence it rolled over 
the line for a touchback. A couple of 
punts were exchanged, Palmer easily 
outdistancing his rival. Palmer tried 
a place kick but failed. Westcott's 
line plunging and off tackle plays 
netted two first downs when Aggie 
again held for downs. Punts were 
exchanged. Perry tackled Parks 
after the latter had signaled for a 
fair catch and Aggie was penalized 
15 yards. Tufts made first down 
and on the next play was penalized 
15 yards for holding. Two long for- 
ward passes were broken up and Hay 
States' sons received the oall in the 
center of the field. Palmer punted 
Hadley gaiued seven yards around 
right end. Richardson shot the ball 
over Parks' head. Danforth dove 
for the ball and carried it across for 
a touchdown. Palmer failed to kick 
the goal. Tufts kicked off to Dar- 
liug and Palmer punted. Darling 
intercepted a long forward on his 
own 25 yard line and the half ended. 

TIIIKP QUARTER. 

Tufts kicked off and (jrayson ran 
the ball back to the 35 yard line. 
Palmer punted. Tufts made four 
first downs and then the Aggie team 
held and the ball went to M. A. C. 
Palmer {ranted and Parks, who re- 
ceived, was downed in his tracks by 
Day. Three first downs were again 
made by Tufts and then the Aggie 
team broke up a couple of forward 
passes and once more held for downs 
within the five yard line. Palmer 
immediately punted and the quarter 
ended with the ball in Tufts posses- 
sion in the center of the field. 

i "i Kill QUARTKK. 

Angell made first down around 
right end, bat Aggie held again and 
Parka was forced to pant. After 
making nine yards in tbree rashes, 
Palmer kicked the ball to the center 
of the field. Tufts made two first 
downs. Dote was seriously hart and 
replaced by Verbeck. Again the 
Tufts backs gained their ground for 
a first down. With the ball on Ag- 



gie's four yard line, they fumbled. 
Whorf recovered the ball, but Palmer 
kicked out of bounds at the 30 
yard line. Dole returned to the 
game. This time the sweep of the 
Tuft's backfield was irresistible and 
with the help of a couple of fresh 
linemen, forced the ball across for a 
touchdown. Parks kicked the goal 
practically ending the game. 

The playing was hard and fast 
throughout and much time was taken 
out for injured men. 

The lineup : 

TUFTS. M. A. C. 

S tankard, le re, Day 

O'Donnell, 
Murphy, 

Tobin, 

Schlotterbeck 

Brown, 

Richardson, c 

Thorndyke, rg lg, Danforth 

Curran 
Bingham, rt It, \ Cotton 



Bennett, I 
Nellis, J re 

Parks, qb 

Hadley, Ihb 



I" 



J'e 



rt, Plaisted 

rg ' I Verbeck 

{ Dole 
' J Perry 



Fuller 

le, Grayson 

qb, Melican (captain) 
rhb, Darling 



[rhb 



Ihb, Palmer 
fb, Whorf 



Westcott, 
Turner, ( - 
Angell, J tb 

Score— Tufts 7, M. A. C. 6. Touch- 
downs— Danforth, Westcott. Goal from 
touchdown — Parks. Umpire — F. Hoey. 
Referee— J. McGrath, Boston College. 
Head linesman— Green, Harvard. Time 
— Four 12-minute periods. 



INTER-CLASS RIFLE MATCH 

During the last few weeks, prac- 
tice for the indoor rifle team has 
been going on in the range behind 
the drill hall. Soon after the call for 
candidates was issued, about 70 men 
reported to Captain Lane and al- 
ready the process of moulding 
another championship team is well 
under way. A fair proportion of men 
from each of the four classes, with 
the possible exception of the Sopho- 
mores, are now working out every 
ilay. More men, however, are needed. 
Last year three out of ten highest 
men graduated, thus leaving pros- 
pects for this year's team very bright. 
The trouble is, however, that five of 
the remaining seven will graduate 
next spring, giving the outlook for 
1915-16 a dark aspect. The men 
who come out this year, even if they 
do not make the Varsity, will receive 
valuable practice and will become 
accustomed to the range so that next 
year they will be the more available 
for Varsity material. 

In order to stimulate interest in 
rifle shooting at this college, Captain 
I .mm- has conceived the idea of hav- 
ing an annual inter-class shooting 
match between teams from the two 
lower classes, this match to be a 
regular inter-class contest. The plan 
as worked out by Captain Lane and 
passed by the Senate is as follows 1 

1, An annual indoor rifle match 
between the Sopomores and Fresh- 
man shall be established at M. A, C. 
for the promotion of college rifle 
shooting and incidentally to co-oper- 



ate with the Military Department 
and the Rifle Club in teaching the 
students how to shoot. 

2. As a reward of merit, numer- 
als shall be given to the five highest 
men and the manager of the winning 
team. 

3. Rules : 

(a) Each class shall elect a 
a manager who shall : 

(1) be responsible for the use 
of ammunition, targets, 
and for the cleaning of 
guns. 

(2) Keep a record of each 
man's shooting. 

(3) Pick the twelve best men 
for the team with the aid 
of the coaches, on or be- 
fore Nov. 15. 

(b) Each class shall be repre- 
sented by a team of ten men 
and two substitutes. 

(c) The score of all ten men 
to count in the match. 

(d) The match shall come off 
between Nov. 15th and the 
Thanksgiving recess. 

(e) Sergeant Lee and the Cap- 
tain of the Varsity shall act 
as coaches and shall have a 
deciding influence in picking 
the best men for the teams. 

(f) The coaches shall also 



fj FOB YOUR DEN /j 

U Beautiful College Pennants V 
YALE and HARVARD, 

Each 9 in, x 24 in. 

PRINCETON, CORNELL, 
MICHIGAN, 

Each 7 in. x 21 in. 

4— Pennants, Size 12 x 30—4 

Any Leading Colleges of 

Your Selection 

All of our best quality, in their 
proper colors, with colored emblems. 

Either assortment, for limited time, 
sent postpaid for 50 cents and five 
stamps to cover shipping costs. 

Write us for prices before placing 
orders for felt novelties of all kinds. 

The (iem City Novelty Co., 

402 Bittner Street, 
Dayton, - - Ohio. 



FOR GOOD "EATS" 



86 PLEASANT ST. 



Mrs. J. K. W. Davenport 



You win $500 j 

by writing the best 

Fatima ad. 

We believe the College Man who smokes 
Fatima ought to be able to write a good 
Fatima ad. He knows from experience 
that Fatima is of satisfying excellence 
—that for its superlative quality it to 
moderately priced. He of all Fatima 
smokers, should be able to write of 
Fatima convincingly. 

So weare going to pay $.500 to the student 
who prepares and sends to as the best 
original advertisement for Fatima Ciga- 
rettes before June 1, 1915. 




4TwnT 



There are no restrictions, whatever, no strings of any F«a» » Qpwi 
kind on this offer, other than this— every contestant T^-ftJES*?! 
must be a regularly ao relied student in an American 
College. We want a student— not a p rofessional ad 
writer— to benefit from this offer. 
Three prominent business men, whose names will be 
' later, will act as judges. 



$5 for every ad 
$500 for the beat one submitted 



The tew will be awarded J ne 1, 
IBIS. In the meantime, nohw of the 
ads ■nbtnitted will be published 
eae ti mont h 1 n college puliliration*. 
tdfether « 1 1 h t ho na me a nd phot o- 
§rap!i of the writer— provided the 
writer will give perwi.ision for 
such publication. 

For each ad no paMlsbed we will 
par the writer Is. But, thepubli 
cation of any ad mint not he taken 
to liitiiifv t hat it Rtandn an r better 
cham i- to win the ISM than lae 
adi that arc not published. 



Tker 



Tho«.e who try to earn this 
pet should remember that 
the supreme tent of anr advertise- 
ment is its fllinf poirrr. Whether 
roar ad comtmtii of only tea 
— or runs to m Uinusnntl — it sh ould 
be inierextinir, truthful, convinc- 
Ini— It should five to the reader 
the bojrltif Impulse. To write 
•■eh advertiaesMBts. that 
will peas the test of tier 
miim-f. the writer saast b 
lieveln the product he la 
writing about. 




$ Sr 3* jK f *U%4 m mc 0m. %\% Fifth Ave... New York 





The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 3, 19 14. 



have the privilege of limiting 
the number of men on the 
range and the number of rounds 
they may fire. 
(g) Practicing for the match 
shall be done under the rules 
governing the Varsity practice, 
(h) No man who was one of 
the first ten men of last year's 
team shall be allowed to com- 
pete on either team, 
(j) Each team shall elect its 
own captain after Nov. 15, 
The importance of this inter-class 
match must not be underestimated 
as it will not only train men for the 
Varsity, but it will get men interested 
in shooting who formerly thought they 
had no ability. During the last few 
years, intercollegiate shooting has 
been given tremendous impetus by 
the National Rifle Association. Last 
year there were three classes of 
twelve teams each and this year a 
whole new class has been formed. 
Aggie has been in the first class since 
1907, when she entered her first team 
for the intercollegiate title. Since 
then she has never stood lower than 
second place and she has held the 
championship more times than all the 
other colleges put together. In reality 
the rifle team has done and is doing 
more to advertise this college than 
anv other of the teams and, therefore, 
it needs the unqualified support of 
every student. After Thanksgiving 
a cut will be made in the Varsity 
squad, irot even so it is planned to 
have the range open one night a 
week for the benefit of those who are 
not on the squad. 

FRESHMEN TIE MUNSON 

Playing the best game that they 
have shown this year, the 1918 foot- 
ball team succeeded in tying the 
strong Munson eleven at that town 
Saturday with a score of 7-7. The 
freshmen team brought into play 
some of the new football that they 
have used against the varsity in the 
scrimmages, while the Monson team 
presented a well rounded attack and 
showed good team work. Chambers 
scored the touchdown for M . A < 
and also kicked the goal. Cande 
played a star game for the home 
team and scored their one touchdown. 

The summary : 
m. a. c. 1918. 
Minor, Lipshires, re 



PROF. SPRAGUE SPEAKS 

Professor Sprague at his weekly 
"War Talk" in the chapel last Wed- 
nesday evening spoke on "Captures, 
Privateers and Blockades". The fol- 
lowing facts were gathered from his 
lecture. 

The usual method of procedure in 
a capture as proscribed by inter- 
national law is to fire a blank car- 
tridge at the suspected ship. If no 
heed is taken of this by the suspect 
a shot is fired across the bows and 
finally if necessary she is fired at. 
When the vessel is stopped she is 
boarded and her papers inspected. 
If these show her to be the ship of a 
neutral she is allowed to proceed, 
otherwise she becomes a legal prize. 
The lawful method is to next send her 
to a home port but as this is often 
difficult her crew is taken off and she 
is sunk. If she reaches port she is 
turned over to a prize court that 
decides for their nation if she is a 
legal prize ; when this is the case she 
is sold at auction to any one inter- 
ested. But if there is doubt the mat- 
ter may be referred to an international 
court. 

Privateers are private vessels fitted 
out with the permission of the gov- 
ernment to prey upon the commerce 
of a belligerent. These have gradu- 
ally passed out of existence as large 
navies have made them unnecessaiy. 
A famous example of tins class was 
the Alabama built and fitted in Eng- 
land to prey upon the noi them com- 
merce in the war of the Rebellion. 

Blockades consist of preventing 
commerce entering an enemy's ports. 
There are three kinds of blockades. 
The pacific blockade is used to main- 
tain the peace. The paper blockade 
is merely a declaration of blockade 
used when there are not available 
ships to close the ports and it serves 
only to confuse neutrals. The real 
blockade consists of closing the port 
in question by placing waj ships out 
side the harbor. 



DR. R. C. 

Dentist 

NASH'S BLOCK 
Evenings hy Appointment. 



LABROVITZ 

Tailor and Pkbsser. 

Gents' Furnishings— Dress Suits to 
Rent— Drill Uloves and Collars 

TlCKBT SVSTKM. 
11 Ainll.vSI. I 'I »« .1 »«« 



High Grade Furnishings 

Travel the country over and you'll not 
find a choicer or a better line of Men's 
Toggery than you'll find right here. 

The best shirt makers, underwear 
makers, scarf makers and glove 
makers send us these productions. 

The Best in Every Line 
is Here. 

Then again, we are not high priced. 
All the patrons of this store know 
this to be a fact. Test us and see. 

See our new Manhattan and Monarch 
Shirts, $1.50 to $2.50. 

Look at our Gloves, $1.00 to $2.50. 

See our Neckwear, 25c to $1.50. 
'© A. B. K . Co.; 1*14 

Two Hundred Mackinaws Now Ready for Your Inspection. 



Holmes, rt 
Roberta, rg 
Tilton, c 
Carter, lg 
Sullivan, It 
McKee.le 
Chambers, qb 
Grayson, rhb 
Hawley, Ihb 
Burtch, fb 
Referee— S. Faulkner 



MoNSOS 

le, Squires 

It, Cain 

lg, Millard 

c, Burrill 

rg, Allen, Amy 

rt, Fushey 

re, C'olgre ve 

qb, Gillett 

Ihb, Inglehart 

rhb, Harper 

fb, Cande 

of Monson. 



> i nesmsn — Warren. 
ner of Monson. 

larters. 



Timer— C. Faulk- 
Time— la minute 



THE TURKISH BLEND CIGARETTE i 



'07.— Joseph O. Chapman is land- 
scape gardener in charge of private 
grounds, North Andovei . 



BOYS' CLUB CLASSES 

Boys* Clnb work has been com- 
menced with real vigor, the first 
classes in the subject being under the 
supervision of Harold M Gore. A 
class will be held in the physical di- 
rector's office each Wednesday even- 
ing, and at least once a week the 
novices will be given actual practise 
in the manner of conducting a club. 
The course of instruction will include 
theory of work, and the practical 
application of theory. Detailed at- 
tention will be given to juvenile games 
and methods of teaching them, the 
elements of discipline, first aid to the 
injured etc. 

About 20 men have signified ac- 
tive interest, and present prospects 
indicate that the work will be more 
successful this year than ever before. 



'14, — Murray D. Lincoln, address, 
No. 8S Shctiicket St., Norwich. 
Conn. 




SANDERSON & THOMPSON 

Amhorat 



! 

Twenty-five cents will be put in a box for tbe 
NEW ATHLETIC FIELD every time you 
buy sboes at our store costing $3.50 or over. 

VERY LATEST STYLES. 

Shoes for the Drill- $2.50 to $5.00 

Paee's Shoe Store 



School and College Photographers . . . 




LOO ALLY: 5 a Center St., Northampton, Mass., 

and South Hadley, Mast. 

Main Office: These Studios offer the best skilled 

1546-154! Broadway, artists ind most complete 

New York City equipment obtainable 



JACKSON & CUTLEB 



■DEALERS IN- 









Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 




I 

I 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 3^9H- 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 3, 1914. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS 

FRANK W. BUELL '15, Edltor - in ^ f 

TYLER S. ROGERS '16. Managing Editor 

HENRY H. WHITE 'IS, Assistant Editor 

JAM ES A. PRICE 't S . Athletic Ed, or 

E SUMNER DRAPER '.5, Athlet.c Editor 
THOS.L. HARROCKS '16, Department Editor 

ALFRED A. GIOIOSAM6, Campus Editor 

FRANK A. SCHEUFELE, Alumni Editor 

MILFORD R. LAWRENCE '.7. 

Associate Editor 

RICHARD W. SMITH '17, Associate Editor 

BUSINESS DEPARTMSWT 

MAURICE J. CLOUGH '15, Business Manager 
CHAS A. HUNTINGTON, JR. '16. 

Assistant Business Manager 
W RICHARD SEARS '15. Advertising Man'gT 
LESTER E. FIELDINC16, Ass't Adv. Mgt. 
BIRGER R. ROSEQUIST'i7. Circulation 



endurable, but the circular window 
back of the pulpit is nothing but a 
travesty on art. 

CAMPUS CALENDAR 

[Notices for this column should be dropped in 
the Collegian Office or handed to Alfred A 
Gioiosa' 16, on or before the Saturday preceding 
each issue. 1 

Nov. 4th. 
1-10 p. m. — Assembly, Pres. Ken- 
yon L. Butterfleld. Mass 
meeting. 
6-30 p. m.— Boy's club at Physical 
Director's office. 
Nov. 5th. 
r ,_30 ,.. M ._Glee club rehearsal in 
Chapel. 



Subscription I1.50 per year. Single 
copies, s cents. Make all orders payable 
to Maurice J. Clough. 

Entered as teeond-ctaes matter at the Amherst 
r«t Offtce. 

Vol. XXV. Tuesday, Nov. 3. No. 8 



ShsllS 

Plenty of them. 

12, 16 and 20 Gage 

Almost anything you want in size of shot. 

Black or Smokeless Powder 

Guns to Let by the Day 






Aggie spirit such as was shown 
Saturday cannot be passed by with- 
out a comment of some sort. It is 
hard work to get down to any task 
when wc have I feeling that it is 
practically hopeless. Such, perhaps, 
was not the case on Saturday but 
there must have been something akin 
to it in the hearts of the team as 
they went on the field. But hard 
clean playing was all that showed 
during the game. In the face of big 
odds the men were always putting 
their best into every play. Individ- 
ual stars may stand out but it will 
long be remembered that collectively 
there was never shown, by a team that 
represented this college, a better ex- 
hibition of the "never say die" spirit. 
There can be glory and honor in de- 
feat and they certainly rest on the 
football team at present. 



6-45 p. m.— M. A. C. C. A. in 
Chapel. 
Nov. 7th. 
3-10 p. m.— Football, Middlebury 

on Campus. 
4-00 p. m.— Informal. 

Nov. 8th. 
9-U> a. m.— Sunday Chapel. Mr. 
Albert K. Roberts, Inter- 
national Y. M. C. A., 
New York City. 
Nov. 10th. 
5-00 p. M. — Freshman class sing in 

Chapel. 
6-30 p. m.— War lecture by Or. 

Sprague. 
7 _ (> P> M ._Stockbridge Club in 

South College. 
7-15 p. m. — Landscape Art Club in 

Wilder hall. 
7-30 p. M.— Glee Club rehearsal in 

Chapel. 
7-30 p. m.— Bible class at Dr. Cham- 
berlain's home. 
Nov. 11th. 
l-io f. m.— Assembly, Prof. Frauk 
A. Waugh, M. A. C. 



HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The REXALL Store on the Corner 



UNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

REGULAR SUNDAY SERVICE AT 7 P M. 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 

MODERN REPAIR DEPT. 



E. RUSSELL NORTON 



SALES ACENT 



E.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOPMAN 



Davenport Miller 
Vein Coal 

Best Quality Pennsylvania Coal 



E. E. HILLETT 

JEWELER and OPTOMETRIST 

Lenses ground white you wait 

College Jewelry 

Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and Guitar Strings 

AMHERST, MASS. 
Nest to Post Office. 



Amherst 



CO - OP LAUNDRY 



The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

Jobbers of Wrought Iron and Brass Pipe, Valves 
*nd Fittings for Steam, Water and Gas. Asbestos 
and Magnesia Boiler and Pipe Coverings, Pipe 
Cut to Sketch, Mill Supplies. Engineers and 
Contractors for Steam and Hot Water Heating, 
Automatic Sprinkler Systems, Boiler and Engine 
Connections. • • Holyoke, Mas*. 



Reserved f«i* 



BECKMAN 



■ i < 1 1 ■ > i > ' 



LOW PRICE TAILORING CO. 

SUITS MADE TO ORDER 

Suits Cleaned, Pressed and Dyed. All kinds of 
Kepairihg for Ladies and Gentlemen neatly done. 
High-grade work by first class tailor. Work 
called for and delivered. Seli tickets for pressing, 
4 suits for #1.50 

GEORGE KOTOWITZ, Prop. 

Main Street, Amherst. Mass. Nash Block 

On your way to the Post Office. Tel. 438- W 



FLEMING'S SHOE STORE 



Northampton 



For particular people 

THE ELMS RESTAURANT 

213 Main St., Northampton 

(Near Amherst car line) 



t Quality Restaurant at Moderate 
Prices. 



High-Grade College Work TRY QUR SPECIALS 



It we may believe Mine. Montres- 
sori, tbe most effective method of 
teaching art appreciation is to sur- 
round the pupil with object* of artis- 
tic beauty. The mo8t of us are still 
undeveloped so far as art apprecia- 
tion is concerned— a cnraory acquaint- 
ance with Mona Lisa and September 
Morn constituting about the extent 
of our knowledge. In order to im- 
prove this regretable state of things, 
perhaps the first step should be to 
beautify certain unlieautifnl object* 
which perform the doubtful office of 
decorating the campus*. 

In this connection, a reference to 
the so-eaUed "stained" windows in 
the chapel would not be out of place. 
Frankly, they are atrocious, intoler- 
able ; they not only violate the prin- 
ciples of good taste but in so doing 
they inflict exquisite torture on every 
lensittve eye. It would not have 
involved any higher expense, if in 
the first place they had been colored 
a bit more harmoniously ; as It is, 
they are composed of half a dozen 
different colors, and all the colors 
clash. The side windows are fairly 



STATION REPORT 

The twenty-sixth annual report of 
the Experiment Station has just been 
received from the state printer. This 
is the first complete report since the 
new law affecting Station reports 
went into effect. The different pa- 
pers appear as separate bulletins, be- 
ing printed whenever they are ready 
for publication. All the bulletins for 
the year are paged consecutively, 
and when the year is ended they are 
bound into the annual report, pre- 
faced by the report of the Director. 
By means of this method the 
Station is saved something over a 
thousand dollars a year in expenses. 
Under the old plan the technical 
papers were all held until the end of 
the year and then were circulated as 
a part of a bulky report. With the 
new arrangement, however, a paper 
on any given subject is sent to those 
interested — and not to others. 

The present report is a volume of 
two hundred pages, and in addition 
to the usnal department records, it 
contains bulletins on such varied sub- 
jects as poultry disease, the cran- 
berry investigation, cattle foods, 
alfalfa, fertilizers, etc. 



BOSTON OFFICE NEW YORK OFFICE 

85 Water St. • Broadway 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

CURRAN & DYER, Props. 

Loose- Leaf Note Books and Fountain 
—Pens- 



Shirts, 
Collars, 
Cuffs, - 
Plain wash, 
Same, rough dry. 



10-15C 

% I-2C 
1 I-2C 

48c per doz. 
30c per doz. 



DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, |iS° a Su,t 

R. T. FRoST.Agent; D. Sherinyan, As»t. Agent 
Try our ticket system 

Put full name and address on laundry 



And a la carte service. 

OYSTERS STEAKS CHOPS 
FRIED CHICKEN, ETC. 

Open 6 a. m. to 1 1 p. m. 



Come to us for 



Fireplace Goods, Coat and Trow Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 



FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

< irown by the Floricultural Dept. 

We offer our surplus stock of cut 
flowers and plants at reasonable rates 
to students and faculty. This stock 
is grown in modern houses under 
ideal conditions. Roses, carnations, 
violets, chrysanthemums and sweet 
peas in season. 

OROWN ON THE CAMPUS 
TMiephM* aeo 




MS STUDIO 



THE IUTUM PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 



Everything in Photography 

Including Framing. 

(lood work speaks for Itself. 

s *ash Block, Amherst, Mass. 



STOCK JUDGING TEAM 

The Massachusetts Agriculturul 
eollege stock judging team, which 
took part iu the National Dairyman's 
show in Chicago, Fiidav, finished 
seventh out of a field of sixteen land- 
grant Colleges and secondary schools 
of agriculture. Although the show- 
ing of the team was as a whole not 
as high as expected, they did well, 
defeating the stock judging teams 
from Delaware, Nebraska, New 
Hampshire, Cornell, Maryland, Penn- 
sylvania, South Dakota, Oregon and 
Arkansas. Maine was the only New 
England college to finish ahead of 
Massachusetts, this team capturing 
third place and winning the Holstein 
scholarship. 

Massachusetts ranked very high 
on Guernseys and Ayrshires ; only 
one college succeeded in finishing 
ahead on the former breed, while 
they were forced to accept third 
place on the latter breed. As yet. 
no details or individual scores have 
been reported, nor has anything been 
heard of the winning of prizes. 



BOYS' CLUB WORK 

Kid (Jore gave an interesting talk 
to a few members of the class in 
Boys' Club work in the Drill hall last 
Wednesday night. The work of the 
ibiss, as he outlined it, will take up 
all phases of practical boy's work. 
Anyone interested in Roys' Club work 
is urged to attend these meetings. 
Kid knows all the ins and OUtfl and 
little tricks from personal experience 
and also knows how to teach them to 
others. 

The next meeting will bfl held 
tonight (Wednesday) at 0-H0 iu the 
Drill hall. This is to be an im|>ort- 
aut meeting so everybody out. 

For further announcement about 
this class watch the Christian Asso- 
ciation bulletin board. 



'14. — A chance meeting at Dur- 
ham, N. II. . resulted in a small re- 
union. The men were : Lawrence J. 
Hogg, Alfred L. Tower, Arthur (i. 
Weigel, and Charles W. Whippen. 

HENRY WALLACE SPEAKS 

(Continued from page ij 

in the last ten years is different than 
the world fifty years ago. This is 
seen in the European upheaval, the 
unrest of the masses, and tbe de» 
mands for rights and liberty. We 
need the clearest perception of right 
and wrong to meet this condition. 
Many men die of spiritual atrophy at 
thirty, forty, fifty and sixty. They 
think the same old things. A man 
will never be a leader unless he has 
an open mind, 

"Don't forget your obligations 
because yon ar« college graduates. 
No matter how long you live, you 
never can pay the state and nation 
for what they have done for you. 
Always remember yon art college 
men and vour dutv is to serve." 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 



Mr. Campion has just returned from England with the 

AQUASCUTUM 

OVERCOATS 
Wells-Margetson Neckwear, Caps & Knitted Vests 

On account of war it will not be possible to gel ;my more of 
these goods, so an early inspection will be to vour advantage. 




Fine Tailoring 



Men's Furnishings 



-See Our Agents- 



Hubbard's BasE Fertilizers 

the moM n onomicsl you can use. 

BetteR crops 



...-WWhUfct.... 



36BA*fl? 



°WNEC1\£ 



are the inevitable r<-*.uli 



THE ROGERS ft HUBBARD COMPANY, Middletown, Conn. 

«»ale«« wild Winktt, I'm 1 IhimI, Conn. 



WJ J CI are supplied every year 

DUrDCe S uCCQS ^ettomoreAraeri- 
IT can planters than are 

the seeds of any other growers. Do you know Burpee- 
Quality "Seeds that Grow" ? If not, we would like to 
make your acquaintance. Simply send us your address 
(a postal card will do) and you will receive Burpee's 
Annual for 1914,—a bright new hook of 1 H2 pages, which 
is recognized as "The Leading American Seed Catalog." 
Kindly write to-day! Address 

W. ATLEE BURPEE & CO., Burpee Buildings, Philadelphia 



F. A. S 




MEN'S store: 



USE OUR NEW CASH DISCOUNT CARD 
AND SAVE FIVE PER CENT ON 

SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING 

Furnishings and Custom Tailoring 



PRINTERS, 



No i, Cook Pl»ce, 



Amherst, M 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 3, 1914- 




THE 
SMOOTHEST 



T7R< 



LOM Kick-off to Touch-down Velvet is pre- 
* eminently the popular pipe preferment! The 
two years aging in the leaf gives Velvet a maturing rare in 
these days. Tune only can produce the smoothness and 

the full flavor of this tobacco, and 
time it takes to get rid of your old 
foe, "the bite!*" Velvet — mellow 
and smooth, will unquestionably 
please you. All dealers. 
Don't hesitate I 



Jf/p&ut Lt M s W a wR 1 Ck 



1 




10 

InfuI12 



THE 

Hoover & Smith Go. 

616 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 
.....Diamond Merchants 

Philadelphia's Official Fraternity Jeweler 

SPECIALISTS IN 

Fraternity Badges, Fobs. Novelties, 

Rings, Charms Prises Trophies. 

Medals College Pins, Fobs. Seals, 

Rings, Charms 



S. S. HYDE 

JKWELER & OPTICIAN 

Now st 13 Pleasant St. 

Oculist V Pr«scrii>tious Filled. Uroken I .trues 

Accurately Replaced. Fine Watch Repairing 
Promptly and >kllfulH Done. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 



E. B. DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 

Williams Hlock, Amherst. Mass. 

omce Hours: Q to 1? a m.. i-Joto $ p. si. 



19x6 INDEX 

All copy for the 1916 Index is now 
in the bands of the printer and the 
engravings for the first part of the 
book are complete. Proof on the 
fore part has lieen received and some 
of it has been returned. There is no 
doubt now but that the book will be 
out on time and the question is, how 
many men are going to be dis- 
appointed by not buying a ticket for 
the book. The fathers and mothers 
of the students are always interested 
in the college and the best way to 
picture it to them is by the use of :tn 
Index. Those of the other sex :it 
home or over the river or mountain 
also like to see the Index and many of 
the fellows find in it a valuable aid in 
their calls. The Index is one of the 
best methods of getting new men to 
the college that has ever been devised 
and if some high school bov gets one 
he will be all the more likely to come 
to M. A. ( . 

A few weeks ago the board of edi- 
tors were puzzled as to how they were 
to fill the tweuty-two pages that were 
devoted to grinds, but after the wits 
of the class had done their part the 
task of the editors was how to limit 
the grinds to fifty pages. It might 
be well for some of the boys who are 
having a little trouble wilh their 
agronomy to look up the ragtime defi- 
nition of symbiosis or to find the date 
I when the firm red mackinaw made an 
appearance on the campus. The 
time will not be long until the book 
will be on sale and the wise ones will 
be in the front rank when the starter's 
gun is fired. 

PHOTO PLAY CLUB 

Students interested in the art or 
technique of the photo-drama are in- 
vited to communicate with Professor 
Neal, with a view to organizing an 
informal club for the study of the 
subject. 



"SCOTTIE" 
H. HOOPER 

Will c lean and press your clothes so you 

will be satisfied. It costs no more 

and he is nearer to "Aggie." 

I IBKRAI TtCBST SVSTFM 

Under Columbia Cafe 



STEAM PITTING. Telephone jo— K 

GAS FITTING. TINNING. 

F. W. DANCE & CO., Plumbers 

Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, Memorial 
Windows, Lead Lights, &c. 

I Clifton Ave.. AMHERST, MASS. 



THIS T«I»r»«sY r»Af*I-OI» 

< i. mains; Pressing Repairing 
Quickest Mi-rlc*, Beat Work, Lowest Prim 
All woik tarefylly done. Work called for sad 
delivered. Onts* overcoats, suit*, pants and 
coats. Ladies* hne linen suits a specialty. 
Teams will call every day at M. A. C. 

WW. iiiinkiiv. Prop. 
Rear Nath Bl'k, Amherst. Tel. No. jss-s 



Now is the time to be planning for 



FraternityGroups 



Have them taken at 



MISS McCLELLAN'S STUDIO 



44 State Street, 



Northampton, Mass. 



CAMPUS NOTES 
The Florist and flurdeners' club of 
M. A. C will combine with the 
Florist and Gardeners' club of North- 
ampton and Holyokc for a meeting 
Tuesday evening nt 7 o'clock in 
French hall. Mr. Uutler from FiehlV 
store in Northampton will give a talk 
on floral decorations and the judges 
will award the prizes for table decora- 
tions of the junior floriculture class. 
Accompanied by Mr. Shrek, l.'l 
delegates from Massachusetts at- 
tended the reception and banquet 
given at Smith college SatunlHV 
evening, by the Intercollegiate Mis- 
sionary Union. About 500 delegates 
were present, from .ill the men's and 
women's colleges of the Connecticut 
Valley. After the banquet there 
were speeches by the Kev. Samuel 
Higginbottom and Rev. William 
Chamberlin, both well known in the 
missionary field. Representatives 
from here attended also the Sunday 
sessions of the conference, compris- 
ing vespers and a final evening 
session. 



CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 
The main speaker at the weekly 
Christian Association meeting, held 
last Thursday, was Frank P. Rand, 
a recent addition to the faculty. 
The first part of the evening was 
taken up by A. C. LeDuc '15, who 
gave a report of the Social Service 
convention which was held in Boston 
on Oct. 16. 

Mr. Rand's talk was on "Weeds," 
and was in part as follows : 

"Weeds may be defined as vegeta- 
tion out of place. In a bed of beets 
everything is pulled out even though 
it may be a flower ; in a bed of flow- 
ers the opposite thing is done. I am 
going to mentiou a few weeds likely 
to appear ou the M. A. C. campus. 

The first weed is alcohol which is 
a fine thing when used in a fuel lamp 
or as an antiseptic, but it is another 
thing whan it appears in the wine- 
glass. Don't let alcohol become a 
weed. 

The uext weed is criticism. This 
is a very excellent plant in itself but 
may become a weed which is known 
as a 'knocker.' Don't let criticism 
become a weed. 

The third one is college spirit. 
We all have this enthusiasm which is 
called eollege spirit. Don't let this 
spirit, which is a fine thing in itself, 
become a weed. 

As you go out into the world, 
prepare your ground with a receptive 
mind, keep out the weeds, ami may 
Qed grant you a bountiful harvest." 
Klgin Sherk then gave out a par- 
tial list of the classes to be formed 
this winter, wilh their teachers, 
which is as follows : Ten (ireat Re- 
ligions, Prof. W. A. Hart; Problems 
in Christian Thinking, and The Bible 
in English and American Literature, 
Prof. Frank P. Rand ; Student 
Standards of Action, Erwin Forbush ; 
Student Life Problems, Prof. J. S. 
Chamberlaiu ; Agricultural Missions, 
Pres. K. L. Butterfield : Scientific 
Aspects of Religion, Prof. C. E. 
Marshall ; Boys* Club Work and 
Rot Scout Work, II. M. Gore; 
Fraternity Problems, Prof. C E. 
Wellington. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

The Extension Service has recently 
issued a circular on the subject of 
lectures and lecture courses. The 
publication is intended to be distrib- 
uted throughout the rural sections of 
the state. Nearly 50 men, for the 
most part members of the faculty, 
are prepared with public lectures on 
a variety of topics. On two weeks 
notice the service is able to send oui 
a speaker on nearly any desired sub- 
ject pertaining to agriculture or 
rural life, and it is expected that 
Granges and similar organizations 
will make immediate use of t\m 
opportunity. 

The final nnmbtr of the M. A. C 
Bulletin, volume VI, appeared last 
week and is now ready for general 
distribution. It contains the short 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 3, 1914. 



7 



course announcements for the ensu- 
ing year, and a complete schedule 
for the winter and summer schools. 
In addition to the regular ten weeks 
courses, in which the student will be 
given a choice among any of 25 sub- 
jects, special courses will be offered 
in apple packing, beekeeping, tree 
warden's work etc. Farmer's Week 
will come March 15-19, and March 
25, it is announced, will be devoted 
to a "Polish Farmers' Day." 

Professor Sears' new book on 
Orchard Management and Professor 
Waugh's new book on Rural Im- 
provement arc receiving wide notice 
and many compliments. 



hotel Warren 

South Deerfield, Mass. 



T. J. AHERN, MANAGER 



OVER 63 Y CARS- 
EXPERIENCE 




Trade Marks 

Designs 
Copyrights Ac. 

Anvons sending asketrh snd description msy 
quickly aacertmn our opinion free whether an 
invention Is prohaliljr r»ueniul>le. < "ommunli -i- 
lionaainctlrronOdeiitial. HANDBOOK on Patents 
sent free. Oldest agency for securing patents. 

Patents taken through Mann A Co. receive 
iptctal notic*, without c harg e. In the 

Scientific American. 

A handsomely Illustrated weekly. Lara-eat elf. 
dilation of any scientific Journal. Terms, S3 a 
rear: four months, tL Sold by all newsdealer*. 

MUNN SCo."« ■— - New York 

branch Office, Ob * 8t_ Washington. D. C. 



|Batchelder & Snyder Co. 

PACKERS, POULTRY UKKSSKKS 
AND BUTTER MAI 



-WHOLESALE DIALERS 1N- 



|Beef, Mutton. Lamb, Veal, Pork. Lard, Ram*. 

Kacon, Sausages, Poultry, Game, Butter 

Cheese, bggs, Beans. 

ptice 4 St.>n»* Utff^fMt, ■>! & <-'> Hlackstnn • St. 

Bast >■!. Packing tieu.se, Urightou. Mass. 

S iti.'e P 111.tr V Dressing Plant, Boston. 

Creameries in Vermont. 



§1 LAVAL 

Cream Separators 

Make FaU and Winter 
Dairying More rofi table 

Til ERE are special advantages in oil ruj ■ 
good OHM separator during the fall 
anil winter months 
The milk from cows long in lactation Is 
hardest to cream— and likewise hardest to 
separate with an inferior separator. 

Moreover, cream and butter prices are 
highest, so that the waste of gravity setting 
nt a poor separator count s for most, 

1 hen there's the sweet, warm skim-milk for 

stock feeding, alone worth the coat of a sepa- 

> <t"r in cold weather. 

There is surely no reason to delay the pur- 

hase of a separator or to continue the use of 

n inferior one. 

You can't a fiord to 
wait until next spring. 
Let the De Laval start 
saving cream for you 
tight now and it will 
•are its cost by* spring. 
See the nearest 
De Laval agent at 
once, or if yon do 
net knew him, write 
hi direct for any de 
sired information. 

HE DE UVAL SEPARATOR CO. 

S3** 




STOCKBRIDGE CLUB 

Some fifty students at the Stock- 
bridge Club last Tuesday night availed 
themselves of the opportunity to hear 
a speaker of unusual interest, name- 
ly, Dr. Wallace, editor of WaUwx'a 
Farmer. President Butterfield in- 
troduced him as a minister, farmer, 
and friend of the people. His sub- 
ject was the "Landlord and Tenant 
Problem in England." 

Throughout Dr. Wallace's speach 
he emphasized the fact that the peo- 
ple who did the actual tilling of the 
soil would sooner or later own it. As 
instances of this he gave Ireland for 
an example, where the peasants are 
becoming land-holders more and more. 
"In Massachusetts we have an ex- 
ample of this" he said "and the Poles 
and Canadian French will soon own 
all of the farming land which is good 
for anything, because they are will- 
ing to get out and till their farms 
themselves. This coucluded Dr. 
Wallace's talk and after answering a 
few questions relative to the tenant 
question, the meeting was adjourned. 

N1NETEEN-THIRTEEN NOTES 

Wallace C. Forbush, professor of 
Agronomy, Soils, Bacteriology and 
Farm Mechanics, College of Agricul- 
ture and Mechanic Arts, Mayaquez, 

Two more 1913 men have gone and 
done it. Lawrence Burby, manager 
of the Knglerock Poultry Farm, 
Belchertown, was married in New 
York last month and Waldo G. 
Tucker, instructor at Peabody High 
school, married Miss Alfreda B. 
Clement of Lynn, Aug. 19. Home 
address, 60 Lovers Leap Ave., Lynn. 

Saturday night the following Thir- 
teeners held a little get-together at 
the Highland, Springfield. "Doc" 
Fry of Mousou, "Joe" Cobb of 
Bildieiul Bend, "Burt" Harris of 
Connecticut, "Editor" Griggs of 
Chicopee Falls, George Zabriskie, 
2nd, also of Chicopee Falls, and H. 
M. Gore of M. A. C. The big topic 
of discussion was the showing of that 
"leain" at Tufts Saturday and the 
dopiug out of how best "1913" could 
bvlp "boost" at the Springfield game 
the 14th. Gentlemen of 1913, this 
in part was the verdict : First that 
everv blamed 1913 man make a 
special effort to be at the game, that 
every 1913 man should cut all busi- 
ness appointments, marriage and 
fuueral dates, etcetera to "boost" the 
team that already has scored on Dart- 
mouth, trimmed Holy Cross and 
played Tufts to a standstill ; second 
that we "bunch up" during the game ; 
third that if there is to be an alumni 
gathering (which we must fervently 
hope there is) that "1913" attend 
"en masse" ; bat if there is to be no 
definite alumni gathering; "1913" 
gets together directly after the game 
and settles down at the Highland for 
one of those good old feeds. Spot 
"Doc" Fay or "Kid" Gore at ths 
game and get full details. 

Walter £. Rosobrooks, farming at 
Storm, Conn. Address, Kngleville, 
Conn. 

Arthur R. Lundgren, Assistant 
Farm Superintendent, Rhode Island 
State College* Kingston, R. I. 

Clark L. Thayer, Instructor in 
Floriculture at New York State Col- 
lege of Agriculture at Cornell univer- 
sity spoke before the M. A. C. Flprist 
club, while on * brief visit to the col- 
lege last weak. 



Che pheasant 

Bruin? St., Bmberst 

Breakfast, Luncheon, 
Afternoon Tea. 

Dinner if arranged (or. 

Telephone 470 

Rooms for Transients. 




An Especially Qood Commission Proposition- 
Cash for test orders— Article wnlelv Advertised— 
Cuts down expense in power 1 l.nils— Address 
Enihnbkrinu Srri-i \ Co.. ;i\s N Mtli Mreet, 
Philadelphia. Pa. 



theTeachers Exchange 

Of Baton ISO Hoy I si on St. 

Recommends Teachers, Tutors and Schools 



* They're not short-lived 

The Jerseys 

In 1913 eighteen lersev 
cows wire oThciaily tested 
which av r as'd 12 years 
a:id 7 monies ol are. Their 
a /.'race unite production 
vasb 7 rounds. Average 
butti 1 , t. ,1 7 pounds. One 
oi th ' cows was over 18 
years Did. 

Longevity, Cim.'i 'u'wi vf4 Economic 
Production are j i-t ».js c mi,,, luifslici, 

THE AMERICAN JtRVr.Y ClTfll Cl'JB 

3.4 W. 23d St.. f..'w York ' uy 




MqpRrs "ij» 



FOUNTAIN PEN 



Ml I l^^ Minimize your fountain pen 
f V ^^^^ troubles by owning a Moore's. C. It Is the 
• / ^s^aafest. soundest and most dependable pen known. 
~ C. Its strength lies in its very simplicity. Nothing 
flniky to get out of order. C. You can give your- 
self no better treat than a Moore's Non-leakable. jt 

For Sale by Dealers Everywhere 
American Fountain Pen Company 
Adams, CJushlng. St Foster, Selling Agents 
US DEVONSHIRE STREET :: :: BOSTON, MASS. 



E. Frank Coe Fertilizers 

1 OC7 THE BUSINESS FARMERS' STANDARD \ Q| A 
lOOt FOR OVER FIFTY-FIVE YEARS 1314 




Do You Raise 300 Bushels of Potatoes per Acre? 

HREE hundred bushels per acre is 
not an unusual yield by any means, 
but did you get it this year ? 
tjjlf you were planning to raise 300 
bushels of potatoes to the acre how 
far apart would you space your rows? 

How far apart would you drop the seed pieces in 

the row? 

QHow much fertilizer would you use to grow 30(1 
bushels of potatoes per acrer How would you 
apply it ? 

flAre you sure that your seed potatoes are true to 
name and true to type ? 

flWhat are you doing to prevent "scab,** and early 
and late blight ? 

•JDid you have a short crop of potatoes because of 
dry weather ? Have you decided how you will 
^overcome this trouble in the future ? 



«JAII ihese practical points, and many mure 

book 



era fully covered sin our 



ft 



"Potatoes: A Money Crop 

which will be seal Iras le «v«r? potato grower who requests s eopy, snd 

mentions this paper, 

GThit book is written by a rasa who himself has had years of experience as 

• potato grower, and who has made s carelul study of the best methods of 

other growers. 

«Jlf ysa read this book you will keep it for luturc reference It is a "worth 

while" publication. 



The Coe-Mortimer Company 

51 CHAMBERS STREET, NEW YORK CITY 














8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 3, 1914- 



- JOIN THE BUNCH AT- 
EPSTEINS TAILORING PARLORS 

N.ih Incited iivfi pott "Itici*. L'p one Hight 

Pressing and Cleaning a Specially 

Literal Ticket System iel,36-M 

SHOE STORE 

Shoes Repaired by Machinery 

SHOE SHINE 

< )|>en Sunday from 7-u. On y»ur way to I'. < >. 

The Highland Hotel 

Cortifr oi Hillman ami BarfiM Stre»U, three 
blocks from the Inion Depot, ia m modem hos- 
telry run on the European rlaa. It i» Ins* J''*P 
from Main Street, away from the noise and dust 
and yet in the center ol the business district. 

It* roomi are well hiini-.)u*d and comfortable, 
having a telephone and hot Bad cold running 
water in rvet y room I'll..- Sj I SBfl tip: rooms 
with bath (single) IM.SO and up. 

Its excellent f uisme an i well ventilated dim Bg 
room makes a meal a pleasant memory— «very 
thing ol the highest noallty, well cooked and 
serviwl in the best possible manner. 

Stayat the Highland Hotel once and you will 
anticipate sta\in« theie again. M1IUC everv 
evening 

D. H. SIEVERS, 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College! fountain pens 



Offers courses of instruction in twenty eight teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 



Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 

Agricultural Chemistry 



Moore's Swan's 

Waterman's 

Thirty-six dozen pens to select from. 

OUR RULE 



Hi|(ltlMllil Hotel, 



S|H illgli. -III. MrtK*. 



Agricultural Fconomics 

Rural Sociology 

Economic Entomology 

Microbiology 

Plant Physiology and Pathology 

Agricultural Education 

Rural Social Science 

For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 

KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



"Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded." 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 




STUDEMTFUBHITUBE 

RUGS 

CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland cf Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWES EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 

K. I). MARSH ESTATE 

COX SONS 

— ANI> — 

VINING 

7S-74 Madison Avenue. New York 

CAPS AND GOWNS 

liest Material! and Workmanship 

WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

tf Main St., Masonic Bldg,, 
Northampton, Mass. 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



Joint Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics, 

M. A- C. Athletic Fie'd Association. 

The College Semite, 

Football Association , 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association. 

Hockey Association. 

Tennis Association, 

Ride club, 

BoUter Bolsters 

Musical Association. 

Nineteen Hundred Fifteen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Sixteen Index, 

M. A. C. Christian Association, 

M. A. C. Catholic Club. 

Fraternity Conference, 
Ktoekbridge dob, 



.1. F. Nicholson, Prod 



Philip H. Smith, Secretary 
C. S. Hicks, Treasurer 
K. Towne, President 
J. A. Price, Manager 
S. Prouty, Manager 
E. F. Clark, Manager 
B. S. Draper, Manager 
H. Bishop, Manager 
It. M. Upton, President 
uciug and Business Manager 
F. A. AnderBon, Manager 
H. M. Rogers, Manager 
L. E. Fielding, Manager 
H. H. White, President 
.1 . E. Harper, President 
F. W. Buell, President 
P. F. Whitmore, President 



K.Tiei.HHili 1B09 

Stkfhkn Lank Folobb 
MANorAcruiuNe jbwblbb 

1W) BROADWAY, NEW YORK 

CIATB AND COLLEGE 
1>LN8 AND RINGS «* 

OOLD. BILVIOR AND BRONSWB MHOAIH 



RAHAR'S INN 

Northampton, MMHChmtta 
TWO BLOCKS F*OM THE DSPOT 

The hotel where theie is comfort (with 

out extravagance.) More popular 

than ever. 

Special Luncheon 12— 1 P. M. 

PRIVATE DININC ROOMS 

A la Carte Service 

From 6-30 to 1 1 P. M. 



■e in Seven Oowd Reason* why youshould 
buy four 



COAL 

or 

C. R. ELDER 



Stationery, Newspapers, 
Magazines and Col- 
lege Supplies 

A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer. 



The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Ml., alongside the 
famous Bloody Brook battle ground 
to Old Deerfield, thence to Green- 
field, Turners Falls and across the 
"Plains'* to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 

SO Mite* of Trackage -nodern 
t. qui pine n t I rain Dispatch- 
ing >\ stem Pre ifcht and Ex- 
press Service over entire line. 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
Company 



CARS 



Leave AdOlE COLLEGE for MOL- 
YOKE at 15 mln. past the hour. 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST for AOOIE COL- 
LEO.E at 7 «nd 37 mln. past the hour. 



SpKSICulM 



R«U* 



MHERS1 & SUNDERLAND ST. RY. CO 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 



LUNCHES 



SODA, 



M 



ChMtd mfy prem / A. M lo 4 * *> 



For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain thdr prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product, 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of "Gold Medal, Uniforms, ',* 
14x1-1426 Chestnut St., 



For a Daily and Sunday Newspaper] 
You should Read 

nemws 

Springfield Republican 

While you are at college in Amherst 

1 1 he* »U ot Thm M.A.Q. »ow« 
The BMt SportlBg Mews 
rati «..•!•■ 1 h 1 n •■ » - 
A Strom k.i 1 t..r Ihi Pag* 

I .11.1 . -.1 i MK K.-HI 11 r.-« 

it u • n»»t m«w»p»p« 

Daffy, 3 cents *, 70 cents 1 month ; %i 
a quarter, 

Sunday, § cents-, 50 cents a quarter. 

Subscribe br ntil or through On AmhMil Si- 




SCflliW 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXV. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, November 10. 1914. 



No. 9 



IMPROVED ATTENDANCE 

AT SECOND INFORMAL 



M1DDLEBURY GAME WON BY 
DARLING'S 87 YARDS DASH 



FOURTEEN GAMES COMPLETE 
1915 BASEBALL SCHEDULE 



Drawn by Middlebury Game About 

Fifty Couples Enjoy Dance in 

Drill Hall Saturday Night. 

On Saturday afternoon and eve- 
ning, the second informal of the sea- 
son was held in the Drill Hull. Al- 
though there were fifty-two couples 
who attended, an increase of 15 j 
couples over the first informal, this! 
affair was only sparsely attended 
when compared to similar conditions 
in former years. However, it was 
very enjoyable to all present, a foot- 
ball game and a cross-country meet 
rendering abundant entertainment 
and excitement. One slip up, which 
was the cause of several complaints, 
:ni(i added to the entertainment, was 
the supper at Draper Hall, which 
was far from the usual standard. 
The redeeming feature of the whole 
affair was the excellent music fur- 
nished by the orchestra, composed 
of Aggie students. 

The hall was skillfully decorated, \ 
though the lack of materials limited 
the artistic temperament of the in- 
formal committee. The customary 
long strips of maroon bunting hung 
perpendicularly from the center of the 
ceiling, directly above the orchestra, 
and branched off to all parts and 
corners of the hall, making the effect 
especially pleasing. An immense 
American flag draped the north-east- 
ern wall, and a smaller Stars and 
Stripes curtained the opposite cor- 
ner. The banners and pennants 
which decked the walls were very 
noticeable, and together with the 
large electric-lighted Mat the south, 
the usual bare appearance of the hall 
was partly overcome. A large ma- 
hogany table below the balcony was 
laden with refreshments, which the 
iuformalites made good use of l>e- 
tween dances. 

The patronesses were % M rs. 
Storv and Mrs. Cbsrrfberlain of M 

A. 0. 1 Mrs. Orcntt of Smith college 
and Mrs. Wheeler of Mt. Holyoke 
'•ollege. Those who attended were : 

1915— L. B. Damon, E. C, Towne, 
U..L Lewis. W.U. Kennedy, A. Wil- 
km». W, H. Hatfield, K. 8. Draper. 
Q. F. Hyde. M. J. Clough, P. Hil- 
Ureth. W. H. Haskell, B, K. Tower, 

B. H. Archibald. G, E. Perry, W. 
II. Sears.' V. L, Severenee and H. 
Rogers, 

191§— F. A. Anderson, L. K. 



Aggie Halfback, Catching Pass on 

13-Yard Line, Gets Off for 

Only Score of Game. 

Darling's 87 yard run which culmi- 
nated in a touchdown with the result- 
ing goal by Palmer provided the seven 
points by which M. A. C. averted a 
scoreless tie with Middlebury on the 
campus Saturday. The run started 
with the interception of a forward 
pass on Aggie's 13 yard line and 
aided by brilliant dodging and splen- 
did interference Darling went the 
length of the field for a touchdown. 

The game as a whole was a disap- 
pointment. The home team, with a 
partially substitute lineup seemed to 
In- Mill suffering from the effects of 
last week's game with Tufts. Mid- 
dlebury was evidently underrated, 
but came through in fine style, the 
line proving very strong and the j 
backs showing good defensive work. 
For M. A. C. the one bright light was 
"Red" Darling. He alone seemed 
able to gain ground consistently and 
with Palmer he proved a bulwark 
of defense against Middlehury's 
often attempted forward ptoses. 
For Middlebury Ibehaii and Lang 
played well while Jones at end near 
the end of the game showed up 
strongly. The game was marred by 
frequent penalties, Aggie being off- 
side too often while Middlebury was 
penalized 45 yards for holding. 
game in detail : 

H»T ^UAltTllK. 

Middlebury kicked off, tin 
being run back 10 yards to the W 
yard line. Darling made SO yards 
and Palmer made nine. Whorf lost 
two, Palmer failed to gain but a 
forward pass, Palmer to Plaisted. 
■ netted first down. Darling hit end 
j for three yards but on the next play 
i A g8 ,e WSi offside. A forward pass 
failed to gain and Palmer tried a 
drop kick which failed. Middlebury 
put the hall in play on her W yard 
line and Breban made nine yards. 
I Middlebury made first down on the 
next play but an end tub failed and ] 
two forward passes were incomplete. 
Middlebury kicked to Aggte'sifl yard 
line where a tackle buck netted 
Aggie three yards. A forward pass 
made it firit down, Darling reeled 
off *25 yards and Palmer plugged the 
line for three. Whorf failed to gain 



The 



ball 



Dartmouth, Syracuse and TuflB are 
Among Those Slated for Dia- 
mond Contests Next Spring. 

The baseball schedule a 3 arranged 
by Manager Prouty for the season of 
1915 is an especially attractive oue. 
Although not quite as long as last 
year's, it is nevertheless a haul one 
and will test the team's ability to the 
utmost. There are 14 games in all, 
sis of which are to be played on the 
campus and two on Pratt Field. 
Three new teams appear on the list, 
two of which are New Hampshire 
and Syracuse, who will play on the 
campus, and Trinity will be played 
at Hartford. Between April 80 and 
May 14, there will be five consecutive 
games played in Amherst, thus 
affording the student body a good 
chance to follow the progress of the 
team. Two games will be played 
with Amherst as is customary, while 
Norwich and Vermont each appear 
twice The necessity for long, ex- 
tended trip* has l»een avoided as 
much M DOtelWe in making up the 
schedule, only one being necessary 
on which Norwich and Vermont will 
l>e played oti successive days. The 
schedule is as follows : 
April IT, Trinity— Hartford. 

2:5. New Hampshire— Campus. 

S4, Dartmouth— Hanover. 

30, Syracuse— Campus. 
May 5, Springfield— Campus. 
7, Vermont — Campus. 

12, Amherst— Pratt Field. 

14, Norwich — Campus. 

21, Norwich — Noithfleld. 

22. Vermont— Burlington. 
2H, Holy Cross — Worcester, 
SI, Tufts— Med ford. 

.lane "1, Boston College— Campus. 

15, Amherst— Pratt Field. 



GOOD SHOWING EXPECTED IN 
GAME AGAINST SPRINGFIELD 

With Schlotterbeck and Dole in Line- 
up Again, Prospects for Satur- 
day Appear Brilliant. 

Springfield next 1 The last game 
of the year and the biggest OB6 of the 
reason. Kvery man will be down 
there from college and they will see a 
gaffifl that is going to open the eyes 
of the inhabitants of the town of 
Springfield and the surrounding coun- 
try that will make them remember the 
Aggie team for quite a while. Down 
there the; are rating the Aggie team 
on what we showed against Middle- 
bury instead of our Tufts game, and 
they are making a mistake that the 
team should be able to show them. 

Coach Brides when interviewed in 
regard to the game said. '•Chances 
have never been brighter than they 
are for I his Springfield game. The 
hospital list is coming along finely and 
we shoulu l»e able to show our mruug- 
est lineup on Saturday. Schlotter- 
beck. Curtail and Fuller will all be 



AMERICAN YEAR BOOK 
In the American Tear took tor 

1913. Dr. K. W. Allen *«.*i, represent- 
ing the Depnitment of Agriculture, 
and Dr. K. P. Felt *91, representing 
the American Association of Eco- 
nomic Kntomologists, apjtear as 
members of the Supervisory Board : 
in addition Dr. W. A. Hooker '99 
andH. L Knight '02, are editors in 




Caitaih Mkmcax 



( Continued on pare i j 



[Continued oo BSSS ij 



ready to get into the game and will 
the departments of economic ento- ^ ^ - m g^ condition to play. I 
mology and agricultural legislation ^^^^f the game played last Satm 
respectively. The Y>ar B»»k U an <JbV m % reaction that must be ex- 
annual record of American events . p^^ afi^f ft hard game as was the 
and progress. \c$m the week before at Medford. 






i 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 10, 1914. 



Work this week should round the 
team into the best shape that it has 
attained this season. The backfield 
is stronger than it has been at any 
time this year and with the return of 
the injured tackles the line is going 
to be strengthened so that it will be 
at least as strong as m the Tufts 
game." 

There will be mass meetings this 
week that will give the men a chance 
to get the idea of what the faculty 
know about the Springfield game and 
will also give the upper classmen a 
chance to give their opinions. It is 
going to be a chance to get your 
enthusiasm aroused for that game and 
every man should be out to all of 
them. This is the last game of the 
year and it is going to be a good one. 
Every man should be down at the field 
on Saturday to back the team to the 
very last minute. Let us get in to it 
with the 1 ight spirit and do it up well. 

Springfield's scores for this season 
are as follows : 

Sept. 26, Springfield 39, Worcester Tech o 
Oct. 3, 

" 10, 

" 17. 

" 24. 

" 3«. 
Nov. 7, 

Springfield's line-up souuds pretty 
familiar to some of us and we will be 
able to recognise them on the field. 
Captain Hell is playing left end and 
is a good man on catching the for- 
ward passes. Holmes and Clapp are 
playing the tackles. Stine and Pried* 
bind are at guards while Cooper fin- 
ishes up the center of the line. Cant- 
well will probably be at the other end 
of the line from Hell. Miller or Schab- 
inger is at the quarterback position 
with Fountain, Meyers, Jones or 
Williams the choice for halfbacks and 
(iibsou at fullback. 

The Aggie line-up that will star* 
the game is not definitely decided and 
as there is always a large squad taken 
to this game the changes in the line- 
up dining the game may be more fre- 
quent than has ordinarily been the 
custom this season. 

Springfield, then, a large delegation 
of the whole student body, lots of 
enthusiasm and VICTORY. 



0. 


Harvard 


44 


25. 


Holy Cross 





'3. 


Williams 


«7 


54 


Norwich 





26. 


Muldlebury 


7 


20. 


Amherst 






FLOWER SHOW 

Floriculture had its innings last 
Tuesday and Wednesday, when the 
much heralded Flower Show took 
place in French hall. 

Tuesday afternoon the show was 
opened to the student body and the 
faenlty, and the same evening a joint 
meeting was held by the Florists* and 
Gardeners* Club and two florists* 
clubs from Holyoke and Northamp- 
ton. Mr. Butler, of Field's store in 
Northampton, gave an informal ad* 
dress on the general subject of com* 
mercial floriculture. On Wednesday 
the show was open to the general 
public. 

The exhibits were varied in charac- 
ter, but most notable were the groups 
of huge chrysanthemums, arranged 



tastefully about the various rooms. 
Roses, carnations, ferns, and sundry 
plant novelties were also on view ; 
most of the specimens were grown in 
the college greenhouses, which speaks 
very well for the work of the depart- 
ment. In one of the rooms was an 
interesting exhibit of baskets, jardi- 
nieres, vases and pottery, the acces- 
sories being furnished by the depart- 
ment. There were exhibits also from 
Girard Foster, Lenox ; Peter Fisher, 
Ellis ; and Rutler & Oilman, North- 
ampton. The greenhouse of Eber 
Holmes furnished a choice collection 
of Montrose roses. 

In the main room were shown sam- 
ple arrangements of flowers in boxes 
and vases. Corsage bouquets, bou- 
tonuieres and bridal bouquets, made 
up by members of the senior class, 
were also on exhibit 

Perhaps the most interesting feat- 
ure of the show was the competitive 
exhibit of table decorations. Sixteen 
members of the junior floriculture 
class entered the competitions, three 
prizes being offered of five dollars, 
three dollars, and a subscription to a 
trade paper. A number of the table 
decorations were highly satisfactory 
from an artistic point of view, and 
the judges, Mr. A. Butler of North- 
ampton, Mr. A. I). (Jalivan of Hol- 
yoke and Mr. K. S. Sinclair of South 
Hadlev. no doubt found it difficult to 
arrive at a final decision. The 
feminine element, however, carried 
off the honors, first and second prizes 
beiug awarded to Miss Kthel Chase 
and Miss Gertrude White respec- 
tively. The former used pink 
Dorothy Dan chrysanthemums, made 
up in a basket with maidenhair fetus. 
Miss White's decorations consisted 
of a central mound of bronze sin- 
gle chrysanthemums with asparagus 
sprengeri. The third prize went to 
Ray McKechnie, whose table was 
decked with bronze chrysanthemums 
and the autumn foliage of the. Japanese 
maple. Charles Hathaway, with red 
Windsor carnations and white carna- 
tion favors, received honorable men- 
tion. 

A large number of townspeople 
attended together with visitors from 
neighboring communities, and the 
general verdict was highly favorable 
to those who had managed the affair. 
Professor Nehrling and Mr. A. 8. 
Thurston were the faculty supervisors. 



INFORMAL 

[Continued from page 1] 



SOPHOMORE FRESHMAN GAME 

The annual Sophomore-Freshman 
football game, which was played 
Thursday afternoon, Nov. 5, on the 
campus, resulted in a 20-0 victory 
for the Sophomores. Although the 
game was hard-fought, clean cut, and 
exciting throughout, the Freshmen 
never had a chance with their heavier 
opponents and there was a notice- 
able lack of team work on both sides. 
Many substitutions took place for 
both teams, but even with their sec- 
ond string men in the game the 
Sophomores showed that they were 
superior to the Freshmen in all de- 
partments of the game. For the 
Sophomores Puffer, Higgins, Ed- 
wards, and Higginbotham were the 
mainstays of the team with the punt- 
ing of Mack also showing up to ad- 
vantage ; for the Freshmen Sedgwick, 
Goodwin and Maginnis played well. 
The feature plays of the game were 
Higginbotham's catch of a long for- 
ward pass in the third period and 
Maginnis* 20-yard run in the fourth 
quarter. 

The Sophomores kicked off and 
soon after recovered a fumble on the 
Freshmen's 30-yard line. Higgin- 
botham, after a few long rushes 
through the line, carried the ball 
over for the first score of the game. 
Warren kicked the goal. Score : 
Sophomores 7, Freshmen 0. 

Soon after, the Freshmen had the 
ball on their own 15-yard line and, 
failing to gain, were forced to punt. 
Puffer broke through, blocked the 
kick, and recovered the ball. On 
the next play Higginbotham at- 
tempted a delayed forward pass to 
Puffer. The ball was juggled about 
by members of both teams until 
Horstrom finally grasped it and fell 
over the line for a touchdown. War- 
ren missed the goal by a narrow mar- 
gin. Sophomores 13, Freshman 0. 

In the third quarter came the star 
play of the game. It was the Sophs' 
ball in the middle of the field when 
Mack threw a low forward pass. 
Higginbotham caught the oall and al- 
though tackled from behind he 
brought the ball to the 6-yard line. 
Mack scored on the next play and 
Warren kicked the goal. Sopho- 
mores 20, Freshmen 0. The fourth 
quarter was uneventful. 

FRESHMEN. 
I Robinson 
' ( Bunch 

I" 



MIDDLEBURY GAME 

[Continued from page 1] 



but Paimer made it first down. Dar- 
ling then wriggled through to the 
one foot line but Middlebury stiT- 
ened and took the ball on downs. 
They kicked to Aggie on the 25 yard 
line where a forward pass went to 
Middlebury. A forward pass failed 
to gain and a buck at center went 
for naught. 

SECOND QDAKTER. 

Middlebury essayed another pass 
that went outside, making it Aggie's 
ball on the 45 yard line. A line 
rush netted two yards and Prtlmer 
made first down. Whorf went 









a b 










Laird, E. L. King, F. D. Barnes, A. 
W. Bishop, B.L. Chisholm,C. H.Fer- 
nald, (*.A. Huntington, C.W. Moses, 
E. Selkregg, and D. Sherinyan. 

1917—W. Savllle, L. T. Buck- 
man, S. Chamberlain, W.G. Buchan- 
an, W. F. Rutter, F. W. Mayo, 
C. M. Stearns, E, Henderson, Boaz, 
E. Hitter, and 1 > Dinsmore. 

1918— H. K. Foster, W. T. Good- 
win, P, L. Kirkham, L. Tucker, R. 
W. Thorpe, L. W. Spaulding, H. 
Swift, R. W. Weeks, L. M. Van 
Alstyne and Richardson. 

Others who attended were 1 

A Farwell, ex-*17,andT»jbeU '14. 



SOPHOMORES. 

Puffer, 1 , 
Koger, f Ie 

Magelstein, 
Edwards, 



re, 



re 



Booth, Buck, Flagg, Ig 
Warren, / 
Everbeck, ( c 
Buck, Cotton, 1 
Booth, Latham, ) ■ 
Cotton, Hazelton, I . 
Dunn, Babbitt, I 
Dunn, Babbitt, l 
Irving, 1 

Mack, qb 
Korstrom, lhb 

Higginbotham, rhb 

Higgins, fb 

Score: Sophomores 30, Freshmen o. 
Touchdowm, Higginbotham, Rostrom, 
Mack. GoaU from touchdowns, Warren 
2. Referee, Chapman. Umpire, Meli- 
can. Head linesman. Darling. Time, 
10 and 12 minute quarters. 



rt, Holmes 

rg, Roberts 
I Tilton 
c ' J Boyd 

,c 'l Capen 
It, Sedgwick 

Ie, McKee 

qb, Grayson 

rhb, Maginnis 

rkh 1 Hawley 

rnD 'l Hunnewell 

fb, Goodwin 



Dole, Center 



through tackle for two and Palmer 
hit center for four yards. Murphy 
failed to gain and a forward went 
to Middlebury. In two rushes they 
made first down and then Brehan 
made four yards more. A plunge 
at center failed to gain and a forward 
hit the ground, whereupon Middlebury 
parted to Murphy. Palmer made 
seven yards in two tries but Darling 
failed to gain so Palmer punted to 
Brehan who ran the ball back five 
yards. Middlebury was offside and 
lost five yards but won it back on a 
splendid forward ptss netting 20 
yards. A line plunge was good for 
five but a forward pass failed . Aggie 
lost five yards for offside playing 
and Middlebury essayed a forward 
pass. It landed in Darling's arm* 
on the 13 yard line and he raced for 
the Middlebury goal 87 yards away. 
Some of the would-be tacklers he 
dodged, others were spilled by splen- 
did interference and the rest were 
shaken off nntil he planted the pig- 
skin squarely behind the goal post*. 
Palmer kicked the goal. Middlebury 
kicked off and the half ended after 
several attempted forward passes. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 10, 1914. 



THIRD QDARTF.R. 

Palmer kicked off to Middlebury 
on her 2/i yard line. Brehan made 
eight yards and another rush uetted 
first down. Aggie was offBide and 
Middlebury made two at tackle but 
was thrown back at center. Three 
yards at guard and an offside by Aggie 
netted first down. Middlebury made 
eight yards and then first down. 
Middlebury was thrown for a loss 
but made first down on the next play. 
Two small gains and a forward was 
caught by Palmer. Two line plunges 
netted only four yards and George 
kicked. Middlebury made first 
down in four plays. After three 
attempts at Aggie's line time was 
called. 

FODRTH QD.4RTF.lt. 

Middlebury punted to Aggie on 
her 40 yard line. Five yards at 
guard and a forward failed. On the 
nest play a forward went to Mid- 
dlebury. No gain at center and a 
forward pass went to Darling. On 
the next play he made 20 yards. 
Palmer failed to gain but Whorf 
made five, being laid out and re- 
moved from the game, I oles taking 
his place. Aggie made four yards 
and Darling made first down. Boles 
got a yard, Darling five and Palmer 
failed to advance. A forward pass 
failed to work and the ball went to 
Muldlebury. A beautiful pass put 




Ig, Fish 

ll, Calmer 
. I Hawkes 
le, i Hard 

^M Hubbard 

rhb, Lamere 

lhb, Brehan 

fb, Lynch 



PAUtia, Halfback 

the ball at mid-field but three others 
wen unsuccessful and Palmer caught 
the fourth to end the game. The 
summary ; 



MASSACHUSETTS. 

Brooks. { . 
Williams, S ,e « 
PI listed, ( ., 
Ferry, { "• 

Bannister, Ig 
Dole, c 



MiniiLEBURV. 

I Cowles 
'• ) Jones 

ct, Reynolds 

rg, Horsford 
c, Lang 



1'erry, ( 
Verbeck, J g ' 
Danforth, rt 

Day, re 

Grayson. / . 
Murphy, i qD 
Palme r, Ihh 
Darling, rhb 
Whorf, I ,. 
Boles, ( ID 

Score — Massachusetts 7, Middlebury o. 
Touchdown — Darling. Goal from touch- 
down—Palmer. Referee— Hubbard of 
Amherst. Umpire— Peugh of German- 
town academy. Linesman— Chapman 
Time — la-minute quarters. 

COMMUNICATION 

(Communications to the Signal concerning 
matters of general interest are welcomed '1 he 
Signal is not to be held responsible for the 
opinions thus expressed.) 

Lawrence, Kansas, Oct. 24, 11M4. 
Editor of the Mass., Coujeqiam : 

Ever since I left Aggie I huve 
wished and intended to seud some 
word to the friends I had to leave, 
in a way that could reach them all. 
During the summer I received a call 
to my Alma Mater, the University of 
Kansas, which for the sake of rela- 
tives it seemed best to accept. Aggie 
had let out and I could see only a 
few of the boys to tell them I was 
leaving. 1 did work out on a to- 
bacco farm with Dan Lewis for over 
two weeks while the folks on the 
farm though 1 was a Junior in tin- 
college and called me "Bill." 

Now, since I have been in my 
Alma Mater after three year's ab- 
sence, 1 find it not easy to adjust 
myself entirely to the new conditions, 
eveu though there are over twenty- 
sis hundred in the student hod v. 
many of whom I already know. I 
have caught myself many times tell- 
ing of what "we did buck home," 
meaning Aggie. One could not km >\\ 
the men as I was privileged to 
know them and not timl it hard to 
leave. I think my decision to leave 
Aggie was the hardest one I evet had 
to make. I do not feel, however, 
that I have left Aggie. I want my 
friends back there to remember me 
and to know that I am coining back 
to visit the college as soon as I can, 
possibly next Commencement, for 
my work here is finished two weeks 
ahead of yours. 

I also want Aggie to beat in the 
Springfield game this fall. I have a 
bet up with a .Springfield Training 
School man, named Lorenz, that the 
loser has to furnish a dinner, nnd I 
don't want to do it. As I know most 
of our men on the team, I am sure 
they will do their best to keep me 
from paying for that dinner. And 
I wan't to say to every person I know 
at Aggie that when he comes to 
Kansas, I want him to hunt me np 
at Lawrence without fall. If I can 
get any man work here in the Agri- 
cultural College, the University, or 
the harvest fields, I want him to let 
me know, as I have a good many 
friends out here all over the big state 
I hope the men will now have my ad- 
dress and write me all the news— 
the Cot.lkoian is good, but it isn't 
enough. With all good wishes. 

With all good wishes, 

WlLLAMD WATTLES. 



DR. R. C. 

Dentist 

NASH'S BLOCK 

Evenings by Appointment, 



LAUKOVIT35 

Taii.ok ami Pki-sm k. 

Oents' Furnishings Dress Suits to 

Kent- Drill Qloves and Collars 

TicxhT Sweat*. 
11 Amity .«-»i. 1 *!•<»■ i«> 



High Grade Furnishings 




© \ 11 k. <•.... iom 



Travel the country over .uul you'll not 
find a choicer or a better line of Men's 
Toggery than you'll find ti^ht here. 

The best shirt makers, underwear 
makers, scarf makers and ^love 
makers send us these productions. 

The Best in Every Line 
is Here. 

Then again, we are not high priced. 
All ihe patrons of this store know 
this to be a fact. Test us and see. 

See our new Manhattan tnd Monarch 
Shirts, $1.50 to $2.50. 

Look at our <', loves, $1.00 '<» $2.50. 
Sec "in Neckwear, 25c to $1.50. 



Two Hundred Mackinaw* Now Ready for Your Inspection. 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 

v uilicrMt 



NOTICB ! 

Twenty-five cents will be put in a box for tbe 
NEW ATHLETIC FIELD every lime you 
buy shoes at our store costing $3.50 or over. 

VEKV LATEST STVLKR - 

Shoes for the Drill- 12.50 to $5.00 



Pou:e\s Shoe Store 



School and College Photographers . . • 




LOCALLY: 5* Center St., Northampton Mass., 

and South Had ley, Mass. 



Maim Office: 

»S46-»54 8 Broadway, 

New York City 



These Studios offer the beirt skilled 
artists and most complete 

equipment obtainable 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



-DEALERS IN« 









Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 



. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. io, 1914 



TflE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS 

Editor-in-Chief 

Managing Editor 

Assistant Editor 

Athletic Editor 

Athletic Editor 



FRANK W. BUEI.L 'i?, 
TYLER S. ROGERS'i6, 
HENRY H. WHITE '.5. 
JAMES A. PR1CE*I5. 
E. SUMNER DRAPER '15. 



THOS.L. HARROf'K^ 'i6. Department Editor 
ALFRED A. GIOIOSA 'i6. Campus Editor 
FRANK A. SCHEUFKLE, Alumni Editor 

MILFORD R. LAWRENCE'17. 

Associate Editor 

RICHARD W. SMITH '17, Associate Editor 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

MAURICE J. CLOUGH '15, Rusiness Manager 
CHAS A. HUNTINGTON. JR. '16, 

Assistant Business Manager 
W. RICHARD .SEARS '15. Advertising Man'g'r 
LESTER E. FIELDING '16. Ass't Adv. Mgr. 
BIRGER R. ROSEQUIS I '17, Circulation 



Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable 
to Maurice J. CLOUGH. 

Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Peer Offle*. 



Vol. XXV. Tuesday, Nov.'io. No. 9 

We desire to draw attention to the 
football edition of the COU.EOIAV. 
Owing to the lack of space it is 
impossible to run the cuts of all 
the team. The individual cuts are 
chosen at random as the teamwork 
shown this year has not given rise to 
any one or two stars but a united 
team that arc all playing together. 



Tin 1:1 was a g<K>d deal of spirit 
shown eventually by the student 
body in regard to the Tufts game. 
We know that the same spirit will be 
shown at the Springfield game for 
practically everyone attends that 
game. So nothing further need be 
said in this respect, excepting to 
have as many men as possible make 
usr of the special ami save them- 
selves money in addition to making a 
good showing in the parade in 
Springfield. 

Last Saturday. boVCTCf, along the 
side lines there was one thing very 
evident and that was the weakne« 
in singing. There is the volume and 
the enthusiasm but there seem* to be 
a lack of thinking in regard to the 
fundamental principle of keeping 
together on the songs. Heard on 
the other side of the field the singing 
Saturday was very ragged, one part 
being almost a whole line behind the 
other part of the section. There is 
just one remedy for this raggedness 
and that is to pay strict attention to 
the leader. Start with him and fol- 
low him throughout the entire song . 
If you are paving attention it is easy 
to keep the time. So, then, let as 
bear this in mind and make the best 
showing so far at Springfield on Sat- 
urday in supporting that team. 

The increasing interest that is be- 
ing shown th'w vear in dramatics is 
an exceedingly favorable sign. More 
people than ever are out for the 
caste, and it Is evident that the 
Holster Bolsters will be able to pre- 
sent a number of irst-rate plays dur- 



ing the course of the winter. 

But in the meanwhile, how about 
college debating? What is the de- 
bating club doing? What progress 
has been made with the interclaBS de- 
bates? Debating is just as import- 
ant as any of the other activities, 
and there are some educators who 
assert that forensic argument offers 
the best possible method of develop- 
ing one's mental powers. The fac- 
ulty of self-control can be strength- 
ened in no better way than through 
debating: and Lincoln Steffens is 
authority for the statement that self- 
control is the final and only end of 
education. 

Our debating club, it appears, is 
defunct. There are still some feeble 
evidences of life in the preparations 
for interclass debates, but the rigor 
mortis has set in and at the present 
rate it will not be long before our 
college debating will be totally 
extinct. 

Who is to blame for this state of 
affairs? Certainly not the faculty, 
for the English department stands 
ever ready to lend a helping hand. 
In the final analysis, it is evident 
that the student body as a whole is 
culpable. There isn't enough inter- 
est shown in debating, there isn't 
enough support given to the debat- 
ers. If the whole college turned out 
to witness forensic encounters, there 
wouldn't be auy lack of aspirants for 
debating honors. Moral backing is 
all that is needed— given that, the 
talent will take care of itself. 



SH6LLS 

Plenty of them. 

12, 16 and 20 Gage 

Almost anything you want in size of shot. 

Black or Smokeless Powder 

Guns to Let by the Day 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. io, 1914. 



HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The REXALL Store on the Corner 



(JNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

REGULAR SUNDAY SERVICE ATI P M. 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 



E. RUSSELL NORTON 



SALES AGENT 



MODERN REPAIR DEPT. 



E.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOF.MAN 



It has been the policy of the board 
of editors of the Collegian to omit 
all resolutions, whether class, frater- 
nity or otherwise, that are offered on 
the death of a relative of a member 
of that fraternity or class. Due to 
the list that it would be necessary to 
print if this rule was not in force the 
board has decided to publish resolu- 
tions only when they are offered for 
the decease of a member of a frater- 
nity, class or other organization. 



Davenport Miller 
Vein Coal 

Best Quality Pennsylvania Coal 



BOSTON OFFICE 
85 Water St. 



NEW YORK OFFICE 

1 Broadway 



E. E. MILLETT 

JEWELER and OPTOMETRIST 

Lenses ground while you wait 

College Jewelry 

Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and Guitar Strings 

AM HI- l« xT. MASS. 

Next to Post Office. 



Amherst 



CO • OP LAUNDRY 



The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

Jobbers of Wrought Iron and Brass Pipe, Valves 
ind Fittings for Steam, Water anil Gas, Asbestos 
and Magnesia Boiler and Pipe Coverings, Pipe 
Cut to Sketch, Mill Supplies. Engineers and 
Contractors for Steam and Hot Water Heating, 
Automatic Sprinkler Systems, Boiler and Engire 
Connections. - • Holyoke, Mass. 



I*«**tv«-«i fox* 



BECKMAN 



♦• hi > 



LOW PRICE T • ILORING CO. 

SUMS MADE TO ORDEK 
Suits Cleaned, Pressed and lived All kinds of 
Kepairihg for Ladies and Gentlemen neatly done. 
Mian-grade work by first class tailor. Work 
calledfor and delivered. *ell tickets for pressing. 
4 suits fur Si.;o 

GEORGE KOTOWITZ, Prop. 

Main Street. Amherst. Mass. Nash Ulock 

On your way to the Post Office Tel. 438 W 



FLEMINGS SHOE STORE 



Northampton 



For particular people 

THE ELMS RESTAURANT 

213 Main St., Northampton 

(Near Aniheist c;u linel 



* Quality Re^urant at Moderate 
Prices. 



Nov. 15, 

9-15 ,\. m. — Sunday chapel. Rev. 
K. B. Robinson, Grace 
church, Holyoke. 
Nov. 17. 

.*)-00 r*. m. — Senior class sing in 
chapel. 

6-80 p. m,— War lecture by Profes- 
sor Sprague. 

7-00 p. M. — Stockbridge club in So. 
College. 

7-30 p. m — Glee club rehearsal in 
chapel. 

liible class at Dr. Cham- 
berlain's home. 
Nov. 18. 

1-10 p. m.— Assembly. Mr. W. J. 
Campbell. Y. M. C. A. 
College, Springfield. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 



Mr. Campion has just returned from England with the 

AQUASCUTUM 

OVERCOATS 

Wells-Margetson Neckwear, Caps & Knitted Vests 

On account of war it will not be possible to get any more of 
these goods, so an early inspection will be to your advantage. 




High-Grade College Work TRY QUR SPECIALS 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

[Notices for this eolumn should be dropped in 
the CoLt-EfJiAK Office or handed to Alfred A. 
Giwo»a*i6, on or brier* the Saturday preceding 
each issue. I 

Nov. 11. 

1-10 p. m.— Assembly, Phi Kappa 
Phi address, Profesaor 
Lewis Perry, principal of 
Phillips Kxrt .1 Academy. 

6-30 p. m. — Mass meeting io chapel. 
Boys' Club in Physical 
Director's office. 
Nov. 12. 

8-30 p. m.— Glee Club rehearsal la 
chapel. 

6-45 p. «.— M, A, C. C. A. in 
chapel. 

Nov. 13. 

6-30 p. m . M :i>s meeting in chapel, 

Nov. 14. 

11-00 a.m. — Special leaves for 

Springfield. 
3-80 r. m. — Football, Springfield Y. 
M. C. A. College in 
Springfield. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

CURRAN ft DYER, Prop*. 

Loose-Leaf Note Books and Fountain 
—Pens— 



Shirts, 
Collars, 
Cuffs, - 
Plain wash, 
Same, rough dry, 



10-15C 

2 I-2C 
2 1-2C 

48c per cloz. 
30c per doE. 



DRY CLEARING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, #1.50 a Suit 

R. T. FnosT,Agent; D. ShekinyaH, Asst. Agent 
Try our ticket system 

Put full mom and address on laundry 



Come to us for 



Fireplace Goods, Coat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 



And a la carte service. 

OYSTERS STEAKS CHOPS 
FRIED CHICKEN, ETC. 

Open 6 a. m. to 11 r. m. 

FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

drown by the Florlcultural Dept. 

We offer our surplus stock of cut 
flowers and plants at reasonable rates 
to students and faculty. This stock 
is grown in modern houses under 
ideal conditions. Roses, carnations, 
violets, chrysanthemums and sweet 
peas in season. 

QROWN ON THE CAMPUS 

Telephone SOO 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Everything in Photography 

Including Framing. 
Qood work speaks for Itself. 

Nash Block, Amherst, Mass. 



SUNDAY CHAPEL 

In his own original tiud interesting 
manner, Mr. Albert K. Roberts of 
of the International Y. M. C. A. 
gave a splendid talk 011 "The Abun- 
dant Life." Mr. Roberta policy is 
to be natural in his expression of 
Christian thought and it was his char- 
acteristic expression that fixed his 
message in every mind. 
In brief Mr. Robert! said : 
"I like the saying of .testis, — *I 
am coining that they might have life 
and have it abundantly.' and from it 
I shall take my theme : 'The Abun- 
dant Life.' There are four phases 
to my text. Brat, in order to get the 1 
abu.jdanee of life, we first must he 
loyal to our own ideals. We mint 
stand l»y our principle! not only when 
we are away from temptation, but 
when are subjected to the evil influ- 
ences of the 'grind. We all have 
ideals but to be trim to 0111 selves, we 
must never fail them. 

"A joyful life results from an 
abounding life. Religion makes us 
jovful, but few realize it. A solemn 
and sedate demeanor is not to be as- 
sociated with true religion, for true 
religion makes us strive for the hard- 
est things in life, and since we are 
satisfied that we are doing our best, 
we are joyful. Joy is the supreme 
factor in our lives and hence true 
religion is an essential for happy liv- 
ing. 
The life abundant is also eonta* 

gious. All who come in contact with 
it feel its influence and and our true 
character or that which *will wear in 
the dark,' is roost contagious of all. 
Furthermore, this life is efficient, — 
that is the ability to lay our lives be- 
side the other man on the road of 
the helpful. 

Therefore, we see that those who 
are successful in life, are those lead- 
ing abundant lives, those who are 
loyal to their ideals, who are joyful 
and efficient in their living, and who 
make their good living contagious." 



Fine Tailoring 



Men's Furnishings 



-5ee Our Agents- 



*10. — Raymond J. Fiske, with the 
TJ. S. Department of Agriculture, 
Bureau of Entomology, Grand Junc- 
tion, Colo., engaged in codling 
moth investigations. 



Hubbard's BasE Fertilizers 

the most economical you can use. 

BetteR crops 

B^RthlX£G&^ ;ue the inevi,able result - 

THE ROGERS « HUBBARD COMPANY, Middletown, Conn. 




• 'in.. ,in.l vt m l*». I'.iriliiinl, Conn. 



WJ 7 G are supplied every year 

Duroee s oeeds >r / n r A Pcri 

*^***r^ v fcr^^'^w can p i anters t h an are 
the seeds of any other growers. Do you know Burpee- 
Quality "Seeds that Grow" ? If not, we would like to 
make your acquaintance. Simply send us your address 
(a postal card will do) and you will receive Burpee's 
Annual for 1914, — a bright new book of 182 pages, which 
is recognized as "The Leading American Seed Catalog." 
Kindly write to-day! Address 

W. ATLEE B URPEE & CO., Burpee Buildings, Philadelphia 

\S ^ m _ _ _ ■ _ — — . ■ , =■ 



n 



F. A. S 




MEN'S 



Use our new cash discount card 

AND SAVE FIVE PER CENT ON 

SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING 

Furnishings and Custom Tailoring 



C&rpfrvUr & Morehouse, 
PRIfiTCnSi 



No. i, Cook Place, 



Amherst, M 






1 






The MassachusettsJjCollegian, Tuesday, Nov. 10, 191 4. 



JORDAN MARSH COMPANY 

Bo ston 

TWO GREAT nCIUHVOS— OVKU. 1.000,000 SQUARE FEET 
OF FLOOR SIWCK — 169 SKPARATF. SELLING SECTIONS. 

For Room Furnishings, Wearing Apparel, Unique and 
Practical Articles for Gifts- in fact each of the thousand 
and one things student life calls for this store is the logi- 
cal shopping place for the college men of New England. 

Our Clothing :ni(l Furnishings Store is just a step from 
Summer Street. D<> nol fail t<> vi»it when you are in Boston. 
It is filled with just the kind ol toggery young men like. 

All Purchases delivered FREE to Amherst 
,]/,/// Orders fiven prompt attention. 



COLLEGIAN COMPETITION 

Tbe following is the standing of 
the competition for the editorial 
board of the Collegian : 



1916. 



O'ltrien. 
Humes, 



9.2 

9.1 



THh 

Hoover & Smith Co. 

616 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 

Diamond Merchants 

Philadelphia's Official Fraternity Jeweler 

SPKOIALIBTS IN 

Fraternity Badges, Fobs, Novelties. 
Kings. Charms Prizes Trophies. 

Medals. .... College Pins. Fobs. Seals, 
Rings, Charms 



S. S. HYDE 

JLWhLLk & OPTICIAN 

No* at ij Hlea»*nt M 
Ocu'istt* I'ii'hih tious I illt-d- ll'oken lenses 

.wcur.itfl) Replaced, I in* W itch Kepatring 
Promptly iticl -kilfulh D«>n«-. 

•»atisi <.ti"n i,u..<.mierd 



Batchelder & Snyder Co. 

e\«"KKit«. imiL'I.tio UHi STICKS 

I S\\ Itl 1 I Ki. >l IhKllv 

WHOLCSaLK pivIIks in 

lleet. Mutton, Lamb, Veal, Pork, Lard, Hams, 

rUcon. Sausages, Poultry, tiame. Hutter 

cheese, hgtrs. Beans. 

n ! 1c >c ,'-* . t.^s.,7.,Q. it & c] B<*ck4tOAt> 54 

Umim Picking I .»u -.«*. Brighton, Mass. 

S in ■• Phi trv l>rei.|>i« Plant, Bo»tnn. 

fir* merle-, in Vermont 



"SCOTTIE" 
H. HOOPER 

Will 1 lean and BTrwt your cloth.* so you 

will be Mttsfted. It rontli no more 

and he i.» nearer to "Aggie." 

I.IHMIAI. TltKCT lYSTKM 

Under Columbia Cafe 



'BIDE- A- WEE" 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles 

elm Specialty- And othei »^ « > • >• 1 thing* to eat. 

MK>. I.. M. 5TBBB4NS, 

Mwldl. Mud, Hartley, Mass, 

let. HS-W 



E. B. DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

I »l. NT A L ROOMS 

Will amx Hint k. Amher*t, Mi 1 

Office Hours 9 la ii« m . 1 c to 5 r. M. 



-I HAM KI I II.NG 
.^- H II IM, 1 IWISti 



Telephone W— r< 



P. W. D tNCE & CO., Plumbers 

jH-tialt< of Kep-.ilrinK 

I lll'Ki H \\ IM-.iWs, ViKMiiKIAL 
WlMinW., I »• <(> I K.HTS. &C. 

Cli»»on \ V f 1MHHIST, MASS, 

TH8 TBWI'WY I'AKLOB 

• 1, tuoiiiK I r>'Hp>liii{ |:> ptOrini: 
l nil, !<»•■» t wriiir. It- -1 M •• • U I • >»• .1 t rl«-*> 

All woik carefully done Work called for ami 
delivered. lieMi' efPfCMt*, Milt*, pint* and 
coats. I^dn*** Hn» I»n»« ««it» a «i»ri»Hv. 
T«bm will call every day al VI, A < 

Hit. Kit AMi. I IN. Ir„|, 

Rear Naah Bl'k. Amherst. Tel. No u»» 



Huntington Ave., Exeter and Blagden Sts., Boston, Mass. 

Headquarters for College Men when in tbe chy. 

AMO« M. WM If MM f I'M. .1 ■ 

Now is the time to be planning for 

Fraternity Groups 

—Have them taken at— — 



CROSS COUNTRY RUN 

Starting from the Drill hull, Rich- 
ards easily led the cross eon nt ry 
team lo victory over ;i ililliciilt course 

in the exceptional time of '27 minutes. 

7 BeoOQd* tin Satin <l.i v afternoon. 
Aiken end Coiej followed in second 

and third plaeea respectively. M. A. 

C.*e next man to place \v:is 1'nitt in 

sixth and ilien Russell in the ninth 
position. Worcester "Tech" men 

gathered fourth, fifth, seventh and 
eighth places, giving them thirty-five 
point-, ns against the twenty-one to 
the credit <»f M. A. ('. 

During the first part of the cue 

Worcester • -Tech" led but tbe gruel- 
ling hills and rough footing soon told 
on them so Unit Ricluuds. Aiken and 
Colev were able to take the lead as 
in the class cross country smd finish 
with a good margin at the tape 

The course, starting at the Drill 
hull, passed by (lark Hall over 
l'rexy's Hill to I<over*B Ltine nearly 
to the Kxpci imeiit Station, from there 
to Hast Pleasant street, tlown tbnt 
street to Triangle, down Triangle to 
Fearing and Lincoln avenue and the 
Drill ball. 

Tbe order in finishing of the first 
ten men was: Richards. M. A. C ; 
Aiken, M. A. C. ; Coley. M. A. C. ; 
Fraucis. W. P. I. ; Gerald, W. P. I. ; 
Pratt, M A. ( .; Smith, W. P. I.; 
Wood. W. P. I.; Ruesell, M. A. ('. ; 
Clover, M. A. (*. 



1917. 

Bonn, 8.f> 

Saville, 7.0 

Dizer, 8.9 

Mayo, 8.5 

Rogers, 8.6 

Henderson, 3.1 

(Jiiimby, 2.C 

191*. 
Willoiighby, 10.7 

Jones, H. K. 10.0 

Lamphear, 1 . 1 

Messenger, .7 

Ingalls, ,n 

The work of the competitors has 
been of a fairly high standard, and 
considerable good material has been 
banded in. Credit is given to can- 
didates for all assigned work and 
any other unassigned work that could 
fie printed. Office work such as 
proof reading is also credited. 

All material submitted must be 
written in ink on one side of the 
paper and tin- number <>f north t"?* the 
artiWs noted. 



MISS McCLELLAN'S STUDIO 



44 State Street, 



Northampton, Mast 



HIHETEEH-THIRTEEN NOTES 

Samuel F. Huntington, farm man- 
ager, Grand Isle, Vt. 

Carl A.Shute,fsrmer,Kasthampton. 
They say that **Plupy" it threatening 
to get married the uight of the Spring- 
field game. (Unofflcla.l) 

"Norm" Clark, "Nubble" Adams, 
"Bill" llaaev, Paul Kerex and 
George Zabrlsk! were at the Mid- 
dleliiirv game. 

Be at tbe Springfield game ! 



JrTOCKBRIDGE CLUB 

At ■ meeting of the animal hus- 
bandry section of the Stock bridge 
(lull lost Tuesday evening, the three 
men who took part in tire ( hicngo 
stock judging contest gave an 
account of ihetr experiences. Moberg 
was the first speaker, describing the 
trip out west aud the firat day at the 
exposition. Whitinore and Harvey 
followed with interesting reports of 
the contest. The 4H competitors — 
three from each of 16 colleges aud 
secondary schools of agriculture — 
were divided into four groups, no 
group containing more than one rep- 
resentative from the same team. 
Each gioup was allowed fifteen min- 
utes for judging cows, fifteen for 
judging bulls, and then fifteen more 
for writing up notes. This was 
repeated three limes for each of the 
three different classes of stock on 
exhibition, and the notes were then 
banded in to be passed on by profes- 
sional judges. After the amateur 
contests, there was a session of ex- 
pert judging by professionals, and 
this was perhaps the most interesting 
and instructive feature of the whole 
affair.* The next contest is some- 
thing to be looked forward to, by I 
those who contemplate trying out. 
for next year's team. 



The Commons club has taken the 
following men into its organization : 
Isaac B. Simon *15, Francis M. An- 
drews '16, Ravmond L. Clapp' U . 
Albert J. Hicks' 16, Walter G. Bu-i 
cbanan *17, .lohn T. Dizer '17. Ed- 
ward S Duffill '17, Howard C. GrotT, 
*17, Richmond M. Jackson *17, Her 
man B. Nash M7, Walter F. Ruttirj 
'17, Harry L, Saidel '17, George 1* 
Sargent **17, James J. Warren '17, 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. io, 19 14. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

The annual bulletin of the Experi- 
ment Station on the subject of Food 
inspection has been received from 
ne printer, and will be sent out Im- 
mediately. The edition consists of 
18,000 copies, and appears as "Con- 
trol Bulletin, No. 1." This new 
H-ries, comprising both feed and fer- 
tilizer reports, will be independent of 
other bulletins issued by the Station, 
as the old system of numbering all 
bulletins consecutively, without re- 
spect to the subject matter, has 
proved unsatisfactory. The manu- 
script for tbe Fertilizer Inspection 
bulletin is now nearly completed, and 
will be sent to the state printers 
within a short time. It will appear 
as Control Bulletin No. 2. 

Typewritten copies of U. S. 
Department of Agriculture bulletins 
before the printed matter appears 
are on file in the library. Students 
majoring in rural sociology or eco- 
nomic courses will find these first 
draft copy materials valuable for 
their work. The writings are classi- 
fied under heads like these : econom- 



FOR GOOD "EATS" 



to- 



16 PLEASANT ST. 



Mrs. J. K. W. Davenport 



hotel Ularrcn 

South Deerficld, Mass. 

T. J. AHERN, MANAGER 



61 LAVAL 

Cream Separators 

Make Fall and Winter 
Dairying More Profitable 

THERE are special advantages in u»ing a 
good cream separator during the fall 
and winter months 
The milk from cows long In lactation is 
hardest to cream— and likewise hardest to 
•eparate with an inferior separator. 

Moreover, cream and butter prices are 
highest, so that the waste of gravity setting 
(H a poor separator counts lor most. 

I hen there's the sweet, waim skim-milk for 
ck feeding, alone worth the cost of a sepa- 
rator in cold weather. 

There is surely no reason to delay the pvr- 
I chaw of a separator or to continue the use of 
I an inferior one. 

Vou can't afford to 
wait until next spring. 
Let the De Laval start 
saving cream for yon 
right now and it will 
earn its cost by spring. 
See the nearest 
De Laval agent at 
once, or if yon do 
not knew hiii . write 
us direct for any de- 
sired information. 

THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR CO. 

■a F Madison St. 

CHtCAOO 




!•*§ Broadway 
■EWYomt 



ics, eutomology, rural credit, medi- 
cine, etc. Mr. Green and his assist- 
ants will gladly give searchers all 
help possible. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

The climax of perfection in tbe de- 
velopment of state expositions will 
be attained when the 122 acre East- 
ern States Exposition at Springfield 
— under the supervision of the Spring- 
field Board of Trade — is completed. 
The grounds for the exposition are 
situated on a brunch of tlie Connecti- 
cut river, and so located that the ex- 
position will have a population of 
almost 3,01)0,000 people from which 
to draw its patronage. All of the 
main exposition buildings, such as 
the agricultural building, horticul- 
tural building, dairy building, state 
institutions building, government and 
entomological laboratories, etc., are 
to be of a permanent type of con- 
struction. Fart of the exposition 
grounds will be set aside for football 
and baseball grounds, circus grounds, 
sales exchange for horses, etc. 
There are some thirty shite fair 
grounds of like nature in the United 
States, but the Eastern States expo- 
sition will be of broader scope than 
any. The board of directors will 
include a representative of every New 
England state aud New York stale. 
The exposition will open in the fall 
of 1915 with temporary buildings. 
until the permanent buildings are 
erected, and will be continuous. Mr. 
A. D. Taylor '05 of Cleveland and 
Boston has been selected to do the 
landscape planning, and will have 
charge of the carrying out of the 
landscape development of the exposi- 
tion grounds. Mr, Taylor has been 
in business for himself since April, 
1014, and since that time has been 
connected with much important land- 
scape work, including the following : 
The Lock Haven subdivision of high 
class residential development in Nor- 
folk, Virginia ; the New Jersey State 
Agricultural College; Ohio State 
Normal School ; Ohio State Univer- 
sity ; Detroit City Development and 
Planning Work, and a large number 
of private estates, both in the Ei*t 
and in tin; West. 

'09.— David Curran, 27 years old, 
son of Mr. and Mrs, Timothy L'urran 
of 299 Church street, MarltMirough, 
died Wednesday, Nov. Ith, of 
Typhoid pneumonia. "Duke" as he 
was familiarly known was engaged 
as civil engineer in construction work . 

'12.— Miss Clara Vilena Farr and 
Herman Chester Walker of Provi- 
dence, R., were married Saturday 
evening. (Jet. 31. The ceremony 
was performed at 7-80 by Rev, Robert 
Russell Wicks, pastor of the Second 
Congregational church. Mr. aud 
Mrs. Walker left Saturday evening 
for a three weeks' wedding trip aim 
on their return will live with the 
bride's mother on Washington 
avenue. Miss Farr is the daughter 
of D, L, Fan, one of Holvoke's 
former mayors. The groom is em- 
ployed as a forester, being connected 
with the Walker forestry company in 
Providence, R. I., and Springfield. 



Cbc Pheasant 

BmttE St., Bmberet 

Breakfast. Luncheon, 
Afternoon Tea. 

Dinner if arranged for. 
Telephone 470 

Rooms for Transients, 

theTeachers Exchange 




An Especially Uood Commission Proposition— 

Cash fin test nuk-is — Article widely Ailvertistd — 
Cuts iIomii i-xeense in Bowfi 1 wnts— -Addryi! 
KNi.lNhi [RING >i I'i'l.V Co., 2*$ N. gth Street, 
Philadelphia, IV 



Of Bsttoti 



120 Boylston St. 



Recommends Teachers, Tutors and Schools 



• They're not short-lived 

The Jerseys 




In 1013 elintern Jersey 

co-vs were oli.na.iy tested 

v '.iuli ;iv ".ij d 12 years 

b id * ti' in > 01 n-». Their 

in Ik 1 luihit-tieu 

is . 1 n», tnd*. A vit.ikc 

.;i ■ . i" pi unds. One 

1 ft was ovur 18 



-rnmmic 



hmen 
I'rotlui 



THE AVVRn . . m hi t IIIC CLUB 

S.t W. •- .: ! I,, T..w iw'„ C ay 



Mc3PRffS~5» 



NON-LEAK ABLE 



FOUNTAIN PEN 
Minimize your fountain pen 

troubles by owning a Moore's. 4! It is the 
safest, soundest and most dependable pen known. 
C Its strength lies in its very simplicity. Nothing 
fin iky to get out of order. 41. Vou can give your- 
self no better treat than a Moore's Non-leakable. 

For Sale by Dealer* Everywhere 

American Fountain Pen Company 

Adams, Cushlnft & Foster, Selling. ASenu 
DEVONSHIRE STREET :: :: BOSTON, MASS. 



ANS 

UP 



7\ 




E> Frank Coe Fertilizers 

1fiC7 THE BUSINESS FARMERS' STANDARD 1A14 
lOOf FOR OVER FIFTY-FIVE YEA R S 1 3lH 

Do You Raise 300 Bushes of Potatoes p*r Acre? 

HREE hundred bushels per acre is 
not an unusunl yield by any means, 
but did you get it this year ? 
•pf you were planning to raise 300 
bushels of potatoes to the acre how 
far apart would you space your rows? 

How far apart would you drop the seed pieces in 

the row? 

<JHow much fertilizer would you use to grow 300 
bushels of potatoes per acre? How would you 
apply It ? 

flAre you sure that your seed potatoes are true to 
name and true to type ? 

•JWhat are you doing to prevent "scab," and early 
and late blight ? 

(JDid you have a short crop of potatoes because of 
dry weather ? Have you decided how you will 
overcome this trouble in the future ? 

fJAIl the*e practical points, and many mure, are fully covered ain our 
new book 

"Potatoes: A Money Crop" 

which will he sent free to every potato grower who reque»fs a copy, and 

mentions this psper. 

S|I Ins book is written by ■ man who himself has had year* of experience at 

a potato grower, and who has made a careful study of the beat methods at 

other growers. 

<JM you read this book you will keep it for future reference. It is ■ "worth 

while" puhlicniion 

The Coe-Mortimer Company 

51 CHAMBERS STREET, NEW YORK CITY 



I 



r« 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 10, 1914- 



— JOIN THE BUNCH AT— 
EPSTEIN'S TAILORING PARLORS 

Now loc.itcl over post office. Up one flight 

Pressing and Cleaning a Specialty 

Liberal Ticktt System Tel. 36 M 

SHOE STORE 

Shoes Repaired by Machinery 

SHOE SHINE 

Open Sunday from 7-12. On your way to P. O. 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Offers courses of instruction in twenty eignt teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student .nay specialize in the following subjects: 



The Highland Hotel 

Corner ot Hillman and Barnes Streets, three 
blocks from the Union Depot. is a modern hos- 
telry run on the European flan. It is just .1 step 
from Main Street, away I r. 1 hi thenoUe and dust 
and yet in the center of the business district. 

Its rooms are well furnished and comfortable, 
having a telephone and hot and cold running 
water in every room. Prices •! and up; rooms 
with b.ith (single) SI.SO and up. 

Its excellent cuisine and well ventilated dining 
room makes a meal a pleasant memory— every- 
thniK of the highest quality, well cooked and 
served in the best possible manner. 

Stay at the Highland Hotel once and you will 
anticipate staying there again. Music every 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 



Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 

Agricultural Chemistry 



FOUNTAIN PENS 

Moore's Swan's 

Waterman's 

Thirty-six dozen pens to select from. 



OUR RULE 



evening. 



D. H. SIEVERS, 



HigliUiul Hutfl, 



Sprlllgtlelll, Mmk*. 



Agricultural Economics 

Rural Sociology 

Economic Entomology 

Microbiology 

Plant Physiology and Pathology 

Agricultural Education 

Rural Social Science 

For complete catalog and illustrated oooklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, PRESIDENT 

AMHERST. MASS. 



Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded." 



STUOEHTFORHIIWE 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

HERST FURNITURE 

AMD 

CARPET ROOMS 

E. L>. MARSH ESTATE 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 




Joiut Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics. 

M. A. C. Athletic Fio'd Association, 

The College Senate, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association. 

Hockey Association 

Tenuis Association, 

Rifle club. 

Roister Doisters J. P. Nicholson, 1 r 

Musical Association. 

Kinetoen Hundred Fifteen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Sixteen Index. 
It. A, C. Christian Association, 
M. A. C. Catholic Club, 
Fraternity Conference. 
Stockbridge Club, 



COX SONS 

— AND — 

VINING 

7*-14 Madison Avenue. New York 

CAPS AND GOWNS 

Best Material* and Workmanship 



Philip H. Smith, Secretary 
C. S. Hicks, Treasurer 
K. Towne, Piesident 
J. A. Price, Mauagcr 
S. Prouty, Manager 
E. F. Clark, Manager 
E. S. Diaper, Manager 
H. Bishop, Manager 
R. M. Upton, President 
odnciug and Business Manager 
F. A. Anderson, Manager 
H. M. Uogers, Mauager 
L. E. Fielding, Manager 
H. H. White, President 
.1. K. Harper, President 
F. W. Buell. President 
P. F. Whittnore, President 



K-.I»..I.I»»H. lHO'J 

BlBPBBH Lane FoiiOEH 

MANUrACrUHINO JBWBLKH 

180 BROADWAY. NEW VOKK 

oi.uii an 13 ooriiwi 

1»1NN AND KINOH * 

<».»!. l>. Mil VNR ANI> HK«NX» 



RAHAB'S INN 

Northampton. Massachusetts 
TWO BLOCKS FROM THR DErOT 

The hotel where there is comfort (with- 
out extravagance.) More popular 
than ever. 

Special Luncheon 12—1 P. M. 

PRIVATE DINING ROOMS 

A la Carte Service 
Prom 6 JO to II P. M. 



There are Seven Good Reasons whv youshould 
buy your 

COAL 

or 

C. R. ELDER 



WOODWARD'S 




Stationery, Newspapers, 
Magazines and Col- 
lege Supplies 

A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer. 



»7 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Mt.. alongside the 
famous Moody Brook battle ground 
to Old Oeerfield, thence to Green- 
field, Turners Falls and across the 
-Plains" to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 

50 Miles of Trackage - nodern 
Equipment Train Dispatch- 
ing System -Freight and Ex- 
press Service over entire line . 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
Company 



CARS 



Leave AOUIE COLLEOE lor MOL- 
YOKE at 15 mln. past the hour. 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST lor ACKUE COL-| 
LEOE at 7 end 27 mln . past the hour. 

Special Car* at Heasonahl. Rata* 



AMHERST & SUNDERLAND ST. Bt. CO 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 



M 



ICE CREUI 



CUted only from t A. M. to 4 A. M. 



For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of " Gold Medal Uniform!, " 

1434-1426 Oietfnut St.. rtitadelphia, F*. 



For a Dally and Sunday Newspapfj 
You should Read 

TttaS 

Springfield Republican 

While you are at college in Amherst. 

It hM all ef Til* M. A. C.Nfm 

The B*H Spattlas Jtawt 

roU 0»n»r*l H*wb 

A Strong editorial F«c« 

iBtorMtlng reotarea 

It »• • R**> New»pa|if r 

Daily, 3 cents •, 70 cents a month ; $i. 
S quarter. 

Sunday, % cents; so cents a quarter. 
Subscribe by mail of tbrojtth the Amherst N ' 






MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEO E 



Vol. XXV. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, November 17, 1914. 



No. 10 



HARD FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 
OF 7 GAMES NETS 2 WINS 



Injuries and Ineligibility of Varsity 

Material Handicaps Coach 

Bride's Team. 



PROFESSOR PERRY GIVES 

PHI KAPPA PHI ADDRESS 



Honorary Society Admits White, Stan- 
ford and Sauchelli in Annual 
Fall Election. 



This year's football schedule, the 
hardest that MAC. has had in 
many years results in two victories 
and five defeats with a score of 88 
points made against the home team 
and 36 scored by them. The diffi- 
cult schedule, coupled with several 
serious injuries to the team account 
for the apparently poor showing. 

The season began with the "big 
green" team, a serious proposition. 
The score of 29-6 against that team 
in the first game is entirely to our 
credit. At the Holy Cross game the 
Aggie team showed their superiority 
as with one exception their goal line 
was never in danger, while the Holy 
Cross team was continually on the 
defensive. The game was of the 
new style M. A. C. using the forward 
six times successfully and Holy Cross 
attempting it eight times, twice mak- 
ing them complete. In the Colgate 
game the team, rushed off of their 
feet by the speedy well balanced 
attack of their opponents, were 
beaten in the first quarter, tin- final 
score being 25-0. The Colgate team 
was heavy, their back field fast and 
their Btring of substitutes long, they 
nsed the old style of football almost 
exclusively. 

The Colby team, Maine champions, 
won from Aggie on a wet slippery 
field in a steady downpour by a tingle 
goal the score being 6-0. In tills 
game our attempted open plays 
proved to be unsuccessful and Colby 
outrushed the Massachusetts team 
making 16 first down to M. A. C.'s 
six. In the Tufts game the team 
worked as a unit and a wonderful 
defense was shown. Tufts won 
by one point on account of her goal 
from touchdown, the score being 7-6. 
M iddlebury whs expected to be easy 
meat bat they developed unexpected 
football abUity and the team was 
only able to beat them by a aeon of 
7-0. The line-up was in a large part 
second team men the first siring 
either being on the hospital list after 
the Tuft* game oi being aaved for 
the Springfield game. The game 
waa disappointing, the Middle bury 
, team dearly outplaying the home 
tesm. The team was perhaps a bit 
over confident after the wonderful 



FOURTH PUCE FOR AGGIE 
IN INTERCOLLEGIATE RACE 



Richards Sixth in Field of Fifty— 

Maine, M. I.T. and Dartmouth 

Take First Honors. 



Prof. Lewis Perry, principal of 
Phillips Exeter Academy, delivered 
the Phi Kappa Phi address before 
the student body at Wednesday's 
assembly in a very interesting man- 
ner. Professor Perry is a brother of 
last year's commencement speaker, 
Prof! Bliss Perry of Harvard Univer- 
sity. He said he had been told to 
speak on any subject be chose, and 
accordingly he would discuss "The 
Drama." He spoke in part as 
follows ; 

"Near the end of the sixteenth 
century, and at the beginning of the 
seventeenth, Shakespeare, Marlowe, 
and Ben Jonson were doing much 
to make the drama popular. A hun- 
dred years later, however, we find 
Wk BJefram *H***e- «my™g that a* 
that time the drama was a thing of 
the past. Goldsmith al»o declared 
that humor had vanished from the 
stage. Nevertheless the drama did 
have certain attractive characteris- 
tics, for the plays written In the sev- 
enteenth century are much read to- 
day. People who never go to the 
theater now-a-days read Shakes- 
peare's plays with much enjoyment 
and pleasure. It is an interesting 
fact that Shakespeare's dramas are 
played ten times in Germany to once 
in this country. 

"You Phi Kappa Phi men know 
that education is of a serious nature. 
Now the drama U Ju*t as serious as 
education, yet it ta said that we go 
to the theater for amusement alone. 
It is true that the drama must con- 
tain much to make us laugh, but it 
must have a serious side. By serious 
I do not mean gloomy, but it must 
be true to conditions aa found in 
every-day life. The play which 
merely make* aa laugh Isste but a 
season. It is well-koown that we do 
not remember the little incident* of 
out you* which may be amusing at 
the time as long as we remember the 
more serious and important happen- 
ings. A famous writer has made 
the statement that a play is not writ- 
ten, ft to pat together. The most 
successful plays of the last few years 
—The Bluebird, Chanticleer, The 
Piper— are all literary play*. 

It to the ability to pick out sig- 



TEAM HOLDS SPRINGFIELD 

TO 17-3 IN FINAL GAME 



Darling and Whorf Star in Line 

Plunging -Helican, Injured, Flays 

Part of Game. 



[Cpallaiioil »■ 



7J 



ul 



[Continued on page 6 1 



Running an excellent race, the 
Massachusetts Agricultural college 
cross country team placed fourth in a 
field of nine starters in the New Eng- 
land intercollegate championship 
cross country run at Boston Satur- 
day. Maine was the first, with M I. 
T. and Dartmouth the closest compet- 
itors that this run has ever devel- 
oped. Maine'a score was 66, while 
Tech's was 69 and that of Dartmouth 
was 74. Massachusetts' score totaled 
11/i. Preti of Maine was the indi- 
vidual winner in the fast time of Ifi 
minutes 15 8-5 seconds, being closely 
followed to the tape by Shriver of 
Williams. The first M. A, C. man 
to finish was Richards in sixth place 
and Captain Aiken landed eighth. 
The other Agfgte men to total in »he 
scoring were Pratt 16, Glover 38, 
Russel 4i. Coley, who hort one 
ankle a week ago, iujured the other 
one in the course of the race and 
had to withdraw. 

All of the teams went off fast at 
the start and stayed well bunched at 
the mile mark. At this point Fran- 
cis of Worcester Tech was in the 
lead with Preti and Bell of Maine, 
Shriver of Williams, Wan* of Colby, 
Cook and Brown of M. I. T. at hie 
heels. A stiff wind waa blowing in 
the faces of the runners and at this 
point the men began to string out. 
At the end of toe second mile Fran- 
cis had dropped back but the others 
remained in about the same position. 
The Dartmouth team, which had 
started off well bunched, led by Cap- 
tain Durgio, were running strong at 
this point. At the end of ttw first 
Up PreU, Brown and Shriver were 
running well together with Cook and 
Wen* right behind. Preti and 
Brown opened up a lead on the sec- 
ond lap with the other men well 

stump OUt. 

Half a mile from the finish Brown 
weakened and was passed by eight 
others having to be content with 
ninth place. Shriver, Bell and Cook 
struck the finish together and they 
crossed the tape in the order named. 
Richards of M. A. C. and Dempsey of 
Maine bad a hard battle for sixth 
place but the former waa the 
stronger and won. Aiken nosed out 

[Coolinyad on page ; | 



Playing a game that the people of 
Springfield declared the best staged 
on Pratt field this season, the M. A. 
C. football team was defeated by 
Springfield Y. M. C. A. College 17 to 
3. Palmer's successful drop kick 
averting the third shut out in as many 
years. 

The game was an example of clean, 
haid playing and good sportsmanship 
which further emphasized the fine 
spirit and good feeling existing 
between the colleges, old rivals for 
years. Every quarter not only furn- 
ished a score of some kind, but also 
a string of spectacular plays that will 
never be forgotten by the 3000 
spectators at the game. Those long, 
twisting end runs by Springfield 
b**»k«l hv wonderful interference 
were atone responsible for Aggie's 
defeat. On the other hand, Captain 
Melican's team used the Minnesota 
shift to such advantage that a touch- 
down seemed imminent at times, but 
when chances were brightest, over- 
eagerness lost the day through fum- 
bling or penalties for off-side play. 
These were not the only handicaps, 
for Capt. Melican played nearly two 
periods with his recently broken col- 
lar bone protected by a plaster caat, 
and when it waa necessary to take 
him out Murphy, the sub-quarter, 
waa knocked out after being in the 
game for a short time, and had to be 
carried from the playing field. Yet, 
with all these drawbacks the team 
made a wonderful showing. 

For Aggie "Bed" Darling was 
easily the star of the contest, making 
substantial gaina on aU of bis 31 
rushes except two, while on the defen- 
sive, he was in almost every play. 
The work of Day waa sensational at 
times, for twice he threw the speedy 
half-hacks for twelve yard lose*, and 
broke up other plays before they were 
even etnrted. Whorf, on line plung- 
ing, showed up well in the "pinch." 
Praise is due to the whole line in 
large measure, for evety own fought 
haid and opened up the holes that 
made the work of the baokfleld stand 
out so conspicuously' For Spring- 
field, Fountain and WUHams excelled 
with their spectacular end runs. 
Miller's punting and rushing was also 
of a hlg* order, while Capt. Bell and 






The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 17, 1914. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 17. '9'4- 



i 

1 



Gibson excelled for the defense. 

The game in detail : 

Aggie won the toss, and chose to 
defend the north goal. Springfield 
kicked off and Darling ran the ball 
back 10 yards. Outhe next play, he 
made 5 yards and Whorf made first 
down through center. After three 
short gains at tackle, Palmer punted 
to Miller, On three plays, Spring- 
field advanced the ball twenty yards 
only to lose it on a fumble. After 
three tries through the line, Palmer 
attempted a drop-kick but failed. 
The ball was put in scrimmage on the 
20-yard line. Springfield punted to 
Darting on the 35-yard line. After 
7 yards gaining on 3 rushes, Palmer 
was forced to punt because of a pen- 
alty. Miller ran the ball back 30 
yards and was only stopped by ('apt. 
Melican on the 25~yud Hue. On the 
next play Fountain made one of his 
beautiful end runs for a touchdown. 
Merill kicked the goal. Plaisted got 
the kick-off anil ran the ball back 15 
yards. Darling made 5 yards at left 
tackle, Palmer hit center for 3, and 
Darling made another yard, but Meli- 
can's dash through center was all in 
vain as the team was off-side, forcing 
Palmer to punt. After three short 
gains, Miller kicked out of bounds at 
mid-field. Darling and Whorf made 
two small gains and Palmer punted. 
It was blocked and Gibson recovered 



it. Fountain tore off 20 yards around 
right end, but after Williams had 
made 8 yards at center, Perry and Day 
broke up two plays for lo8ses,and the 
quarter ended, fourth down, 1 1 yards 
to go on the Aggie 26-yard line. 

Fountain opened the quarter with 
a forward pass but it failed giving the 
ball to Aggie on the 29-yard line. 
Palmer kicked to Fountain, who was 
downed in mid-field. Miller also 
punted, and two rushes by Darling 
combined with a 5-yard penalty made 
it first down. Whorf broke through 
center for 9 yards and Palmer made 
it first down. Then two penalties for 
off-side play forced Palmer to punt 
Miller and Fountain made 15 yards, 
but on the next end run, Grayson 
threw Fountain for a 6 yard lose. A 
forward pass. Fountain to Cantwell 
netted 25 yards, putting the ball on 
the M. A. C. 38-yard line. Williams 
made ten yards at end, but then 
the Aggie line stiffened, holding on 
three rushes. Miller made a drop 
kick from the 30-yard line that sailed 
high over the cross bar. Murphy re- 
placed Melican. Miller kicked to 
Palmer who advanced the ball to the 
30-yard line. On a series of tackle 
plays, Darling and Palmer advanced 
to ball to mid-Held, but Palmer lost 
the ballon a fumble, Banks recover- 
ing. Williams and Fountain reeled 
off two brilliant end runs. Then, 



Day saved the day by throwing Mil- 
ler for a 12-yard lose. The line 
braced again and Springfield punted 
behind the goal line,giving Aggie the 
ball on the 20-yard line. On the first 
play, Springfield recovered a fumble 
on our 15-yard line, but Plaisted 
threw Fountain for a 6-yard lose and 
averted disaster. The half ended 
with the ball on our 13-yard line. 

In the second half, Palmer made a 
short kick to Miller on his 40-yard 
line. By successive end runs, Wil- 
liams and Fountain carried the ball to 
our 22-yard line but the line braced 
again and Aggie got the ball on 
downs, only to lose it on a fumble 
recovered by Stine. A forward pass 
outside, gave the ball to Aggie on 
their own 20-yard line. Darling and 
a 10-yard penalty for interference 
made it first down at mid-field. On 
the next play, Shay recovered 
Whorf s fumble. After Day had 
thrown Cantwell for a 12-yard lose, 
Miller kicked to Murphy who ran the 
ball back 15 yards. After a few 
short gains, Palmer kicked outside 
on the 25-yard line. Beghold and 
Fountain were both thrown for 5 
yards loses by Day, forcing Miller to 
kick. On this play, Murphy waB 
laid out and had to be carried from 
the field, Melican taking his place. 
Then, followed two first downs by 
Darling. Grayson replaced Melican. 



•5 10 15 to f? 



Chorf - aftrniffieldY-MCA Col. /6 - MAC J ■ 
JO 35 40 45 Jft, «„fP 3? 9 *!*£_ 



tf 10 5 *!?i* 







Palmer made a drop kick from the 
30-yard line. Palmer kicked off and ; 
then Beghold ended the quarter with 
an 18-yard end run, putting the ball 
on the Aggie 40-yard line, but Day 
came to the front again with one of 
his timely tackles forcing Miller to 
pnnt. Darling carried the ball 16 
yards on two rushes. Then an Aggie 
forward pass was intercepted. Mil- 
ler punted and after being held three 
times the quarter ended with the ball 
in Aggie's possession on her own 35- 
yard line. Score : Springfield 10, M. 
A. C. 3. 

M. A. C. was penalized 15 yards to 
start the quarter because Melican wat 
sent in illegally. Palmer punted to 
bis own 40-yard line. After a few 
tries at end, Springfield tried a for- 
ward pass which went outside giving 
the ball to M. A. C. on the 40-yard 
line. Aggie's only forward pass that 
was caught by Plaisted for a ten yard 
gain. Then a first down was made 
on short gains by Whorf and Darling. 
With one yard to go for first down. 
Grayson failed at center, giving the 
ball to Springfield on her 30-yard 
line. Beghole and Fountain made 25 
yards on three rushes, but were forced 
to punt, Darling receiving on his 15- 
yard line. Whorf made a first down 
but Palmer punted on the next play. 
By a series of end runs, the ball was 
advanced to the 40-yard line, and 
from here, a steady advance put the 
ball on our 10-yard line, but Fountain 
lost 7 yards, and after two more at- 
tempts at the line, M. A. C. get the 
ball on downs. Palmer punted to 
Beghole who was nailed in his tracks. 
Meyers made 8 yards at center and 
Miller placed the ball on our 18-yard 
line, but Meyers lost the ball on a 
fumble. After two tries at the line 
Shabinger intercepted a forward pass 
and sprinted over the goal line for the 
second touchdown. Millerkicked the 
goal. Wioh 14 seconds to play, Mil 
ler kicked to Darling who ran the ball 
back 10 yards and the game was over. 
The score : 






SPRINGFIFXD. 

le, BelKCaptb 

It, Holmes 

lg, Stines 

e, Cooper 

i (j. Banks 

r t, Clapp 









M. A. C. 

Day, Williams, re 

Plaisted, Danforth, rt 

Fuller, rg 

Dole, c 

Perry, lg 

Curran, It 

Grayson, Plaisted, le 

re, Cantwell, Whalen, Shabinger 
Melican, Murphy, Grayson, qb 

qb, Miller, Shabinger 
Darling, rh lh, Fountain 

Whorf, lh rh, Williams, Myers 

Palmer, f U Beghole, Gibson 

Score— Springfield 17, M. A. C. 3. 
Touchdowns — Shabinger, Fountain, 
Field goals— Miller, Palmer, Goals from 
touchdowns— Miller a. Referee— Carpen- 
ter of Harvard. Umpire— Andrews of 
Yale. Head linesman — Dorman of 
Columbia. Time— is-minute periods. 

'94. — Treasurer A. J. Morse of th 
three-county agricultural society re- 
ports that the profit on the recent fair 
was $3000. This sum is exactly su . - 
ficient to pay of the last of the it • 
debtedness, but some of ft probabl v 
will be retained for improvementr. 



THE FOOTBALL BANQUET 

The annual football banquet was 
held at the Cooley House in Spring- 
field after the football game on Sat- 
urday. All the members of the team 
were present with the exception of 
Murphy and a general good time was 
in ortler. After an especially fine 
supper a few speeches were made 
and the election of captain for 1915 
took place. Manager Price was 
toaslmaster and spoke about the past 
season which was successful although 
the scores do not show it. Coach 
Brides then spoke. He mentioned 
the fact that he was coming back 
next year and it was his one ambi- 
tion to beat Springfield. He said 
that there was some fine material in 
the three lower classes and that it 
was his aim to develop it into a well- 
rounded team for next season. He 
brought out the fact strongly that it 
was up to every man to keep up in 
his studies as this is the main diffi- 
culty at present. Professor Hicks in 
his remarks especially emphasized 
the necessity of keeping up in studies 
particularly in the two lower classes 
as every year some of the best men 
are lost to the team through this 
cause. The other speakers were 
Assistant Coach Gore, Captain Meli- 
can, Dole, Whorf, Fuller, Bannister, 
and Brooks. After the speeches, H. 
A. Curran '16 was elected captain of 
the team for 1915. Curran has 
played tackle on the team since 
entering college, but has not won his 
letter till this year owing to injuries 
and studies. 



form our duty as we understand it.* 

'•Contrast the above with the auto- 
cratic ideals voiced by Bismarck and 
Von Buelow, by Nietzsche and Bern- 
hardi. Their religion is the cruel 
religion of force, and their philoso- 
phy knows no moral law. A few 
years ago Kaiser Wilhelm made the 
statement : 'There is only one master 
in this country, and that is I. Who- 
ever opposes me 1 shall crush to 
pieces. We Hohenzollerns take our 
authority from God alone, and to 
God alone are we responsible.' 
Frederick the Great asserted that 
any war is a good war if it is under- 
taken to increase the power of the 
state. Bernhardi tells us might is at 
once the supreme right. 

"How can we reconcile such 
beliefs to our American ideals? In 
America we are glad to accept the 
German culture, her science, her art, 
her literature; we like the German 
people and we acknowledge our debt 
to them in the upbuilding of our 
nation, but we do not like the dom- 
inant idea of pan-Germanism. We 
are justified in wanting to Bee the 
Germans beaten.*' 



DR. R. C. 

Dentist 

NASH'S BLOCK 
Evenings by Appointment. 



I.AUHOVITZ 

Tailor and PttSSSJ k. 

<unts' Furnishings -Dress Suits to 

Rent- Drill Qloves and Collars 

Ticket SrtTSMi 
UAmlty.Mt. i»i»t»r»© 



High Grade Furnishings 



WAR LECTURE 

"Americans stand for the doctrine 
that right makes might. The Ger- 
mans believe the reverse to be true, 
and that is why we cannot possibly 
take a pro-German attitude in the 
present struggle." 

Clearly and forcefully Ray Stan- 
nard Baker, speaking at the war lec- 
ture last Tuesday evening, explained 
the reasons for the anti-Ten Iodic 
sentiment which apparently holds 
sway throughout this country. 

Neither commercial nor political 
jealousy, he stated, is a factor in onr 
present position, bat the difference 
in ideals between the American and 
the German forms of government is 
a matter which cannot be bridged 
over. All great struggles are strug- 
gles for ideals, and the present war 
is nothing but a conflict between the 
ideals of democracy and autocracy. 

"Ever since the time of Washing- 
ton our poliey has been democratic 
Our endeavors have been directed 
toward the Ideal of self-government, 
and this U shown in every war in 
which we have taken part. The 
public utterances of our prominent 
statesmen, from Washington down 
to Roosevelt and Wilson, have all 
1 •mphaaized the democratic ideal. It 
was Lincoln who said I 'Let us have 
fnith that right makes might, and in 
thst faith let us have courage to per- 



SUNDAY CHAPEL 

In his most forceful and interest- 
ing manner Rev. E. B. Robinson of 
Grace church, Holyoke, gave the ad- 
dress in Sunday chapel on "The Un- 
seen Hand." The substance of his 
remarks is as follows : 

"Most young men look forward to 
the days that are to come, and their 
greatest problem is whether their life 
is going to come to anything after the 
sacrifices they have made and that 
have been made for them. The man 
must ask for himself if there is any 
work for him to do and if he will be 
able to do that work so as to make it 
worth while. We men who have 
faced this problem have come to real- 
ize that there is an unknown factor in 
our lives which may best be expres- 
sed in the words of the Bible: l I 
guided thee, though thou hast not 
known me.' 

"God's purposes are unsuspected 
but eternally true. Gods wonderful 
power over nations and men, over 
which power no one has control is ad- 
mirably illustrated in history by the 
fall of Constantinople, the defeat of 
the Huns, and the landing of the 
Pilgrims in Massachusetts. 

"The hand that leads men to ■ 
work unknown to them guides with 
unerring accuracy even though it 
leads them from their chosen work 
as in the case of Livingstone. I be- 
lieve that God has a plan and a pur- 
pose for every man and when you arc 
up against it, you will realize that 
God is working for your success. My 
experience in life thus far may be 
expressed by 'Whither shall I fief 
from thy spirit, whither shall I go 
from thy presence, even there shall 
thv hand lead me and thy right hand 
uphold me.* Without the God that 
leads, guides, and helps, you are lost, 
while with that God you can do any- 
thing." 




\ \ II K.I ... I') 11 



Travel the country over and you'll not 
find a choicer or a better line of Men's 
Toggery than you'll find right lure. 

The best shirt makers, underwear 
makers, scarf makers and glove 
makers send us these productions. 

The Best in Every Line 
is Here. 

Then again, we are not high priced. 
All the patrons of this store know 
this to be a fact. Test us and see. 

See our new Manhattan and Monarch 
Shirts, $1.50 t> $2.50. 

Look at our Gloves, $1.00 to $2.50. 

See our Neckwear, 25c U) $1.50. 



Two Hundred MacKinaws Now Ready for Your Inspection. 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



NOTICE ! 

Twenty-five cents will be put in a box for t be 
NEW ATHLETIC FIELD every time you 
buy shoes at our store costing $3.50 or over. 

VERY LATEST STYLES. 

Shoes for the Drill- $2.50 to $5.00 

F^otce'^ Shoe Store 

ScbooTand College Photographers . . • 




/ nrAILY- S« Center St. f Northampton Mass., 

| These Studio, offer the beat skilled 

,546-548 Broadway, "t.st. and mMt complete 

New York City I ,qui P m e nt obtainable 

JACKSON & CUTLER 

OEALF.R3 IIS— 

Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 









I 




The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 17, I9H- 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 



Kditor-i 

Managing 

Assistant 

Athletic 

Athletic 



FRANK W. BUELL'ii, 

TYI.ER S. ROGERSM6, 

HENRY If, WHITE'lS. 

JAMES A. PRlCE'iS, 

E. SUMNER DRAPER'15, 

THOS.L. HARROCKSM6, Department 

ALFRED A. GIOK)SA'i6, C?mpus 

FRANK A. SCHEUFELE, Alomni 

MILFORD R. LAWRENCE '17. 

Associate 
RICHARD W. SMITH »17, Associate 



n-Chief 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 



Editor 
Editor 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

MAURICE J. CLOUGH '15, Business Manager 
CHAS A. HUNTINGTON, JR. '16, 

Assistant Business Manager 
W. RICHARDSEARS'i?. Advertising Man'g'r 
LESTER E. FIELDINC16, Ass't Adv. Mgr. 
BIRGER R. ROSEQUIST«i7, Circulation 



Subscription #1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable 
to Maurice J. Clough. 



Entered as second-class matter at the Amharst 
Pa* Office. 



Vol. XXV. Tuesday, Nov. 17. No. 10 



41 Applied altruism and practical 
social service." That is the avowed 
aim of boys' club work, the objective 
toward which the volunteers are 
striving. In the roster of college ac- 
tivities there is uo form of endeavor 
that is finer iu its conception, no 
field for development which offers 
greater possibilities. Club work is 
not sentimentalism, it is work for 
strong men, for men of force and 
virility. To curb the wild impulses 
of a group of ardent boys, to di- 
rect their instincts into the right 
paths, to instill physical, meutal 
and moral attainments, to i4 teach 
the young idea to shoot,"— nothing 
can be more praiseworthy, and surely 
few things are attended with greater 
difficulties. 

From a purely practical viewpoint, 
it is of the highest importance to the 
community that the rising generation 
should be properly educated. The 
public school educates only one side ; 
there are other tides of l»oy nature 
which are equally in need of develop- 
ment. The boy scout movement, the 
"big brother" movement in the cities 
and the movement for juvenile farm- 
ing elobe in fee country, all these are 
merely evidence* of the fact that 
educators are awakening to the neces- 
sity of giving the growing »>oy train- 
ing which shall vigorously develop 
his physical and moral nature as well 
as his mental activity. 

The boys* elub leader, if he has 
the proper instincts of leadership, is 
not only a boy among his boys, but 
at the same time he Is a sort of a 
deity to be worshipped by them. He 
meets them once a week or ©ftener, 
he superintends their games, he directs 
debates, he guards over their organl- 
ittion, and above all things he aims 
to teach them self-reliance and self- 
control, he aims to teach them how 
to teach themselves, 

In the great new movement for 
boys' organizations, the colleges of 
the land must take a leading part. 



And let us trust that in this move- 
ment Massachusetts will not find her- 
self in the rear ranks. Our boys' 
club work and club classes, while not 
yet incorporated in the extension ser- 
vice, are already in spirit associated 
with that department. The Chris- 
tian Association is backing the work 
with all possible vigor, and quite a 
number of men from the four classes 
have signed up as volunteers. But 
more men are needed, the demand 
is far greater than the supply. Boys' 
clubs have arisen in various placee 
where no leaders are available, and 
the call for student workers is be- 
coming insistent. 

In this field of personal philan- 
thropy, Massachusetts has an un- 
equalled chance to make a name for 
herself, and it will be a name of far 
more value than fleeting reputations 
achieved in other ways. Are we 
going to rise to the opportunity 9 

CAMPUS CALENDAR 

[Notices for this column should be dropped in 
the Collegian Office or handed to Alfred A. 
Gioiosa'16, on or before the Saturday preceding 
each issue. 1 

Nov. 18. 
1-10 p. M. — Assembly- Mr. W. J. 
Campbell, Y. M. C. A. 
College, Springfield. 

Nov. 19. 
6-30 p. m.— Glee club rehearsal in 

chapel. 
6-45 p. m.— M. A. C. C. A. in 

chapel. 

Nov. 22. 
Ml A.*. — Sunday chapel. Rev. 
Clarence F. Swift, First 
Congregational church, 
Fall River. 

Nov. 24. 

5-00 p. u. — Junior class sing in 
chapel. 

6-30 i\ m.— War lecture by Pro- 
fessor Sprague. 

7-00 p. M. — Stockbridge club in So- 
College. 

7-15 p. m.— Landscape Art club in 
Wilder Hall. 

Nov. 25. 
12-00 m. — Thanksgiving recess be- 
gins. 

Nov. 30. 
1-10 p. m.— Thanksgiving recess 
ends. 
No chapel exercises. 

Dec. 1. 
5-00 p. m.— Sophomore class sing in 

chapel. 
7-00 p. m. — Stockbridge club in So. 

College. 



BEXATiTi Baby Cough Syrup 



For a young cough. 



REXALL 



For your cough. 



Each 25 cents a bottle 



HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The REXALL Store on the Corner 



UNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 



COLLEGE SHOES 



A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

REGULAR SUNDAY SERVICE AT 7 P M. 



E. RUSSELL NORTON 



We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 



MODERN REPAIR DEPT. 



SALES AGENT 



Davenport Miller 
Vein Coal 

Best Quality Pennsylvania Cnal 



E.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOEMAN 



BOSTON OFFICE 

85 Water St 



NEW YORK OFFICE 

t Broadway 



E. E. MILLETT 

JEWELER and OPTOMETRIST 

Lenses ground while you wait 

College Jewelry 

Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and Guitar Strings 

AMHERST, MASS. 
Next to Post Office. 



Amherst 



CO - OP LAUNDRY 

High-Grade College Work 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

CURRAN * DYER, Props. 

Loose-Leaf Note Books and Fountain 
—Pens— 



Shirts, 
Collars, 
Cuffs, - 
Plain wash, 
Same, rough dry, 



10-15C 

3 I-2C 

s i-ac 

48c per dox. 
- 30c per doz. 

DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, #1.50 a Suit 

R.T. FKoST.Agent; D. Sherinyan, Asst. Agent 
Try our ticket system 

Put full name and address on laundry 



Come to us for- 



As usual the Springfield game 
brought back many of the alurnDi. 
Among those present were : C. Rice 
•01, G. E. CTHearo '04, W. J. O'NeU 
and H. II. Goodenoogh '05, K. E, 
Gillett »08, W, D. Barlow '09, E. J. 
Burke *10, A. W, Dodge '12, G. A. 
Mallett, W, V, Hajden, A. W. 
Headle, G. Zabriskie, F, D. Griggs, 
W, H. Hasey, K. R. Clark, L. A. 
Bevan 'IS, H, W, Harris, R, E. 
DstU, T. A. Nicolet, R. F. Leet«, 
H. Niseen, G. Fuller, L. W. Need- 
ham, S. B. Foster, E. M. Ingham, 
A, W. Taylor, M. G. Tarbell "14, L. 
8. Grisworld and K. G. Bevao ex - 1 7. 



Fireplace Goods, Goat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brashes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooling Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING GO. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 17, 1914. 



lie Holyoke Valve £ Hydrant Co. 

bbersof Wrought Iron and Brass Pipe, Vahres 
,1 Fittings for Steam, Water and Gas, Asbestos 

1 Magnesia Boiler and Pipe Coverings, Pipe 
■it toSketch, Mill Supplies. Engineers and 

■ ntractorsfor Steam and Hot Water Heating, 
\utomatlc Sprinkler Systems, Boiler and Engine 

uinections. - - Holyoke, **»%. 



Reserved fox* 



BEOKMAN 



**He**wj» 



LOW PRICE TAILORING CO. 

SUITS MADE TO ORDER 
>uits Cleaned, Pressed and Dyed. All kinds of 
Repairing for Ladies anrt Gentlemen neatly done. 
High-grade work by first class tailor. Work 
1 1 lied tor and delivered. Sell tickets for pressing, 

4 SUITS FUR $1 50 

GEORGE KOrOWITZ, Prop. 

Main Street, Amherst. Mass. Nash Block 
On your way to the Post Office. Tel. 438 W 



FLEMING'S SHOE STORE 



Northampton 



For particular people 

THE ELMS RESTAURANT 

213 Main St., Northampton 

(Near Amherst car line) 



* Quality Restaurant at Moderate 
Prices. 

TRY OUR SPECIALS 

And a la carte service. 

OYSTERS STEAKS CHOPS 
FRIED CHICKEN, ETC. 

Open 6 a. m. to it p. M. 



FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

imwn by the Floricultural Dept . 

We offer our surplus stock of cut 
flowers and plants at reasonable rates 
to students and faculty. This stock 
ii grown in modern houses under 
ideal conditions. Roses, carnations, 
violets, chrysanthemums and sweet 
peas in season. 

GROWN ON THE CAMPUS 

I 1 ■ If phone SOO 



WEBSTER'S STUDH) 

Everything in Photography 

Including Framing, 
Oood work speaks for Itself, 
sh Block, Amherst, Mass. 



COMMUNICATION 

(Communications to the Signal concerning 
matters of general interest are welcomed. The 
Signal is not to be held responsible for the 
opinions thus expressed.) 

Washington, D. C. Nov. 13, 1914. 
Editor of the Mass. Collegian : 
Dear Sir: 
There is a large attendance of M. 
A. C. men at the meetings that are 
being held here this week. No leBS 
than twelve different Associations, 
of which the American Association 
of Agricultural Colleges and Experi- 
ment Stations with its several sec- 
tions is by far the largest, are now 
holding their annual meetings. At 
these meetings representatives from 
nearly every state in the Union aud 
from Canada — engaged in the various 
brauehes of agricultural work — have 
gathered and are discussing impor- 
tant questions relating both to ad- 
ministration and research. 

On Wednesday President Wilson 
held a reception at the White House 
for those in attendance and Secretary 
of Agriculture Houston and Assis- 
tant Secretary Vrooman have deliv- 
ered addresses. The programs have 
included addresses by President 
Butterfield on "The Relation of Far- 
mers* Institutes to Rural Sociology ; " 
by Professor E. L, Morgan on "An 
Experiment in Rural Community 
Planning ;" by State Forester Rane 
on '* The Massachusetts State For- 
estry Work ;" by Dr. H.J. Wheeler 
'83, on "Experiment Station Re- 
search as Seen from Within and 
Without f by Dr. E. W. Allen '85, 
on "Administration of Station Work 
by Projects ;" by E W. Morse ex- 
*94, on "The Necessity for Stand- 
ardizing Feeding Tests ;" and by H. 
J. Baker '1 1, on "The Application of 
Farm Management Surveys in Mas- 
sachusetts." 

On the lists of officers and members 
of committees M. A. C. is well rep- 
resented : President Butte rfJeld is 
one of the Vice-Presidents and Dr. 
Hills '81, Secretary-Treasurer of the 
A. A. A.C. and E. S. and Professor 
lliiiil is Chairman of the Section 
of Extension Work. Prof. L. B. 
Taft '8*2, is Secretary-Treasurer of 
the Association of Farmers' Insti- 
tute Workers ; Dr. E. W. Allen *85, 
of the Association for the Promo- 
tion of Agricultural Science, and G. 
A. Billings '95, of the Farm Man- 
agement Association, of which Prof, 
Foord has just been elected Vice- 
President. 

On Wednesday night the Massa- 
chusetts men and the wives of sev- 
eral, to the number of 34, gathered 
during the dinner hour in the Crystal 
room at the new Ebbitt hotel. After 
dinner had been served and the tables 
cleared President Butterfield re- 
sponded to the request of Dr. E. W. 
Allen, representing the M. A. C. 
club of Washington, and spoke of 
the work at M. A, C. In the course 
of his remarks President Butterfield 
paid a high tribute to the memory of 
Dean Mills and hia life and work. 
Trustee W. H, Bowker '71 wu also 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 



Mr. Campion has just returned from England with the 

AQUASCUTUM 

OVERCOATS 

Wells-Margetson Neckwear, Caps & Knitted Vests 

On account of war it will not be possible to get any more of 
these goods, so an early inspection will be to your advantage. 




Fine Tailoring 



Men's Furnishings 



-See Our Agents- 



I Hubbard's BasE Fertilizers 



ll« 0.I.I 



the most economical you can use, 

BetteR crops 

FFDtiT t-r^VJS^ are tne inevitable result. 

THE ROGERS fc HUBBARD COMPANY, Middletown, Conn. 



BEE, 

2*NECT\S 



Oltirp Hill! Work*, Port lull. I. Conn. 



w% • Qt are supplied every year 

DUFDee s deeds direc v° m °« *«*■*- 

the seeds of any other growers. Do you know Burpee- 
Quality "Seeds that Grow" ? If not, we would like to 
make your acquaintance. Simply send us your address 
(a postal card will do) and you will receive Burpee's 
Annual for 1914,— a bright new book of 1 82 pages, which 
is recognized as "The Leading American Seed Catalog." 
Kindly write to-day! Address 

W. ATLEE BURPEE & CO., Burpee Building*, Philadelphia 




A. 




MEN'S 



USE OUR NEW CASH DISCOUNT CARD 
AND SAVE FIVE PER CENT ON 

SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING 

Furnishings and Custom Tailoring 



C*rpfivter & Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 



No i, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mam. 






The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 17, 1914- 



JORDAN MARSH COMPANY 

Boston 

TWO GREAT BUILDINGS— OVER 1 ,000,000 SQUARE FEET 
OF FLOOR SPACK— 169 SKPARATE SELLING SECTIONS. 

For Room Furnishings, Wearing Apparel, Unique and 
Practical Articles for Gifts- in fact each of the thousand 
and one things student life calls for- this store is the logi- 
cal shopping place for the college men of New England. 

Our Clothing and Furnishings Store is just a step from 
Summer Street. Dn not fiiil to vi>it when you are in Boston. 
It is filled with just the kind of toggery young men like. 

All Purchases delivered FJREE to Amherst. 

if ait OrdtTS given prompt attention. 



THE 

Hoover & Smith Go. 

616 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 

Diamond Merchants 

Philadelphia's Official Fraternity Jeweler 

SPECIALISTS IN 
Fraternity Badges, Fobs, Novelties, 

Rings, Charms Prises Trophies 

Medals College Pins, Fobs, Seals, 

Rings, Charms 



S. S. HYDE 

JBWELEK & OPTICIAI^ 

Now at 1 J Hleasnnt St. 
Oculists' I'k-m hi tious l-Hled. Uroken Lenses 

Accurately Keplaced. Fine Watch KepaimiK 
Prompt!) .<nd -kilfully Done. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 



Batchelder & Snyder Co. 

MSCHsti rout.TKV DBftMKaU 

and Burma «*iwst*. 

WHOLESALE DUUII IN 

Beef Mutton. Lamb. Veal, Pork, l-ard. Hams. 

tiacon. Sausajres. Poultry, tiame, Butter 

Cheese, Hgtfs. Beans. 

OAeaft Start* IfcSf.tM*. il & "J BUckstone St. 

i; Htmi 1'tckiiig House, llnylituu. Mass. 

N it we Poultry Dressing Plant, Boston. 

Creameries in Vermont. 



" BIDE- A- WEE 



n 



Creamed Chicken and Waffles 

(Uii - |>f. 1.1 It \ — A nd other |Oed things to eat. 

MK5. L. M. STEBBIN.S, 

Middle Street, Had ley, Mass. 

Tel. 415 W 



"SCOTTIE" 
H. HOOPER 

Will dean and press your clothes so you 

will be satisfied. It costs no more 

and he is .learer to "Aggie." 

1. 1 III It »t. 1HKKT MSTI M 

Under Columbia Cafe 



E. B. DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

L>ENTAL ROOMS 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

Office lloui - QtouA. M„ i-jotocv.M. 



STKAM FITTING. 
GAS FITTING. TINNING 



Telephone 50— 1< 



P. W. DANCE & CO., Plumbers 

Specialty ol Repairing 

CHURCH Wisimiws, Memorial 
WiKiiiiws, I.kaii Lights. &c. 

(Clifton Ave.. AMHKKsT. MASS. 



called upon and gave an interesting 
talk. 

Those present were : — President 
Bntterfield, Professor and Mrs. 
Hnrd, Professor* Brooks, Poonl, 
Marshall, Morgan and Shaw, Dr. 
Heal, W. H. Heal, H. L. S Unison, 
W. H. Howker'71, L. K. Taft '82, 
J. L. Hills "81, S. C. Damon '88, H. 
J. Wheeler *«3, K. W. Allen '«:», P. 
S. Cooley 'H8, B. L. Hartwell '88, K. 
W. Morse '94 and Mrs Morse, G. 
A. Billings, P. II. Smith ,( .)7, W. A 
Hooker 'D!>, A. C. Monahan '00 and 
Mrs. Monahan, G. R. Bridgefoith 
•01, H. L. Knight '02, T. G. French 
•or,, W. K Turner '08, R. .1. Fiske 
►10, H. .1. Baker '11 and .1. E. 
Dudley '12. 

Wm. A. Hooker, Secretary, 
M. A. 0. Club of Washington. 

PHI KAPPA PHI ADDRESS 

(Continued from page 1] 



LANDSCAPE ART CLUB 

Tuesday evening the Landscape 
Art Club was fortunate to have P. 
H. Elwood of the extension depart- 
ment lecture on "Extension Work 
Along the Lines of Civic Art." 
In brief, he said : 

"Our work in civic art comprises 
three factors: namely, the aims of 
the work ; the methods pursued ; and 
the problems to be contended with. 
The aim of the work is to combine 
the beautiful, useful, and the livable 
elements, in rural communities espe- 
cially. We do not strive to produce 
particular sections of beauty, such as 
the rich man's estate, but rather to 
beautify communities in general. It 
is our ultimate idea to make a com- 
plete effect in our rural communities, 
so that it will be an incentive to live 
in the place. This is the purpose 
and there is a long road leadiog to it. 
Our methods in our work follow a 
defiuite plau. Our first task in a 
town is to obtain a general idea of 
the place. Next we give suggestions 
to the committee in charge of beau- 
tifying the town, and later send more 
specific details. Finally, if the in- 
terest and enthusiasm in the work 
continues, an agent is put in charge 
of the aff air, and he considers the 
town in detail. However, we have 
our problems to contend with, for 
often town politics spoils a good 
prospect, and sometimes there is a 
scarcity of funds with which to con- 
tinue the work. Again, the interest 
of the people may die out, for they 
fail to appreciate the value of civic 
art to a rural town. We are striving 
to made America more lieautiful in 
her rural districts than any other 
country. We overlook individuality 
and aim to make the country more 
enjoyable for the people. 



THIS TEWI'MY l'AI«M)IC 

< leHtialniC Prenalns; lt«-|mlrln* 

palatini **>rvle*» »*»t Work. I.nwent 1*1 Isa 

All woik carefully done. Work called for and 
delivered. Gents* ©rereoats. suits, pants and 
coats. Ladies' tine linen «mts a specialty. 
Teams will call every day at M . AC 

WM. HU>KI.I>. ITop. 

Rear Nash Bl'k. Amherst. Tel. No. 34J-4 



Huntington Ave., Exeter and Blagden Sts., Boston, Mass. 

Headquarters for College Men when in the city. 

AMOS H. WHIPPLE, PROP 



Now is "the time to be planning for 

FraternityGroups 

— — Have them taken at 

MISS McCLELLAN'S STUDIO 

44 State Street, Northampton, Mass 



nifieant incidents in life and to ar- 
range them properly which makes a 
good dramatist, for he has but two 
hours to make known the lives of bis 
characters and make them under- 
stood. 

"The theater touches thousands 
more than the university today, and 
for this reason it must be made high- 
ly educational. More than this, the 
crowd in a theater is the most heter- 
ogeneous of all crowds in the world, 
generally commonplace in emotions 
tad conservative in opinions. The 
drama, then, is an important part of 
education, for it is an education in 
itself. It may even be called the 
greatest educational function for man- 
kind st the present time." 

After Professor Perry had finished 
the address, Dr. Sprague announced 
that at a recent meeting of the Phi 
Kftppa Phi society the customary fall 
election was held, and it was voted 
that the society add three new mem- 
bers: Ernest Elwood Stanford of 
Amherst; Henry Harrison White of 
West Peabody; and Vincent Sao- 
chelli of Waterbury, Conn. 



SMOKER POSTPONED 

Owing to the high cost of living 
and the consequent shortage of 
money among its members, the class 
of 1817 decided Wednesday to post- 
pone until later in the year their 
smoker, which was to have been held 
at Clinton Hall after the Spring- 
field game. It was thought that a 
more convenient time for the class 
to get together could be arranged 
and the affair will probably be held 
at this same hotel right after the 
mid-year examinations. 



N1NETEEN-THIRTKEN NOTES 

"Nubble" Adams, "Norm** Clark. 
"Doc" Fay, Headle M. and Headlc 
H., Arlin Cole, Fred Griggs, "Joe" 
Murray, George Zabriskie 2nd and 
•He 1 uic" Goodnough were at the 
Springfield game Saturday and at- 
tended the little feed in the Highland 
afterwards. 

Quin liowry came over the road 
from New Haven for the game bur 
just missed out. Lawrence Bevan 
was at the game but couldn't make 
the feed. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 17, 1914. 



CROSS COUNTRY 

[Continued frotii page i] 



Brown of M. I. T. in a spectacular 
finish. The order of the teams and 
the places scored by each was as 
follows : 



College, 




Points, Totals. 


Maine, 


1 


3 7 21 34 66 


M. I. T., 


4 


9 17 19 20 69 


Dartmouth, 


10 


11 14 16 23 74 


M. A. C, 


6 


8 26 33 42 115 


Williams, 


2 


27 29 37 41 136 


Colby, 


5 


30 31 32 47 145 


Brown, 


18 


22 28 38 40 146 


Worcester P. ] 


[. 12 


13 35 46 49 155 


Amherst, 


15 


43 51 54 55 218 



hold Olarrcn 

South Deerfield, Mass. 



T. xt. AHERN, MANAGER 



J, FOB YOUR DEN R 

U Beautiful College Pennants V 
YALE and HARVARD, 

Each 9 in. x 24 in. 

PRINCETON, CORNELL, 
MICHIGAN, 

Each 7 in. x si in. 

4 Pennants, Size 12 x 30—4 

Any Leading Colleges of 

Your Selection 

All of our best quality, in their 
proper colors, with colored emblems. 

Either assortment, for limited time, 
sent postpaid for 50 cents and five 
stamps to cover shipping costs. 

Write us for prices before placing 
orders for felt novelties of all kinds. 

The (lem City Novelty Co., 

40a Bittner Street, 
Dayton, - . Ohio. 



SEE and TBY 

if LAVAL 

We cannot believe that there is a 
sensible man living who would pur- 
chase any other than a DE LAVAL 
Cream Separator for his own use if 
he would but SEE and TKY an im- 
proved DE LAVAL machine before 
buying. 
It is a fact that 99% of all separator 
buyers who do SEE 
and TRY a DE 
LAVAL machine 
before buying, pur- 
chase the DE 
LAVAL, and will 
have no other sepa- 
rator. The i% who 
do not buy the IJE 
LAVAL are those 
who allow them- 
selves to be influ- 
enced by something other than real 
genuine separator merit. 

Every responsible person who 

wishes it may have the Free Trial of 

a DE LAVAL machine at his own 

liome without advance payment or 

1 any obligation whatsoever. Simply 

I Mk the DE LAVAL agent in your 

I nearest town or write direct to the 

i »earett DE LAVAL office, 

THE DE UIAL SEPARATOR CO, 

iq r. Madison St. 

CHICAGO 




»^S liroadway 
ksw voas 



FOOTBALL REVIEW 

[Continued from page 1] 

showing two weeks previous and the 
set back had a good effect in prepa- 
ration for the big game at Spring- 
field. - That game, lost by a Bcore of 
17-3 was a disappointment to the 
college. Careless handling of the 
ball resulting in fumbling at critical 
moments and an interrupted forward 
pass at the close of the game were 
the live factors that contributed to 
Aggie's downfall. The game was 
hard fought, each team battling for 
every inch with the advantage favor- 
ing Springfield. 

The team as a whole has worked 
uniformly throughout the season and 
it is difficult to mention any one man 
that has shown as a star. Melican, 
up to the time he received his injury 
worked his team with a tine exhibi- 
tion of brains and his loss was per- 
haps the most serious reverse that 
was met with. "Cud" Darling has 
been a persistent ground gainer and 
hard to stop. "Doc" Whorf proved 
to be the find of the season, playing 
a hard fast game in the back field. 
Palmer's good boot has often cur- 
ried the team through a dangerous 
situation. Dole at center acquired 
the ability to get through the line, 
time and time agaiu tackling the 
opposing backs for losses. Plais- 
ted's good heaving arm was a strong 
point in our forward system. Every- 
man in fact played the game for all 
there was in it. 

Three men will be lost by gradua- 
tion from the regular first string 
line-up, Dole, Melican and Whorf. 
There will be eight of this year's 
line-up who should develop iuto 
even faster and stronger men with 
another year's work. Some men, 
as Danforth and Little who have 
just appeared this season are looked 
on as men to make their mark. 
Another factor in our favor is that 
Coach Brides has been appointed for 
another year of service in charge of 
the team. During the three years of 
his stay he has been working up a 
system and its results are showing 
themselves in the smooth working of 
the team. With three years of work 
and a strong nucleus of men that 
have worked nnder htm for the whole 
three yean the outlook is the bright- 
est that it has been for several years. 
Cnrran as captain is another bright 
hope that lies before the team. He 
has won his election through good 
playing and football sense. His 
past three years experience of work 
under Coach Brides has shown itself 
in his good work . 

So with 1915 ahead, a good coach, 
a good captain and a good squad in 
college we breathe a sigh of relief and 
look expectantly for a good season. 



'10.— Dexter E. Bailey, 187 Cam- 
pus Are., Ames, Iowa. At the Uni- 
versity of Iowa, engaged in post- 
graduate biological chemistry and 
acting as instructor In chernistrv. 




Cbc Pheasant 

Bmtt£ St., Bmberat 

Breakfast, Luncheon, 
Afternoon Tea. 

Dinner if arranged for. 
Telephone 470 

Rooms for Transients. 

theTeachers Exchange 

Of Boston 120 Boflston St, 

Recommends Teachers, Tutors and Schools 



An Especially Good Commission I'ronositlor — 
Cash fur tt-st orders— Artlets widely Advertised— 
Cuts down expense in power plants— Addtt 5 
Encinkkkini; Supflv Co., 2138 N. oth Street, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



<• They're not short-lived 

The Jerseys 

In 1913 eighteen Jersey 
cows wire officially tested 
which averaged 12 years 
and 7 months of are. Their 
average milk production 
was8t;i7 pounds. Average 
butter f it, 387 pounds. One 
ol tiu e cows was over 18 
years old. 

Longevity, Constitution and Emnomic 
Production are Jcrs.y characteristics, 

SMFRIf »N JtSSEY CATtll CLUB 

324 W. 23d St., New York City 




MQDRE'S $252 



NON-LEAK ABLE 



FOUNTAIN PEN 



diy(C$L 

^9 I f i^ *"^ Minimize your fountain pen 
m V ^^r troubles by owning a Moore's. C It Is the ' 

£/ ^^r safest, soundest and most dependable pen known. 
^ C. Its strength lies in la very simplicity. Nothing 
finiky to get ou t of order. €1. You can give your- 
self no better treat than a Moore's Non-leakable. /; 
For Sale by Dealers Everywhere 

American Fountain Pen Company 

Adams, Cushlnft & Foster. Selling Agents 
lift DEVONSHIRE STREET :: :: BOSTON, MASS. 



ANO 

UP 



v\ 




Eo Frank Coe Fertilizers 

I OCT THE BUSINESS FARMERS' STANDARD 1 Qt A 
IPO/ FOR OVER FIFTY-FIVE YEARS IV IH 

Do You Raise 300 Bushels of Potatoes per Acre? 

HREE hundred bushels per acre is 
not an unusual yield by any means, 
but did you get it this year ? 
*3JIf you were planning to raise 300 
bushels of potatoes to the acre how 
^ far apart would you space your rows? 
How far apart would you drop the seed pieces in 
die row? 

IJHow much fertilizer would you use to grow 300 
bushels of potatoes per acrer How would you 
apply it ? 

iJAre you sure that your seed potatoes are true to 
name and true to type ? 

IJWhat are you doing to prevent "scab,*' and early 
and late blight ? 

€JDid you have a short crop of potatoes because of 
dry weather ? Have you decided how you will 
overcome this trouble in the future ? 

•JAII these practical points, and many more, are fully covered an our 
new book 



ft 



u Potatoes: A Money Crop 

which will be ■eat free to every potato (rower who requests s copy, sad 
mentions this paper. 

sJThis book is written by a man who himself has had years of experience as 
a potato ((rower, and who has made a careful study ol tha best methods of 
other grower* 

<Jlf you read this book you will keep it for future reference. It is a "worth 

while" publication 

The Coe-Mortimer Company 

51 CHAMBERS STREET, NEW YORK CITY 










fl 






i i 



8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 17, 1914- 



JOIN THE BUNCH AT 



EPSTEIN'S TAILORING PARLORS 

Now located over post uttice. Up one flight 

Pressing and Cleaning a Specialty 

Liberal Ticket System Tel. 36 M 

T. MIEXTKA, 

SHOE STORE 

Shoes Repaired by Machinery 

SHOE SHINE 

Open Sunday from 7-12. On your way to P. O. 



The Highland Hotel 

Corner of Hillman and Barnes Streets, three 
blocks from the Union Depot, is a modern hos- 
telry run on the European Plan, It is just a step 
from Main Street, away from the noise and dust 
and yet in the center of the business district. 

Its rooms are well furnished and comfortable, 
having a telephone and hot and cold running 
water in every room. Prices 91 and up; rooms 
with bath (single) ei.fto and up. 

Its excellent cuisine and well ventilated dining 
room makes a meal a pleasant memory— every- 
thing of the highest quality, well cooked and 
served in the best possible manner. 

Stay at the Highland Hotel once and you will 
anticipate staying there again. Music every 
evening. 

D. H. SIEVERS, 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Offers courses of instruction in twenty eight teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science* 

A student may specialize in the following subjects : 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 



Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 

Agricultural Chemistry 



Highland Motel, 



Springfield, M>»«». 



STOOEUT F0BH1TDBE 

RUGS 

CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 

E. D, MARSH ESTATE 



Agricultural Economics 

Rural Sociology 

Economic Entomology 

Microbiology 

Plant Physiology and Pathology 

Agricultural Education 

Rural Social Science 

For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



FOUNTAIN PENS 

Moore's Swan'i 

Waterman's 

Thirty-six dozen pens to select fron . 

OUR RULE 

'Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded." 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



Associate Alumni, 

Joint Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics, 
M. A, C. Athletic Fie'd Association, 
The College Senate, 



Stephen Lane Foii©En| 

MANUFACTURING JBWBLItR 

ISO BROADWAY. NEW YOKK 



Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Rifle club, 

Roister Doisten* 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Fifteen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Sixteen Index, 



C. A. Peters, Secretary 

Philip H. Smith, Secretary 

C. S. Hicks, Treasurer 

E. Towne, President 

J. A. Price, Manager 

S. Prouty, Manager 

E. F. Clark, Manager 

E. 8. Draper, Manager 

II. Bishop, Manager 

R. M. Upton, President 

J. F. Nicholson, Produciug and Business Manager 

F. A. Auderson, Manager 

H. M. Rogers, Manager 

L. E. Fielding, Manager 



1ST COX SONS 
■HP, VINING 

73-74 Madison Avenue, New York 

CAPS AND GOWNS 

Best Materials and Workmanship 



M. A. C. Christian Association, 
M. A. C. Catholic Club, 
Fraternity Conference, 
Stockbridge Club, 



H. H. White, President 
J. E. Harper, President 
F. W. Buell, President 
P. F. Whitmore, President 



OZjtTB AND COLLEGE 
PINS AND RINGS * 

OOI.O. HII.VKR APT!! HHONZH MMOA1.N 



RAHAR'S INW| 

Norlhampton, MMMCtWMtte 
TWO BLOCKS FROM THE DEPOT 

The hotel where there is comfort (with] 

out extravagance.) More popular 

than ever. 

Special Luncheon 12-2 P. M. 

PRIVATE DINING ROOMS 
A la Carte Service 

I rom 6 30 to II P.M. 



There are Seven Good Reasons why youshould 
buy your 



COAL 



or 



C. R. ELDER 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 



27 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 



1 



ICE CREAM, 



Stationery, Newspapers, 
Magazines and Col- 
lege Supplies 

A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer. 



The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Mt., alongside the 
famous Bloody Brook battle ground 
to Old Deerfield, thence to Green- 
field, Turners Fall* and across the 
" Plains " to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 

50 Mite* of Trackage - nodern 
tiuuipment Train Dispatch- 
ing System - Freight and Ex- 
press Service over entire line. 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
Company 



CARS 



Leave AGOIE COLLEGE for HOI 
YOKE at 15 mln. pant the hour. 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST for ACK1IK COU 
LEGE at 7 and 97 mln. past the hour 



Child mly finm i A. M to 4 A.M. 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of " Gold Medal Uniforms. " 
1434-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, 



AMHERST & SUNDERLAND ST. RY. 



For a Dally and Sunday Newspaj 
Yoa should Read 



Springfield Republi 

While yoa are at college in Amherst. 

1 tlm. Hi 1 "f T».«- M A. C. v • « • 
Thf H<»t Sporting NeWI 

rnllQtMfldMn 



II I. » 



Newspaper 



Daily ', 3 cents ; 70 cents a month ; 2 
a quarter. 

Sunday, $ cento; 50 cents a Quarter. 

Subscribe by mail or through tbt A mbent Ml 





NOV 27 1914 
milr in •*) 

Oolic^ar 



MASSACHUSETTS AGKICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXV. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, November 24, 1914. 



No. 1 1 



CROSS COUNTRY SEASON 

BRIEF BUT SUCCESSFUL 



Fourth Place in Intercollegiates and 
Victory Over Worcester Com- 
pletes Schedule. 

With the completion of the New 
Kngland Intercollegiate run the cross 
country team ended what may be con- 
sidered as a most successful season. 
The team was severely handicapped 
by the lack of competition in runs 
with other colleges, being able to 
finally book but one meet outside of 
the Intercollegiates, namely that with 
W. P. I, which was like a morsel to a 
hungry dog as far as affording experi- 
ence to a team of novices — novices in 
that only two of the seven men had 
ever had previous experience in this 
work. Soon after Amherst cancelled 
her annual run with us, came the with- 
drawal of Vermont from a scheduled 
run, while earlier in the season the 
booking of a meet with Maine was 
overthrown with the prospects of the 
.scheduling of more local runs. 

For next year the brightest pros- 
pects may be held for developing a 
team that should bring the Maroon 
and White to the front, as there will be 
no loss by graduation and an abund- 
ance of new material will be on hand. 



FRESHMAN NIGHT 

Partly owing to a variety of con- 
flicts, and partly in order to give the 
class orchestra an opportunity for 
further rehearsing, it was deemed 
best to defer the Freshman Night 
performance until after Thanksgiv- 
ing. In addition to instrumental 
und vocal selections, a dramatic 
v *ketcb and a short minstrel show 
£ will be given ; Senate members and 
3 others have assisted in couching these 
: c'wo numbers, and the persons taking 
<l)i»rtwill be ready for a production 
f;itany time. The Senate has not 
~-f vet decided definitely on a date, but 
the performance will probably oebeld 
:<s soon as the interclass debates have 
been concluded. 

PAST COLLEGE HISTORY 

William I. Fletcher, librarian emer- 
itus of Amherst college, has recently 
given much interesting material re- 
lating to the early history of this 
college. Several tracts, bulletins 
and pamphlets bespeak Dr. Butter- 
field's present college policy and 
make indissoluble links of progress 
stnnd forth more firmly wrought and 
welded than ever before. 



DOLLAR CHRISTMAS FUND 
FOR HOMELESS BELGIANS 



AGRICULTURALLY TRAINED 
MEN HAVE NEW OPENING 



Appeal Received for Cooperation in 

Raising Fund for Homeless 

Belgian Families. 

Tne following letter of timely inter- 
est has been received from Henry 
Clews in the interest of a worthy 
cause : 

"Christmas approaches and count- 
less unhappy Belgians, despite gov- 
ernmental relief, the Rockefeller 
Foundation and other valuable agen- 
cies, are confronted with starvation. 
1 therefore beg the favor of your 
columns to say that the Dollar 
Christmas Fund for Homeless Bel* 
gians, of which I am treasurer, is 
working for the special purpose of 
preventing starvation amongst hun- 
dreds of thousands of Belgians this 
winter. For this purpose we are 
co-operatiug with the London "Shill- 
ing Fund" a much older fund which 
has collected nearly #800,000 and 
which is expressly organized to see 
that no Belgian man, woman or child 
spends Christman-tide devoid of food 
and shelter. 

There will be no duplicating, no 
overlapping and every penny sub- 
scribed will go direct to the victims 
in whose behslf I appeal. I believe 
this great work of mercy commands 
the sympathy of us all and more 
especially in this month when Ameri- 
cans, doubly blessed with peace and 
plenty, are preparing to celebrate the 
day of Thanksgiving. Inspired by 
this thought I suggest various ways 
in which you can help to avert the 
agony of suffering which must other- 
wise confront the refugees during the 
coming winter. You can send a 
donation to our fund addressed to 
myself as treasurer, Messrs. Henry 
Clews & Co., Rankers, Broad Street, 
New York, or you can apply to our 
secretary, Percy Bullen, 86 Broad- 
way, New York for a collecting card. 
He will be glad to issue same to 
any person enclosing references. 
Churches, Chapels, Clubs, Societies 
and Sunday schools can assist by a 
collection. Entertainment commit- 
tees may render great help by send- 
ing us the proceeds of benefit per- 
formances. In all these ways friends 
eve r y where are assisting nobly. All 
the money received will be cabled to 
Europe before Dee. 20. Many heads 
of families and boarding bouses have 
promised to "pass the plate" for the 

|V«afliaH wB ^sip^i^p ^ j 



W. J. Campbell of Y. M.C. A. College 

Explains Opportunities in Country 

Secretary Work. 

"Rural problems which the County 
Secretary of Y. M. C. A. work must 
face," was the subject of Wednes- 
day's assembly address, given by Mr. 
W. J. Campbell of the Springfield 
Y. M. C. A. College. Mr. Campbell 
is a graduate of Princeton University, 
who became interested in the work of 
the Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion, and is now in charge of the 
rural side of this movement at Spring- 
field. 

"Some time ago," Mr. Campbell 
said, "there was issued a pamphlet 
for the purpose of 'boosting' the state 
of Washington, in which was this 
statement; 'Washington's greatest 
resources are her wheat, her corn and 
her coal, but her greatest assets are 
he young men.' Tbia holds rrne 
throughout the nation — the country's 
greatest assets are her young men. 
Now tiie Y. M. C. A. work is a ma- 
chine for building up the greatest 
asset of our life. 

"There are great opportunities for 
the investment of many of you young 
men in the county secretaryship along 
this line. This is constantly being 
realized more and more throughout 
the country, as is shown by the in- 
terest manifested in the confidence of 
the government, the confidence of 
railroads, the confidence of the 
church, and the confidence of all those 
familial with rural needs and rural 
conditions. 

"There is a tremendous weight of 
responsibility, social importance and 
test of efficiency in this work. I want 
to offer a challenge to men who feci 
the Christian spirit in them to enter 
this work in county secretaryship 
We work together economically* 
socially and religiously, and we are 
especially interested In community 
enterprises. 

"Now, what is the work of a county 
secretary ? In the first place he must 
carefully diagnose the conditions 
which be finds. We bear a lot today 
about big enterprises and opportuni- 
ties. Let me say that the biggest en- 
terprise of all is the kingdom of God. 
The Y. M. C. A. is the mightiest or- 
ganization for carrying on that enter- 
prise in the Church of God, and offers 
the biggest opportunities for life in- 

[Continued on page 3l 



CURRAN TO LEAD MAROON 
AND WHITE ON GRIDIRON 

Election at the Annual Team Banquet 

Gives Him Captaincy for 

Next Year. 

At the annual football banquet 
held at Springfield Saturday follow- 
ing the game the team elected Henry 
Ambrose Curran of Marlborough 
captain for the coming season. 
Though these men were eligible for 
the position, Darling, Perry, Palmer, 
Plaisted, Jordan and Curran, "Duke" 
was elected on the first ballot. 

Curran is twenty years old and 
prepared for college at Marlborough 
high school. While there he played 
tackle his last two years on the 
school team. lie made the varsity 
team at M. A. C. his freshman year, 
and played in nearly all the games, 
although that year he was hindered 
greatly with a bad knee. Last year 
he played a great game at tackle and 




C4PTAW COBBJUf 



this year has played a part in many 
of the games, but was never at his 
best on account of an injury to bis 
leg sustained early in the season. In 
regard to next year Curran said : 







The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 24, 1914. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 24, 19 14. 



1 



"I look forward to a great year 
next season. Although M. A. C. 
has had one of the beBt teams she 
ever had this vear, I think we should 
have a better one next year. The 
sophomores have got to look out and 
keep on their Job with the studies, 
for if they can't keep those up they 
are no good to us. I think there are 
a few freshmen who will put up a 
good fijiht for varsity positions; 
they will certainly be valuable scrub 
men We'll have a lot of good juii- 
tora too. It's hard to lose the out- 
going seniors but we will pull 
riiiht." 



through a 



SUNDAY CHAPEL 
In an interesting manner, Rev. 
Clarence F. Swift of the First Con- 
gregational eh u rill, Full River, gave 
the sermon in Sunday Chapel on 
"Obedience." The substance of his 
talk was based upon the text, "Give 
tribute unto them to whom tribute 
belongs." His seimon in part was as 
follows : 

'Tu the olden days, people wore 
blue tassels upon their garments, to 
remind them of the Commandment* 
of the Lord. It was an association 
of ideas to keep true t<» (J<»d. It tits 
well, this cord of Mile ; it is both arbi- 
trary and rational. It symbolizes 
loyalty, constancy, ami devotion. 
The highest tribute to a soldier or a 
gallant hero is to remark that he is 
true blue. This cord of blue had a 
wonderful affect upon the individual, 
being the constant symbolism of 
authority, which was insisted upon, 
and of obedience, which was readily 
given. In short, it represents liberty. 
"There is no unrestricted liberty. 
The sky, the stars, and universe are 
all restricted by the laws of God. 
But above all, men are restiicted. 
Limitations give us the liberty which 
we possess ; they guurd us from birth, 
to mnnliood. to the grave. No man 
is at liberty to do all he likes to do, 
until he learns to do only what he has 
liberty to do. We have limitations 
imposed upon us by lawful authority, 
and we <piestion them. Needless to 
say, there have been unjust laws. 
As civilization progresses, however, 
these unjust restraints are being 
removed. 

"The question is, however, has this 
cord of blue been slipped too much? 
Will it lead us to be indifferent to 
things most essential ? Do we need 
a new call to obedience? The answer 
is yes! Let us emphasize it; while 
enhancing high grade liberty, culti- 
vate ol>edlence 

"Obedience is essential to the 
mind, soul, aud power. We conquer 
nature only by obedience to her laws. 
Obedience w liberty. The Ideal 
home is not a democracy ; it is a 
monarchy where the united bead of 
the family ha§ the power to make laws 
for the welfare of the governed, and 
where the governed love and obey 
these laws. The same is trne of the 
ideal state. The makers of law 



should be identified with those who 
obey them. They should be obeyed 
for the sake of a larger aim, and for 
the sake of the principle involved. 

"It is iu religious life, however, 
that obedience takes its full measure. 
We are brought face to face with 
God, the maker of no unlawful law. 
When Jesus Christ visitetl this world, 
it was to infuse a new spirit into the 
old relationship of man to God ; it 
was the spirit of obedience. 

"Hebrew life is associated with 
parental authority. We must get 
back to this parental authority in our 
family life if we wish to restore God 
to His rightful place. The obliga- 
tion of serving is the joy of obedi- 
ence. For your own good, cultivate 
obedience." 



STUDY CLASSES 
Group classes for the study of 
some of the live questions which 
interest students have now been 
formed under the direction of Mr. 
Sherk, the social secretary of the 
Christian association. These classes 
are conducted by different members 
of the faculty and usually meet in the 
professor's home or wherever the 
members prefer. They have a two- 
fold object ; to set the students think- 
ing on problems of common interest 
and to bring them into more intimate 
relationship with the profeseors. 

President Butterfield will have a 
class on Bible problems, for fresh- 
men, meeting at his home on Sun- 
days at 6 p m. This class will take 
up the discussion of the Bible in its 
relution to student life. 

Dr. Charles Wellington's class on 
"The Free Man" will meet at a time 
to be decided later. His other class 
on "Fraternity Problems" has 
already become popular and meets at 
his home on Amity street every Sun- 
day evening at 7-30. 

Students interested in Mr. Rand's 
class on "The Bible in English and 
American Literature" should see him 
to arrange for a meeting time. The 
class will take up the discussion of 
the Bible as the greatest of all books. 
"Problems iu Christian thinking" 
will be the subject for consideration 
in another class conducted by Mr. 
Band. 

Dr. Chamberlain's class on mission 
study meets Tuesday evenings at 
7-30 in his home. The men are tak- 
ing up the study of Agricultural 
Missions in particular. 

Two classes on "Student Life 
Problems" meet at the home of Mr. 
Watts at 7 p. m. on Sundays and 
Tuesdays. This should be of espec- 
ial interest to first year men as they 
here have a good opportuny to learn 
the solution of many of the perplex- 
ing difficulties which are continually 
coming up in their lives. 

"Scientific Aspects of Religion'* 
will be the topic of discussion in Dr. 
Charles Marshall's class, which will 
organize soon. Professor Hart is 
meeting with a class on "Ten Great 
Religions" Suuday mornings after 



chapel. Mr. Forbush will also con- 
duct a class on "Student Standards 
of Action," at a time to be decided 
later. The men will take up the 
discussion of the various problems 
which confront students. 

Harold M. Gore's class on Boys' 
Club Work has been meeting in the 
Drill Hall, Wednesday evenings at 
6-30 This is one of the most popu- 
lar of all the classes and the men are 
fitting themselves to take up work 
among boys in the neighboring 
communities. 

On Tuesdays at 4-30 Mr. Sherk 
conducts a class in County Y. M. C. 
A. work. Another class on "Depu- 
tation Work" meets in the chapel 
Thursdays *at 7 o'clock. This class 
will discuss the problems of the rural 
church and will fit the men to go out 
into the country churches to assist at 
the services. 

With such a large numbei of sub- 
jects to choose from, the student 
body should find an interest in some 
of these activities and give them the 
support which they deserve. 



CLASS RIFLE MATCH 

On Saturday, the freshman rifle 
team defeated the sophomore rifle 
team by 10 points, score 431 to 421. 
It was the first freshman victory over 
the sophomores, and the class is nat- 
urally elated over their success. In 
fact they are quite confident of down- 
ing the sophomores once more before 
the semester ends, and thus gain per- 
mission to smoke on the campus. 

This is the first year that there has 
been a regular class contest in this 
sport between the two lower classes, 
and as a result much interest was 
shown in the outcome. Each team 
was composed of ten men, although 
only the first men figured in the scor- 
ing. J. B. Minor and EL K. Allen 
were the high men for 1918, each 
scoring 88 points out of a possible 
100, while O. S. Flint lead the soph- 
omore aggregation with a total of 86. 
Captain Lane of the varsity rifle 
team was pleased with the results for 
this match uncovered some excellent 
material besides being a precedent 
for the future. 
The score : — 

1917. 



STOCKBRIDGE CLUB 

Supporters ot Jerseys and Hols- 
terns thrashed out the question of 
which is the better breed at a meet- 
ing of the Animal Husbandry section 
of the Stockbridge club Tuesday eve- 
ning. At the end of the meeting 
each side had presented some telling 
arguments and each claimed to be 
the win ler of the debate. Harper 
'15, who worked on one of the largest 
Jersey farms in the state last summer 
spoke in favor of that breed. He 
said : "The aesthetic beauty of 
the Jersey is unexcelled. The true 
dairy type is personified by this 
breed and by no other. High class 
customers all want Jersey milk which 
is the reason that many dealers have 
their carts labeled Jersey milk and 
cream. The Jerseys mature early 
and have a fair constitution and do 
not deserve the criticism they get on 
that point." 

Lewis, in bringing out the merits of 
Holstein breed said "Jerseys are a 
good deal of a fad, men who want to 
keep cows keep Jerseys, men who 
want cows to keep, have Hol- 
steins. The exponents of the Hol- 
stein type are men who raise cows 
for a living. They are the biggest 
profit producers of any breed. They 
have five points in their favor, size, 
digestive capacity, they are large 
producers, their heredity is well es- 
tablished and when their days as 
milk producers are over they are of 
some use for beef. There is more 
demand for Holsteins than for any 
other breed. From a medical point 
of view they give the best milk for 
infants." Lewis presented a mass 
of figures that would apparently 
prove almost anything if they were 
used in the right manner. 



Flint, O. S. (Capt.) 


86 


Livermore, W. S. 


85 


Stiles, A. R. 


84 


Boaz, W. H. 


84 


Everbeek, G. C. 


82 




421 


1918. 




Minor, J. B. (Capt.) 


88 


Allen, R. B. 


88 


Canlett, F. II . 


87 


Cheffords, L. D. 


85 


Barton, G. W. 


88 




431 



•03. — L. F. Harvey hat Bold his 
farm in Romford, Conn, and la now 
superintendent of the estate of Peter 
B, Bradley, Hingham. 



MURRAY D. LINCOLN 
Murray D. Lincoln, who graduated 
in 1914, has already made an excel- 
lent start in life, and his great service 
rendered in the New London County 
Improvement League as a field agent 
makes him stand out as a true leader. 
Russell J. Bates, writing in the 
"Countryside Magazine" says in 
short : Lincoln, the field agent of the 
New London League has the genuine 
Lincoln blood in his veins. He is 
admired by all the farmers in his dis 
trict who will appreciate his kuowl 
edge of dairying. He has an auto- 
mobile with which he keeps in per 
sonal contact with the country people, 
helping them to make life worth liv- 
ing. He is teaching the doctrine of 
co-operation with great success and 
haa already secured the confidence 
and faith of the people, who recognize 
him as man who has their wellfare at 
heart," 

While in college, Lincoln stood out 
is something more than ordinary. 
He was a member of the Senate and 
filled his position admirably. The 
< olleoiah wishes him continued sue 
cess in his new paction. 

'05. — H, D. Croeby, Princeton. 



CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

Thursday's meeting of the Chris- 
tian Association, though rather 
sparsely attended, was a warning to 
the members to make special efforts 
to bring around a large number of 
men at the coming meetings. Sev- 
eral good speakers will be heard be- 
tween now and Christmas, and it will 
be worth any man's time to come and 
take an active interest in the affairs 
of the association. 

Mr. Payne, of the faculty, gave a 
short talk at the last meeting. He 
spoke iu part as follows : 

"A man enters college for four 
reasons ; first, for character-building : 
second, for his health ; third, for 
mental discipline; and fouith for in- 
formation. Many of us are apt to 
get the order of these things reversed 
and place too much emphasis on "get- 
ting-by" and too little on forming 
strong characters. 

"Courage is a quality to be desired 
iu any man's life, but many a fellow 
who is courageous in big things fails 
utterly when confronted with the little 
temptations. We must learn to take 
a firm stand in the trivial matters 
which come up every day, for only 
iu this way can we build up useful 
characters, free from selfishness and 
ready to cooperate with other men in 
a common cause. If we realize tint 
everything we do or say is either 
helping or hindering some one. we 
will be more careful in our mauner of 
living. 

"Success comes at last to all who 
have the courage to keep everlastingly 
doing the things that they are given 
to do. It is measured, not in terms 
of money, but in terms of broud- 
mindedness, charity, sympathy and 
the conscientious living of a useful 
life." 



will be required of the linemen be- 
ginning after Thanksgiving aud con- 
tinuing throughout the winter. In 
the spring, track work will be re- 
quired of the ends and tackles. 



LETTER MEN IN FOOTBALL 

The Athletic Association voted to 
award the following men the football 
M : 1915— Melican, Dole, Fuller, 
Whorf, Williams, Price; 1916— 
Curran, Darling, Danforth, Perry, 
Plaisted, Palmer, Schlotterbeck ; 
1917— Dav, Grayson. 

ASSEMBLY 

[Continued from page i] 



REQUIRED GYM 
FOOTBALL 



FOR 



WORK 
MEN 

With the view of keeping the heavy 
football men in condition and teach- 
ing them to handle themselves better, 
a new scheme has been devised by 
Professor Hicks with the consent and 
approval of Coach Brides. This 
plan is similar to that which has been 
carried on at the Springfield Y. M. 
C. A. College for several years with 
the greatest success. It provides 
for exercise in wrestling, bar work, 
and basket-ball, at least three hours 
a week and will be carried on under 
i -ompetent instructors. By teaching 
the heavy linemen agility, quickness, 
and versatility it is hoped to pro- 
duce a more aggressive and hence 
a better all 'round team. The work 
will be divided so that men may 
have a choice of two hours of wrestl- 
ing and one of baBket-ball or bar 
work, or they may take one hour 
each of basket-ball, bar work aud 
wrestling. The wrestling will he in 
charge of Fuller '15, and the bar 
work and basket-ball will be under 
the direction of Professor Hicks and 
Assistant Coach Gore. The work 



vestment. Every community must 
have some one thrust himself into it, 
to lead it, to redeem it, and regen- 
erate it. 

"The opportunities along economi- 
cal lines are many, for at the present 
time the farmers are not in close 
enough personal touch with the agri- 
cultural experiment stations, whit-h 
may mean so much to them. 

"There are also many things to be 
done toward the improvement of 
physical conditions which now exist 
iu country life. For this a spirit of 
co-operation is absolutely necessary. 

"The county secretary is fuither- 
more in a position to promote better 
educatioual conditions, and also 
religious conditions, for the chinch is 
the one influence next to the home in 
rural life. 

"The county secretary uses the 
type of leadership which is directed 
to the best advantage of the commun- 
ity, and alnjve all he must have co- 
operation. Fires are burning in the 
social, physical, educational and re- 
ligious life of the boys of today, 
which can never be satisfied until co- 
operation comes to present opportun- 
ities to them. This is the work be- 
fore the county secretary today, and 
in order to be able to carry it on suc- 
cessfully he must possess intense in- 
terest, devotion, sacrifice and love 
for the men and boys with whom he 
will come in contact " 



DOLLAR CHRISTMAS FUND 

[Continued from page i] 



homeless Belgians before the turkey 
on Thanksgiving Day. The needs 
are immeasurable. Let us remember 
that no little nation in the world's long 
history baa been more grievously 
stricken yet not no people can raise 
their heads more proudly from the 
dust. TH E CROWN OF THORNS 
IS STI LL A CRO WN ! Help us as 
beat you can. Your gift will sorely 
be remembered long after the war has 
ceased ami no man's Thanksgiving or 
Christmas Day will be the less happy 
because in some cases the gift may 
entail some measure of personal 
sacrifice. 

Yours very truly, 

Hesry Clews. 
Treasurer, Dollar Christmas Fund 
for Homeless Belgians, 16 Broad 
Street, New York. 



DR. R. C. 

Dentist 

NASH'S BLOCK 

Evening* by Appointment. 



LABROVIT35 

Tailor and Passuca. 

dents' Furnishings -Dress Suits to 

Rent- Drill aioves and Collars 

Ticket System. 
11 Amity .-it . i -i ». ,. ... 



High Grade Furnishings 




e a. n. k. Co., ni4 



Travel the country over and you'll not 
find a choicer or a better line of Men's 
Toggery than you'll find rijjht here. 

The best shirt makers, underwear 
makers, scarf makers and glove 
makers send us these production*. 

The Btst in Every Line 
is Here. 

Then again. «c arc not liigli priced. 
All the patrons •■( tins iturc know 
this to he a fact Test us and see. 

See our new Manhattan and Monarch 

Shirts, $1.50 io $2.50. 

Look at 0U1 Cloves, $1.00 io $2.50. 

See our \ec kwear. 25c '" $1.50. 



Two Hundred Mackinaws Now Ready for Your Inspection. 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



.\ I • I lU'l'Mt 



NOTICE 






Twenty-five cents will be put in a box for tbe 
NEW ATHLETIC FIELD every time you 
buy shoes at our store costing $3.50 or over. 

VERY I.ATFST STYLES. 

Shoes for the Drill- 82.50 to $5.00 



Ke's 



oe Store 



School and College Photographers 




LOCALLY: 



Main Office: 

i 54'' 1 -i --4 s Broidway, 

New York City 



53 Center St.* Northampton, Mass., 

and South Hadley, 

These Studios offer the best skilled 
artists and most complete 

equipment obtainable 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



•BEAI.BRS IN* 



Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 









mm 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 24, *9'4- 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 



Editor-in-Chief 

Managing Editor 

Assistant Editor 

Athletic Editor 

Athletic Editor 



FRANK W. BUELL 'iS. 

TYLER S. ROGERS'io, 

HENRY H. WHITE 'is, 

JAMES A. PRICE'15, 

E. SUMNER DRAPER'iS, 

THOS.L. HARROCKS'i6, Department Editor 

ALFRED A. GIOIOSA*i6, Campus Editor 

FRANK A. SCHEUFELE, Alumni Editor 

MILFORD R. LAWRENCE '17, 

Associate Editor 

RICHARD W. SMITH '17, Associate Editor 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 
MAURICE J. CLOUGH '15. Business Manager 
CHAS A.HUNTINGTON, JR. »i6, 

Assistant Business Manager 
W RICHARDSEARS'iS, Advertising ManVr 
LESTER E. FIELDING Mo, Ass't Adv. MgT. 
BIRGER R. R0SEQU1ST»I7, Circulation 



Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable 
to Maurice J. Clough. 



Entered aa eecond-cleee matter at the Amheret 
Pwt Office. 



Vol. XXV. Tuesday, Nov. 34. No. 11 



sent the interests that this college 
takes In this appeal for charity. 
Such ideas, we believe, should in- 
clude the whole student body. We 
therefore, offer the following plan as 
one that would include the whole 
student body and also be of interest. 
A vaudeville Bhow is something 
that appeals to the college at large. 
We would suggest that the two 
senior societies — Karatid and 
Thesides — make use of some of 
those powers that must exist among 
their members, in order that they 
should be styled honorary societies, 
to organize and run such a show be- 
fore the Christmas vacation. These 
two societies could co-operate with 
the Roister Doisters in arranging the 
program and draw on the Btudent 
body for their material. A small 
admission fee conld be charged and 
those few who could not attend 
would at least buy a ticket and so ex- 
press their interest in the undertak- 
ing. 



REXALL Baby Cough Syrup 



For a young cough. 



REXALL Cherry Bark Comp. 

For your cough. 

Each 25 cents a bottle 



HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The REXALL Store on the Corner 



Next Issue of the Collegian Dec. 8. 

Professor Hickb in bis short talk 
talk recently in era; pel relative to 
securing the right kind of men for 
the entering clasB next fall touched 
on a matter that has been smoulder- 
ing long among the burning issues 
that crowd the blazing hearth of the 
Collegian's editorial writers. The 
editorial that appeared recently in 
these columns in relation to thiB mat- 
ter was not written with the idea of 
running the college or even shaping 
its course to suit our ends but was 
printed in the hope that interest in 
this question might be aroused 
anil action taken. When we con 
aider the athletic field, we believe 
that the right people have taken up 
the matter iu the person of the Physi- 
cal education department. Now it is 
up to every man who has the interest 
of the college in his heart to put 
some effort into securing the men 
that will help the college in the years 
to come. Work by the undergradu- 
ates themselves is necessary in order 
to carry out this plan to its most 
complete fulfillment. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

[Notices for this column should be dropped in 
the Collegiam Office or handed to Alfred A. 
Gioiosa'16, on or before the Saturday preceding 
each issue. 1 

November 25. 

12-00 M.— Thanksgiving recess begins. 

November 30. 

i-io P. M.— Thanksgiving recess ends. 
No chapel exercises. 

December i. 

5-00 P. M. — Sophomore class sing in 

chapel. 
7-00 p. m.— Stockbridge club in South 

College. 
7-ie p. M— Landscape Art club in 

Wilder hall. 

December 2. 

1-10 P. M.— Assembly, Pres. Kenyon L. 
Butterfield. Mass meeting. 

December 3. 
630 P. M— Glee club reheasal in chapel. 
f>-45 p. M.— M. A. C. C. A. in chapel. 

December 5 

6-30 P. M — Social Union. The Apollo 
Quartet. 

December 6. 

0-1 s A. M— Sunday chapel, Rev. Henry 
S. Bradley, Piedmont Con- 
gregational church, Worcester. 

December 8. 

class sing in 



UNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

REGULAR SUNDAY SERVICE AT 7 P. M. 



E. RUSSELL NORTON 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 



MODERN REPAIR DEPT. 



SALES AGENT 



Davenport Miller 
Vein Coal 

Best Quality Pennsylvania Coal 



B.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOFMAH 



BOSTON OPPICE 

8$ Water St. 



NEW VORK OPPICE 

i Broadway 



E. E. MLLETT 

JEWELER and OPTOMETRIST 

Lenses around while you wait 

College Jewelky 

Violin, Banjo. Mandolin and Guitar Strings 

AMHER8T, MASS. 
Next to Post Office. 



Amherst 



CO - OP LAUNDRY 

High-Grade ColUge Work 



Is another column of this paper is a 
note that should draw the attention 
of every man at college to the Bel- 
gian relief fund that has its head- 
quarters in New York. The object 
of this organisation ia to gather con- 
tributions of amall amount* for the 
relief of the suffering Belgians and 
it would seem that this offers an un- 
usually good opportunity to the men 
at this college to show that interest, 
in helping needy humanity, which 
should be characteristic of every 
college man. 

There are many other colleges, at 
present, Aat are taking an active 
intereat in thia question and it is high 
time that Aggie also do something 
along the same linea. Several plana 
suggest themselves as method* where- 
by a fund could be raised to repre- 



5-00 P. M. — Freshman 

chapel. 
7.00 P. M — Stockbridge club in South 

College. 

December 9. 

i-iop. M.— Assembly, Prof easor William 
L. Machmer, M . A. C. 

COUNTRY LIFE CLUB 

Aside from the annual business of 
electing officers, discussions of prom- 
inent issues and extensive field work 
are to be on the program of the Coun- 
try Life club for the coming year. 
In surveying the field of rural life, 
Lincoln '16 touched on a few sub- 
jects relating to country life in its 
economic and sociological aspects. 
Nicholson *16 next spoke on the sub- 
ject of "The Rural Drama." He 
developed the idea of a definite rural 
drama — not a burlesque, but a truth- 
ful estimate of life. The country 
people of the progressive ruralist 
type are dissatisfied with the plays 
they see^at present. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

CURRAN * DYER, Props. 

Loose- Leaf Note Books and Fountain 
—Pens- 



Shirts, 
Collars, 
Cuffs, - 
Plain wash, 
Same, rough dry, 



10-15C 
a i-ac 

% I-2C 

48c per dot. 
- 30c per doz. 



DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, $1.50 a Suit 

R. T. F»osT,A«e«t; D. Shbkinyah, Asst. Agent 
Try our ticket system 

Put full oame and address on laundry 



Come to us for 



Fireplace Goods, Coat and Tronser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Light* and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 



Always glad to see you. 



HUTU, 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 24, 1914. 



The Holyoke Valve £ Hydrant Co. 

Jobbers of Wrought Iron and Brass Pipe Va 
and Fittings for Steam, Water and Gas, Asbe 



Jves 
bestos 



—T ",; !Ii » ir™ 1 ," A *"" "«■ -Tsoesios 

and Magnesia Boiler and Pipe Coverings Hipe 
Cut tojiketch. Mill Supplies. Engineer's and 
Contractors for Steam and Hot Water Heating 
Automatic Sprinkler Systems, Boiler and Engine 
Connections. - - Holyoke, Mast. 



Reserved for 



BECKMAN 



' He*ms* 



» • 



LOW PRICE TAILORING CO. 

SUITS MADE TO ORDER 
Suits Cleaned .Pressed and Dyed. All kinds ol 
Repairing for Ladies and Gentlemen neatly done. 
High-grade work by first class tailor. Work 
called for and delivered. Sell rickets for pressing 

4 SUITS FOR fi.50 

GEORGE KOroWITZ. PROP. 

Main Street, Amherst, Mass. Nash Block 

On your way to the Post Office. Tel. 438- VV 



FLEMING'S SHOE STORE 



Northampton 



For particular people 

THE ELMS RESTAURANT 

213 Main St., Northampton 

(Near Amherst car line) 

A Duality Restaurant at Moderate 
Prices. 

TRY OUR SPECIALS 

And a la carte service. 

OYSTERS STEAKS CHOPS 
FRIED CHICKEN, ETC. 

Open 6 a. m. to 1 1 p. m. 



FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

Orowa by the Florkult urai Dept. 

We offer our surplus stock of cut 
flowers and plants at reasonable rates 
to students and faculty. This stock 
is grown in modern houses under 
ideal conditions. Roses, carnations, 
violets, chrysanthemums and sweet 
peas in season. 

OROWN ON THE CAMPUS 

' ' I'l'honr S#9 



WEBS' 



Everything in Photography 

Including Framing. 
Good work speaks for Itself, 
sh Block, Amherst, Maaa. 



CAMPUS NOTES 

Arthur P. Dunn '17 of Maiden has 
pledged Beta Kappa Phi. 

Edwin C. Selkregg »16 of North 
East, Pa. has pledged Q. T. V. 

The water and gas mains leading 
to the site of the new infirmary have 
now been completed, and work is 
being pushed on a steam main which 
will lend from the Physical Labora- 
tory directly to the Infirmary, a dis- 
tance of about 600 feet. There will 
also be a hundred fout connection 
from the hospital building proper to 
the contagious ward, which will be 
built at one side. 

The annual apple packing school 
of tin- Massachusetts Agricultural 
College was held during the past 
week. The work of the school was 
of a very practical nature and in- 
cluded all phases of commercial pack- 
ing, both of the bos and barrel vari- 
ety. The work in packing was sup- 
plemented by lectures upon spraying 
and care of fruit trees and all prob- 
lems connected with the practical 
side of orchard work. The course 
was limited to 30 students and verv 
nearly the maximum number were 
enrolled. 

Ground has been broken and the 
foundation is being prepared for a 
new building north of the ravine, to 
be used by the Farm Mechanics 
department. The stiiu-tuie will he 
of one story, and will cost in the 
neighlMjrhood of $ 15,000. It is 
planned to erect only one part of the 
building at the present time, the rest 
l»eing added next year; when com- 
pleted it will afford room far both 
laboratory work and for a limited 
amount of class room teaching. Mr. 
Jewett of the heating and lighting 
plant is in charge of the contraction. 
A new publication known as the 
P<mels /W Hem is being received 
each week by the library. This peri- 
odical, although it is in its flrst vol- 
ume and has only been issued for a 
short time, gives promise of much 
future development. It will be par- 
ticularly useful to persons interested 
in the marketing of farm produce by 
mail ; in each number there are 
accounts of what has been done in 
the work of bringing producer closer 
to consumer, and the various eco- 
nomic problems of postal marketing 
are treated in an eminently practical 
fashion. 

Owing to the danger of the foot 
aud mouth disease being carried to 
the farm cattle, the college barns are 
now closed to visitors and students 
alike. A mild form of quarantine 
has been adopted as a precautionary 
measure, and this will probably last 
until the epidemic has been thor- 
oughly stamped out. The enforced 
slaughtering of an infected herd In 
North Amherst last week brings 
home the fact that that there is con- 
stant danger of the disease spreading 
to every corner of the state ; under 
the present regime, however, there is 
little fear that the college stock will 
be affected. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 

Mr. Campion has just returned from England with the 

AQUASCUTUM 

OVERCOATS 
Wells-Margetson Neckwear, Caps & Knitted Vests 

On account of war it will not be possible to gel any more o< 
these goods, so an early inspection will be to your advantage. 

cla.dvt::e=>io2sj" 



Fine Tailoring Men's Furnishings 

See Our Agent! 



Hubbard's BasE Fertilizers 

the most economical you can use. 

BfStIR crops 

are the inevitable reiult. 

THE ROGERS ® HUBBARD COMPANY, Middletown. Conn. 

Offlre nn.l Work., I'.mM. Conn. 




Lize*** 



D»*m*~,>^~ C are supplied every year 

Durpee s deeds i^t » r eAineri 

, * can planters than are 

the seeds of any other growers. Do you know Burpee- 
Quality "Seeds that Grow" ? If not, we would like to 
make your acquaintance. Simply send us your address 
(a postal card will do) and you will receive Burpee's 
Annual for 1914— a bright new book of 1 82 pages, which 
is recognized as "The Leading American Seed Catalog." 
Kindly write to-day! Address 

W. ATLEE BURPEE & CO., Burpee Building., Phuadelphia 



A. SHERARD 



MEN'S STORE 



Use our new cash discount card 
and saye five per cent on 



HATS, CLOTHIN< 



Furnishings and Custom 




C&rptn-ter & Morehous?, 

PRINTERS, 



No. r, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mais. 



I J 




The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 24, iQH- 



JORDAN MARSH COMPANY 

Boston 

TWOGRFVT BUILDINGS-OVER 1 ,000,000 SQUARE FEET 
^FLOOR SPACE-16Q SEPARATE SELLING SECTIONS. 

For Room Furnishings, Wearing Apparel, Unique and 
E * SS aJh^m for Gifts- in fact each of the thousand 
S2e tSS£Sn?2 calls for-this store is the logi- 

S* SiSS W» *> r the college men ° f NeW England ' 

ft Ts filled with just the kind of toggery young men hke. 
All Purchases delivered FREE to Amherst. 

Mail Or tiers given prompt attention. 






I 



VACATION TIME WORK 

Professor Hicks at chapel Monday 
morning briefly outlined plans 
whereby representative men might 
be secured by the undergraduates for 
next year's freshman class. He 
urged the men to use cooperation in 
this work and to use as their main 
argument the personality of the stu- 
dent body at this college. Vacation 
recesses appealed to him as the best 
time to do thi s work. 

METTEWAMPE TREK 

The first regular trek of the season 
was held Saturday afternoon, the 
leader being H. T. Whitney '16; 
about 40 men were present, the ma- 
jority of them freshmen. A good 
pace was kept up through North 
Amherst, past the Hollow pond to 
the paper mills, and thence home 
through Cushman. About five miles 
were covered altogether but this is 
only a hint of the more strenuous 
hikes to take place later. 



the g. S. HYDE 

Hoover & Smith Co^bwelbr^opt.c.an 



616 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 
Diamond Merchants 

Philadelphia's Official Fraternity Jeweler 

SPECIALISTS IN 

Fraternity Badges, Fobs, Novelties, 

Rin«, Charms Prues Troph.es. 

Medal, College Pins, Fobs, Seals, 

Rings, Charms ••• 



Now at 13 Pleasant St. 

Oculists' Pr« S crii,tious Filled. **!!»**"£ 
Accurately Replaced. line Watch Kepamng 
Promptly and .-ikilfully Done. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 



Batchelder & Snyder Co. 

I-VCKKKS. POULTRY DKKHHKK8 
PA AND BtJTTKK NAKKK«. 

WHOLESAtt DEALERS IN 

Cheese. Egg*. Beans. 

Office* Stores IVIM?,*. " &"} »! acks V; n ' St 
rJYltnn P.ckinn Mouse. Brighton. Mass. 
BJ N Uti'/e Poultry K l)ress, nK . Plant. Boston. 
Creameries in Vermont. 



44 



BIDE-A- WEE " 

Creamed Chicken and Waf ties 

Our specialty -And other B ood thin K s to eat. 

MKS. L. M. STEBBINS, 

Middle Street, _ Hadley, Mass. 

Tel. 4i>W 



E. B. DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 
Williams Block, Amherst, Mas* 

Ottice Hours: Q to w A.M.. i-Jo to 5 r>. M. 



"SCOTTIE" 
H. HOOPEB 

Will clean and press your clothes so you 

will be satisfied. 1 1 costs no more 

and he is nearer to "'Aggie. 

MBKRAL TICKKT R\STEM 

Under Columbia Cafe 



R 1 RAM FITTING. Telephone SO-R 

GAS FITTING. TINNING. 

F. W. DANCE * CO.. Plumbera 

Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, Memorial 

Wimiows, Lead UMTS, &c. 

* Clifton Ave.. AMHERST. MASS 



1 mi: ikwi'kv PAW LO U 

<:t«-»n*l»K *»rr*i«lii« B»»alHai 
ijiil.-k.-nt *mrvlc«. Best Work. Lowf.l rrlce 
All woik carefully done. Work called for and 
deli we" L Gents' overcoats. **«*, Pint, and 
coat? Ladies' fine linen suit, a **$*•. 
Teams will call every day at M. A. v.. 

WM. FB.%MKI.I>. I"r..|.. 
Rear Nash BTk, Amherst. Tel No. j4»-4 




Huntington Ave., Exeter and Blagden Sta.. Bo.ton, Maaa. 

Headquarters for College Men when in the cily. 

AMOS M. WHIPPLE. PROW. 



Now is the time to be planning for 

Fraternity Groups 

Have them taken at 

jOSS McCIiELLAN'S STUDIO 

Northampton, Mass 
44 State Street, 



The interclass debates, which at 
one time were scheduled for a date 
previous to Thanksgiving, will prob- 
ably not be held until alter Dec. 1. 
The various teams, however, are 
already prepared with their briefs, 
and a well-argued word feat is 
expected. The subject is as follows : 
"Resolved, that the commission form 
of government should be adopted 
by the cities of the United States." 
The seniors will debate with the jun- 
iors, and the sophomores will fight it 
out with the freshmen ; the winners 
of the two contests will later con- 
tend for the college championship. 
The respective teams are composed 
1 of the following men : '15, I. B- Lin- 
coln, G F. Hyde, W. C. Kennedy ; 
'16, T. L. Hanocks, A. J. Hicks, 
D. F. Barnes; '17, P. C. Stackpole, 
L. D. Kelsey, J. T. Dizer ; '18, D 
M. Lipshires, L. E. Wolfson, H. B. 
Hussell. 

SOCIALIST CLUB MEETING 
Before a small but interested audi- 
euce A. W. Laidler, general agent 
for the inteicollegiate socialist socie- 
ties, gave an informal talk last Wed- 
nesday evening in Room G, South 
College. After explaining the gen- 
eral theories of socialism and its pos- 
sibilities in the line of practical 
application, he pointed out the evils 
of the present economic system and 
gtatcd that sooner or later the social- 
ist idea is bound to be fulfilled. The 
meeting was opened to general dis- 
cussion, and Mr. Laidler spent con- 
siderable time replying to questions 
and objections offered by the stu- 
dents present. At the close of the 
meeting an Informal Socialist Club 
was organised, and attempts will be 
made to secure other speakers in the 
future. 



•08.— "W. F. Tomer, formerly 
Assistant Entomologist at toe Ala- 
bama Experiment Station, Auburn, 
Ala., removed to Vienna, Va. 



THE ROISTER DOISTERS 
At the last meeting of the dramatic 
society it was suggested by Manager 
Nicholson that the Roister Doisters 
take some action in regard to helping 
in the relief work which The Actor's 
Fund of America is doing among its 
stranded members in the war zones, 
many of whom are in great need of 
assistance. This fund is also doing 
work among the families of those 
actors whose families have been left 
destitute because of the way the war 
is affecting the theatrical profession 
all over the world. During the past 
week personal letters from Daniel 
Frohnmn and William Faversham 
have been received thanking the so- 
ciety for their kindness in offering 
assistance in the work, and before 
long definite action is to be taken by 
toe society for accomplishing this 
work which they have offered to do. 

DEPARTMENT NOTES 

The department of floriculture was 
well represented and carried off many 
prizes at the recent flower show held 
at Northampton, onder the auspices 
of the Northampton and Holyoke 
Gardeners' and Florists* Club. Mr. 
James Whiting, who waa in charge of 
the exhibit for toe college and who is 
also secretary of the dub was very 
mock pleased with the showing hi* 
material made. The following prize* 
were awarded to the college : 
6 plants of chrysanthemums 1st 

Largest chrysanthemum flowers 

in the show I* 1 

6 chrysanthemum blooms 1*1 

IS chrysanthemum blooms Urt 

25 chrysanthemum blooms 1st 

Largest collection of named single 
chrysanthemums 1 1 ' 

§5 red rosea 2 " ' 

25 white roses -' ' 

25 pink roses -'" 

25 dark pink carnations fc 



•10.— -Frank H. Partridge, address 
Haiku, Maui, Hawaii. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 24, 19 14. 



COMMUNICATION 

(Communications to the COLLEGI AN concern- 
ing matters of general interest are welcomed. 
The Collegian is not to be held responsible 
for the opinions thus expressed.) 

KnlTOK OF THE COLLEGIAN : 

Dear Sir : 

At the present time there seems to 
be a number of perplexing problems 
arising at Aggie. The next few 
years are bound to bring forth some 
changes if these difficulties are to be 
solved. It is my opinion that one of 
the greatest needs is a change in the 
system that gives such importance to 
the final examinations. There lies 
the cause for most of the wholesale 
1 ribbing which is now bo objection- 
able to the faculty and 1 believe also 
to the student body. For the natu- 
ral tendency of the men is not to be 

■ li-lionest, but with the result of a 
whole semester's work hanging by 
the thread of a final examination the 
temptation is very great. It seems 
hardly just that the preliminary 
< (Torts of the term should count for 
naught. In many courses where 
countless details and statistics are 
encountered, it is practically impos- 
sible for the student to remember all, 
and there is scant time between exam- 
inations to go over the whole ground ; 
nevertheless '-is success in the course 
depends wholly on what he writes 

■ luring a four hour period. 

I offer for a suggestion the follow- 
ing plan : Term work to count one- 



hotel Ularrcn 

South Deerfield, Mass. 



T. xi. AHERN, MANAGER 



SEE and TRY 



01 LAVAL 

We cannot believe that there is a 
sensible man living who would pur- 
chase any other than a DE LAVAL 
Cream Separator for his own use it 
he would but SEE and TRY an im- 
proved DE LAVAL machine before 
lujying. 
It is a fact that 99% of all separator 
buyers who do bEE 
and TRY a DE 
LAVAL machine 
before buying, pur- 
chase the D E 
LAVAL, and will 
have no other sepa- 
rator. The 1% who 
do not buy the DE 
LAVAL are those 
who allow them- 
selves to be influ- 
enced by something other than real 
genuine separator merit. 

Every responsible person who 
wishes it may have the Free Trial of 
« DE LAVAL machine at his own 
home without advance payment or 
any obligation whatsoever. Simply 
ask the DE LAVAL agent in your 
newest town or write direct to the 
nearest DE LAVAL office. 

THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR CO. 




H BroaaHraT 
*iw*ea* 



10 8. M Atii«on St. 

Chicago 



half and final examination one-half ; 
no make-up final examinations per- 
mitted ; any student, whose average 
in a course for the term is below 60% 
must repeat the course. 
Yours truly, 

N. E." M. ex-'16. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

'85. — Dr. Joel E. Goldthwait, sec- 
ond vice-president of the American 
Posture league, is securing much 
prominence in his attempt to have 
installed in Boston the ideal subway 
seat, which was recently designed for 
the Brooklyn Uapid Transit company. 

'94.— Dr. Theodore S. Bacon, who 
has been associate medical examiner 
for this district for nearly seven 
years, has sent his resiguation to 
Governor Walsh. Dr. Bacon's seven 
year term would have expired early 
in December. The reasons for his 
resiguation, Dr. Bacon has stated, 
are that he did not wish to be consid- 
ered a candidate for reappoint- 
ment to the place and that he felt 
that the work of the office required 
him to take too much time from his 
private practice. 

'03. — Stephen C. Bacon, civil engi- 
neer, has changed his address to 64 
Rutgers Ave., Jersey City, N. J. 

'10. — Edward F. Damon is with 
the U.S. Department of Agriculture 
Bureau of Plant Industry investigat- 
ing the causes of decay in citrus 
fruits in the San Joaquin Valley sec- 
tion of California. This past 
year he has been field manager for 
the Upland Citrus association which 
shipped 1200 cars of oranges from 
about 21 nit 1 acres. 

'10.— Dexter K. Bailey, U37 
Campus Avenue, Ames, la., is tnking 
post-graduate work in chemistry and 
acting as assistant in the University 
of Iowa. 

'10.— John N- Everson, 1227 West 
32d Street, Little Rock, Ark., is 
chief chemist with the Arkansas Fer- 
tilizer company. 

Ex-'IO. — Albert Rock wood is as- 
sistant engineer of construction on 
the new Hanover street bridge at 
Baltimore, Md. It is rumored that 
he is to be married shortly. 

•12.— Howard H. (Speedy) Wood, 
address Entomology Laboratory, 
Frederickton,New Brunswick. Leon- 
ard 8. McLaine '10 and he are plan- 
ning to form the M. A. C. club of 
New Brunswick. 

'12. — George S. Fowler is taking 
special courses at the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology. Home ad- 
dress, Wavland. 

'14. — Hoyt D. Lucas, address. 
University Inn, Orono, Me. 

'14. — Arthur Brooks, who has been 
working for the Graselli Company in 
Cleveland, has obtained through bis 
civil service exams a bettor position 
with the Valley Navy Yard in Cali- 
fornia, nine miles from lienicia, where 
"Red'' Norton is working. 



Cbc Pheasant 

Bmttg St., Bin be rat 

Breakfast, Luncheon, 
Afternoon Tea. 

Dinner if arranged for. 
Telephone 470 

Rooms for Transients. 




An Especially Hood Commission Proposition— 

Cash for test orders— Article widely Advi-rtised— 
Cuts down expense in power Hants— Address 
Engineering Suppiy Co., izfi N. 9th Street, 
Philadelphia. Fa. 



'■Teachers Exchange 

Of Boston 1 20 Boylrton St. 

Recommends Teachers, Tutors and Schools 



They'f not short-lived 

The Jerseys 

In 1913 eighteen Jersey 
cows were officially tested 
which averaged 12 years 
and 7 months ol ace. Their 
average milk production 
wasKt 17 pounds. Average 
butter I .!, :o7 pounds. One 
ol Hk e cows was over 18 
years old. 

Longevity. Constitution Qn4 Economic 
Production are Jersey c.i.uu-icnsin.s. 

TIE AMHtlfAN JCKSrV C4TTU HUB 

»4 W. Si St. New York City 




(IJ 



NON-LEAK ABLE 



FOUNTAIN PEN 



E'S $2.50 



^ I * l*** * *^ Minimize your fountain pen 
I V ^^^ troubles by owning a Moore's. 4L It is the 
£/ ^^^ safest, soundest and most dependable pen known. 
^ a^ its strength lies In Its very simplicity. Nothing 
finiky to get ou t of order. Q. You can give your- 
self no better treat than a Moore's Non-leakable. /? 

For Sale by Dealer* Everywhere 

American Fountain Pen Company 

Adams, Pushing ft Foster, Selling Agent* *^s$*, 

lM DEVONSHIRE STREET ii n BOSTON, MASS. 



AND 

UP 




E. Frank Coe Fertilia 

1 OCT THE BUSINESS FARMERS* STANDARD 1Q1/I 
100/ FOR OVER FIFTY-FIVE YEARS ijH 

Do You Raise 300 Bushels of Potatoes per Acre? 

HREE hundred bushels per acre is 
not an unusual yield by any means, 
but did you get it this year ? 
CSIf you were planning to raise 300 
bushels of potatoes to the acre how 
far apart would you space your rows? 

How far apart would you drop the seed pieces in 

the row? 

<IHow much fertilizer would you use to grow 300 
bushels of potatoes per acre? How would you 
apply it ? 

€|Are you sure that your seed potatoes are true to 
name and true to type ? 

•IJWhat are you doing to prevent "scab," and early 
and late blight ? 

•5 Did you have a short crop of potatoes because of 
dry weather ? Have you decided how you will 
overcome this trouble in the future ? 

e] All these practical point*, sad many more, arc fully covered ain our 
new book 

"Potatoes: A Money Crop" 

whicli will be teat free to every potato grower who request* a copy , and 
mention* tht* paper. 

t]This book i* written by a man who himself has bad y*tr% of experience as 
a potato grower, aad who hai made a careful itady ol the best method* of 
Other growers. 

«]lf you read this hook you Will keep It for future reference. Il i» a "worth 
while" publication. 

The Coe-Mortimer Company 

51 CHAMBERS STREET, NEW YORK CITY 






/ 



da"' 




8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Nov. 24, 1914- 



JOIN THE BUNCH AT- 

EPSTEIN'S TAILORING PARLORS 

Now located over post nilice. Up one light 

Pressing and Cleaning a Specialty 

Liberal Ticket System TeL3fi-M 

T. MIEXTKA. 

5H0E STORE 

Shoes Repaired by Machinery 

SHOE SHINE 

Open Sunday from 7-12. On your way to P. O. 



The Highland Hotel 

Corner of Hillman and Harries Streets, three 
bloc Its from the Union Depot, is a modern hos- 
telry run on the European Flan. Jt is just .« step 
from Mam Mreet, away from the noise and dust 
and yet in the center of the business district. 

Its room* are well furnished and comfortable, 
ii.iVin;: a telephone and hot and cold running 
water in every room. Prices VI and up; rooms 
with bath (single) * I .<»<> and up. 

Its excellent cuisine and well ventilated dining 
room makes a meal a pleasant memory— every- 
thing of the highest quality, well cooked and 
served in the best possible manner. 

Stay at the Highland Hotel once and you will 
anticipate staying there again. Music every 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Offers courses of instruction in twenty eight teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



evening. 



D. H. SIEVERS, 



Highland Hold. 



«.|.rifiglii-lil, BUMS. 



STODEHTFUBKITDBE 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New Kn 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 
LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
"■ — absolute lower price. 

Affinthor tmumE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 

E, D. MARSH ESTATE 



COX SONS 



— AND — 



fffl VINING 

72-74 Madison Avenue. New York 

CAPS AND GOWNS 

Best Materials and Workmanship 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 



37 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 



Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 

Agricultural Chemistry 



Agricultural Economics 

Rural Sociology 

Economic Entomology 

Microbiology 

Plant Physiology and Pathology 

Agricultural Education 

Rural Social Science 

For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



FOUNTAIN PENS 

Moore's Swan's 

Waterman's 

Thirty-six dozen pens to select from. 

OUR RULE 



'Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded." 



Associate Alumni, 

Joint Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics, 

M. A. C. Athletic Fie'.d Association, 

The College Senate 



Football Association, 
Baseball Association, 
Track Association. 
Hockey Association, 
Tennis Association, 
Hide club, 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Fifteen Index, 



Nineteen Hundred Sixteen Index, 
M. A. C. Christian Association, 
M. A. C. Catholic Club, 
Fraternity Conference, 
Stockbridgc Club, 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 

C. A. Peters, Secretary 

Philip H. Smith, Secretary 

C. S. Hicks, Treasurer 

E. Towne, President 

J. A. Price, Manager 

S. Prouty, Manager 

B. F. Clark, Manager 

E. S. Draper, Manager 

H. Bishop, Manager 

R. If. Upton, President 

'. F ..N.'/iltnbum P'7".li";iiy r sad-HniiWHW Mamyw 

F. A. Anderson, Manager 
II. M. Rogers, Manager 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



BnuuiiiD 1803 

Stephen Lane Folokb 

MANUFACTURING JEWBUtR 

180 BROADWAY, NEW YOHK 



L. E. Fielding, Mauager 

II. H. White, President 

.1 . E. Harper, President 

F. W. Buell, President 

P. F. Whitmore, President 



There are Seven Good Reasons why youshould 
buy you 1 

COAL 

or 

C. R. ELDER, 



CLUB AND COLLEGE 
PINS AND RINGS 1* 

OOLO, NII.VKR AND BMONZB HID4UI 



RAHAR'S INN 

Northampton, Massachusetts 

TWO BLOCKS FROM THE DEPOT 

The hotel where there is comfort (with- 
out extravagance.) More popular 
than ever. 

Special Luncheon 12-2 P. M. 

PRIVATE DINING ROOMS 

A la Carte Service 
Prom 6-30 to 1 1 P. M . 



ICE CREAM, 



Stationery, | Newspapers, 
Magazines and Col- 
lege Supplies 

A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer. 



The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Mt., alongside the 
famous Bloody Brook battle ground 
to Old Deerfield, thence to Green- 
field, Turners Falls and across the 
"Plains" to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 

50 Miles of Trackage -Jlodern 
Equipment — Train Dispatch- 
ing System- Freight and Ex- 
press Service over entire line. 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
Company 



CARS 



Leave AddlE COLLEQE for HOL- 
YOKE at 1 5 min. past the hour. 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST for AGGIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mln. past the hour. 



Special Cars at 



Rata* 



AMHERST & SUNDERLAND ST. RY. CO 



Clotod only from / A. M. to 4 A. M. 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished eiamples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of '« Gold Medal Uniforms. v 
1434-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa 



For a Daily and Sunday Newspaper j 
You should Read 

TBS 

Springfield Republican 

While you are at college in Amherst. 

It hM all of The K. A. G. Newt 

■I'll.- Best Sporting- News 

Fall General News 

A Strong Editorial Pag-a 

Interesting Features 

It la a Baal Newspaper 

Daily, 3 cents ; 70 cents a month ; #2.oo| 
a quarter. 

Sunday, 5 cents*, so cents a quarter. 

Subscribe by mail or through tht Amherit N "• 





MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL. COLLEGE 



Vol. XXV. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, December 8, 1914, 



No, 12 



POMOLOGY TEAM BRINGS 

HOME HIGHEST HONORS 

Apple Packers and Judges Maintain 

Former Standards at Worcester. 

Rogers Highest Individual, 

On Wednesday, Dec. 3, the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural college apple 
packing and judging teams captured 
that place in competition with teams 
from the other New England State 
colleges, at the Massachusetts Fruit 
Show held at Horticultural Hall, 
Worcester. These two teams, which 
consisted of H. M. Hogers, K. B. 
Parmenter, H N. Bartley, and W. 
C. Kennedy of '15, had little diffi- 
culty in defeating their rivals. 
Rogeis was high man in both contets 
with a judging score of 107 and a 
packing score of 226. Thursday, 
however, the team representing M. 
A. C. finished fourth in the field crop 



INTERESTING CONTESTS 

AMONG BASKETBALL TEAMS 



Great Rivalry Among Glass Teams 

Which are All on Par. New 

Rules Formulated. 

An interesting feature of last year's 
college life was the series of Inter- 
class basketball games. There were 
six games in the series, everyone 
being closely contested and exciting 
to watch. The gameB were great 
drawing-cards, most of the students 
turning out to see them. The 
seniors had easily the best team and 
at the end of the series had the per- 
fect score of 1000, while the remain- 
ing classes all had the same percent- 
age, ,338. Though the team that 
won has now graduated, there is 
excellent material for basketball left 
m college. The 1915 team has 
alwavs shown much class and Meli- 



ALUMNI 
DAY 

MARCH 6, 1915 



VARIED PROGRAM PUNNED 
TO ENTERTAIN GRADUATES 



Fraternity Initiation Banquet* Add 
to Interest. 

Alumni Day which was a new fea- 
ture last year and which was such a 
successful one, is to be repeated this 
year, the probable date for the occa- 



HOCKEY PROSPECTS BRIGHT 
WITH SEVEN LETTER MEN BACK 

Pcinceton on Aggie Schedule for First 

Time. Five Games on Campus, 

Including Williams. 

Manager Draper has announced 
the 1914-15 hockey schedule which 
is as follows : 

Dec. 18, Williams at Williamstown. 
Dec. 19, Rensselaer at 'I'm. v. N. Y. 
Jan. 1, Dartmouth at Boston Arena. 
•Ian. 4, Princeton at Boston Arena. 
Jan. 6, Yale at New Haven Arena. 
Jan. 7, Columbia at New Haven 

Arena. 
Jan. 9, West Point at West Point. 
Jan. 13, Springfield Y. M. G. A. at 

Amherst, 
Jan. 16, M. I. T at Amherat. 
Jan. 30, Springfield Y. M. C. A. 

College at Springfield. 
Feb. 3, Harvard at Boston Arena. 



more route*!, there is but iT 

that it will soon be in our Trophy 

Room. 

During the series of six years that 
the teamB have competed for the 
cups offered for the best New Eng- 
land college team in apple judging 
and packing the M. A. C. team has 
won six or 50^ of all offered. This 
is an exceptional showing. 

The initial appearance of this col- 
lege was in 1909. At this time the 
te:un composed of Sumner C. Brooks 
10 and Walter P. Clarke '10 for 
>>oth the judging and packing teams 
"<h> the Packing cup but lost the 
■lodging to New Hampshire State, 
It was felt that this was a good 
showing although it received little 
lecognition. 

The 1910 team was made up of : 
A. R. Jenks'll and R, C. Barrows 
' 1 1 packing, and Jeuks, Barrows and 
II. J. Baker judging. They won 
hoth of the cups. The 1911 team 
was perhaps one of the best that has 
ivft represented the college but it 
ran into hard luck. The team was 
composed of J. A. Harlow *12, A. C. 
Brett '12, and K. S. Wilbur *12 pack- 
ing, Brett in his Iwx packing flu- 
•died several minutes ahead of his 
nearest competitor but he packed In 
s ready nailed box supplied by the 
tesocfatfon. Aa he took the box 
from the press the bottom gave, 
i Ten ding his pack on the floor. 
This hopelessly handicapped the 



[Continusd on page 5 J 



agile than formerly. Little, Moses, 
Perry, Hall and Darling have played 
excellent ball for 1916 and should 
make a formidable try for the medals 
which will probably be offered by the 
Social Union, Grayson, Squires, 
Hagelstein, Kelsey and Irving will 
fotm a sophomore team that will 
make the freshmen hustle, though 
what the latter class can produce 
remains to be seen, Of course, the 
above men are by no means tare of 
their places on the teams and every- 
one who likes to play should go out. 

The following rules have been 
drawn up to govern this year's inter- 
class series. They are essentially 
like those of last year, but possess a 
few minor changes : 

Rule 1 . The series of games shall 
begin Friday, Jan. 8, and shall con- 
tinue every Friday until the series is 
completed with the following excep- 
tions : there shall be do games the 
week preceding or during mid years 
or prom week. 

Rule 2. The games shall be played 
each evening, the first game to be 
called promptly at 7»00 p. m. 

Rale 3, Each class shall play two 
games with each other class in the 
following order i 1915 vs 1918, 1916 
vs 1917, 1915 vs 1917, 1916 vs 1918, 
1915 va 1916, 1917 vs 1918, This 
order shall be repeated until the 
required number of games Is com- 
pleted. 



(Continued on 



6J 



invitation from the undergraduates of 
M- A. C. to come back on those 
dates to renew old acquaintances, 
revive old memories, and see the 
growth and activities of the institu- 
tion as it is today. Those who were 
here last year will find astonishing 
changes, four or Ave new buildings 
having been started or completed, 
the athletic field leveled off, new 
walks put in, and so on. And those 
who haven't been back for five years 
or ten years may hardly recognize 
the place. But the old Aggie spirit 
sad cheer will be the same and every 
comer will be welcome. Every alum- 
nus should now jot those dates down 
in his memory. He should begin now 
to plan to come. At least twice as 
many as came last year are wanted. 
See which class can produce the 
largest number. 

The features of the program ire as 
follows : 

Friday Evening, March 5th. 
Fraternity Initiation Banquets. 

Saturday, March 6th. 
Hockey it short notice if any ice. 
Entertainment in chapel 8-80—5-30. 
Supper in Draper Hall, 5-80 — 7-80. 
Final games of basketball aeries in 
Drill Hall, 7-45— 

A few words of explanation may 
be necessary. A new rule of second 
semester initiation for all Freshmen 
makes the initiation banquets come 



[C onti nued « 



«l 



There is a possibility or one more 
game with the Boston Arena Inde- 
pendent team. 

With the prospects foi a winning 
hockey team of the brightest, with 
seven veterans and many new meu 
on the squad, and with the finest 
schedule that the college has bad in 
recent years, one of the best hockey 
seasons that the institution has 
ever had teems assured. 

Games have been scheduled this 
year with Harvard, Yale, Dart- 
mouth, Princeton, and Columbia as 
well as with several other teams. A 
game with Cornell at the Boston Arena 
bad to be called off owing to the fact 
that the management of the arena 
refnses to schedule any Cornell games. 
The annual game with Amherst had 
to be given up since the latter college 
has dropped hockey from its list of 
varsity sports. 

The season will open Dec. 12 when 
the Williston team will appear on the 
campus to play the second string 
men. The first game of the regular 
schedule will be played with the 
strong Williams team at Williams- 
town on the 18th, and the following 
day will tee the team lined up against 
Rennselaer at Troy, N, Y. The first 
Dartmouth game Is scheduled for the 
Boston Arena on the first of January 
bat the exact date has not been rati- 
fied by the Arena Management and 
the game may be played on Dec. 81, 
On Jsn. 4, at the Boston Arena the 




















) 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 8, 19' 4- 



first game that has ever been played 
between Princeton ami M. A. C. will 
take place. Ou the sixth the team will 
stack up against Yale at the New 
Haven Arena and on the seventh will 
play Columbia at the same place. In 
I!) 11 M. A. C. was victorous over 
Yale, but laat year no game was 
played. 

January 9th finds the team at West 
Point playing against the soldiers 
and on the 13th they are at home 
against the Y. M. C, A. college. II. 
I. T. appears here ou the Kith and 
Springfield will be met there on Jan. 

80. 

The second semester will open with 
the Harvard game at the Arena on 
the third of February. Last year 
thiB game w:is the best of the season 
and ended in a victory for Harvard 
iu a ten minute overtime period. 
February sixth Dartmouth will play 
a return game <>n the campus. The 
Proa, date of Jan. IS is pending with 
Boston College ou the Campus. The 
final game of the seasou will be 



SOCIAL UNION 

Under the auspices of the Social 
I'liion, one of the most pleasing and 
interesting recitals of old and popu- 
lar songs ever held at M. A. C. was 
given by the Apollo quartet of Bos- 
ton in chapel, Saturday evening. 
The Apollo quartet is well known 
throughout the country, and nat- 
rallv a large attendance turned out, 
the chapel being full when the recital 
began. A varied program of well 
selected songs was rendered in a 
charming mauner, and each song 
was usually followed by a hearty 
encore to which the singers cheer- 
fully responded. Aside from the 
singing, Mr. O'Donnell, who accom- 
panies the quartet as a reader, gave 
several excellent impersonations 
which kept the attendance in a con- 
tinual roar and which were well 
appreciated. 



than he was before. What does 
"inherit the earth" mean, and who 
shall inherit it. It is the poor man 
who knows the beauty of the earth, 
the heavens, and nature — the owner- 
ship of appreciation. The first time 
the phase was used was in connection 
with the "promised land." Von 
Holtzman says, "It became a sym- 
bolic expression for the totality of 
divine blessing." They shall realize 
the great ambitions, the great dreams 
of their life in proportion as they bow 
down in lowliness belore the hand of 
God. 



SUNDAY CHAPEL 
Iu Sunday chapel Hev. H. W 
Pierce of Dorchester gave a most in- 
plavedon the 22nd when Williams I teresting and instructive talk 



STOCKBRIDGE CLUB 

"Ayrshires vs. Guernseys" was the 
subject for discussion at the meeting 
of the animal husbandry section of 
the Stockbridge Club Tuesday even- 

iug. The Ayrshires were supported q ^ ^^ 

by Dole, while the Guernsey breed |™ ^ .^^ ^ ^ „ 
found a fervent advocate in Chester 



He 



will appear ou the campus in a return 
game. 

The schedule is oue of the hardest 
ever arranged for a hockey team, 
with five games on the Campus and 
nine away from home, five of the lat- 
ter being Arena games. The Big 



oboee for his subject one of the 
beatitudes of the fifth chapter iu the 
first Gospel ; "Blessed are the meek, 
for they shall inherit the earth." 
Rev. Pierce's conception of this text 
is as follows : 

"This phraBe must not be inter- 



Four", Harvard, Yale, Princeton and p re ted literally and thus the cause of 
1 >ai •tmouih. are iucluded in this year'a our failure to grasp its true meaning 

ALA .del iajmmh^m<imm"*to ******* 

e del |«tP^t^»J»ta**« '■ 

ilb 



Bishop ; Hotis, as chairman, intro- 
duced the speakers. 

"There are two distinct classes of 
dairy breeds," Bishop stated. "One 
class comprises Holsteins and Ayr- 
shires, while the other includes Jer- 
seys and Guernseys. The Holstein 
is a native of Holland, and together 
with the Ayrshire is useful chiefly in 
the production of cheese and low 
grade market milk. The Ayrshire haB 
been bred more for show than for 
utility, and the same is truej>f the 



ience for the comfort and well-being 
of the sea-faring men of that region, 
was finally erected at a cost of 
$150,000. Although the many small 
rooms in its dormitory rent for only 
25 cents a night, the institution is 
already beginning to pay for itself. 
In addition to the institute, the mis- 
sion maintains two out stations and 
a hospital ship which plies up and 
down the Labrador coast looking 
after the needs of the people. 

Mr. Greene was stationed at the 
outstation of Horse Island, where 
139 people are gathered on a desert 
island 17 miles from the mainland. 
A mail boat touches weekly, and, 
with the fisherman's sailing boat fur- 
nishes the only means of communica- 
tion with the outside world. From 
this mission station the work is car- 
ried to the people of the nearby 

ise be 

entirely isolated from all kinds of 

help. 

Of the work we can only say that it 
is a noble enterprise conceived and 
carried out by an earnest lover of 
men. Of the country, it is said that 
in six dayB the Lord made heaven 
and earth, and all that in tb^m is, 
and on the seventh day he rested and 
threw rocks at Labrador. 



ti. 




be&re'VPV^ftsgTvTng recess by a 
weeks skatiug. and if the ice im- 
proves, the men should be in good 
form for the early season games with 
Williams and R. P. I. 

About "J."" men are out for the 
team, including seven letter men left 
over from last year who are all 
eligible. Last year's defense, includ- 
ing Captain Archibald *15 at point, 
Boss '17 at cover and Buttrick 17 at 
goal should prove more impiegnable 
than ever. In the forward liue 
Johnson '!'>. Wool ley. Chisholm and 
Fernald '10— all letter men of expe- 
rience— should prove a great team 
for offensive work. Woolley '1«>, who 
in book at M. A- C. this year after a 
two years' absence spent in teaching 
the Western farmers the science of 
wheat culture, will be remembered 
l.v the senior^ as one of the quickest 
and scrappiest wings ever seen in a 
Massachusetts uniform. Johnson 
'15 ought to show up as one of the 
speediest forwards in the game, 
while both Chisholm Rod Fernald 
are clever on the line- Wildonand 
Sherinyan '16 :ue hoth cnpable of 
giving anv of the letter men a hard 
rub for a forward position. Several 
other men art showing up well on 
the ice and will have a chance to 
show their ability in tiie M- A. C. 
2nd -Wtlliston game at Easthamp- 
ton on Dec. 1*2, which may have 
quite a little effect on the floe! per- 
sonnel of the team. as the positioMioo 
the team are by no means determined 
as vet. 



earlh? Taken literally we may say 
no, because the highest olHces in any 
aetivity are held by men who are 
noted for their aggressiveness. 
Jesus Himself was a strong enough 
man to make the bitterest enemies. 
We do not understand the true mean- 
ing of this word because we have not 
put ourselves in the place of Jesus' 
hearers. They understood it because 
the word was taken from the Old 
Testament and was common in the 
Hebrew language. It is an idiomatic 
word of a clear cut significance's true 
meaning being one who bows himself 
dowi in lowliness beneath the hand 
of < Jod. Meekness is something that 
ia toward God and uot toward men. 
We never resist or antagonize God 
but we may do so to men. We might 
say that such teaching would sweep 
away all gentlemanliness, but the 
man who follows this teaching is the 
only one to be depended upon in a 
crisis among men. This conception 
of meekness is borne out in Jesus. 
When Christians fight, are they Chris- 
tians? They will be when men, 
nations, and the people ot tne w ° rld 
come to a trne realization of their rela- 
tion to God. 

Now if this phrase holds true that 
the meek shall inherit the earth, can 
this lie promised to ■ man when he 
becomes a Christian f It ought to be 
because beiug a Christian stands for a 
<Warer mind, a greater application of 
mental powers, a better fulfilment 
of duty, and makes him a better man I 



A 



sjiM- rj*t 



i Kaposi lion 



ana dTiheT'an- American r.xposi 
it was the Guernsey which carried off 
most of the honors. Experience has 
shown the Guernsey to be of superior 
usefulness in the production of butter 
and cream." 

In defending the Ayrshires, Dole 
stated that the breed probably origi- 
nated in 80 A. D., when the Romans 
invading Britain crossed their Italian 
cattle with the small black Welsh cat- 
tle. Ayrshires were first brought to 
this country in 1820, and a herd book 
was started shortly after. Emphasis 
was laid on the hardiness of the 
breed, and upon their great adapta- 
bility. The meeting was closed with 
n short informal discussion. 



ATHLETIC BOARD MEETING 

At the regular monthly meeting of 

'collegia te 
je huftioeae 
iWtry let 
Alien. 

Richards and Coley, all of the class 
of 1916. 



>\a-l 

,were awar 



ALUMNI DAY 

[Cpntlnued from page l] 



CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

Thursday evening's meeting of the 
Christian Association waa addressed 
hy T. A. Greene of Amherst College, 
who gave an interesting talk on his 
summer's experiences at the GrenfeU 
mission in Newfoundland. His lec- 
ture was illustrated by a series of 
very good slides giving a good idea 
of the country, and the people under 
the care of the mission. 

The GrenfeU mission is located, 
not as commonly supposed, in Lab- 
rador, but in Newfoundland. The 
principal station is at St. Johns and 
is called the King George V Sea- 
men's Institute. After years of dis- 
couraging work, this building, 
equipped with every sort of conTen- 



at this date. All of the alumni who 
have not visited their fraternities for 
some time will have this opportunity 
to "kill two birds with one stone." 
The banquets are all planned to 
come on the evening of Friday. 

March f>th. 

The plans for the entertainment in 
the chapel are not yet complete. It 
will be of a vaudeville nature. Th« 
various musical organizations and the 
dramatic society will be asked to pro- 
vide part of the numbers. It it 
planned to get some of the gradua- 
ting classes to invent sketches and 
present them on the stage. After 
the supper in Draper Hall, there will 
be songs and speaking. Following 
these there will be some fast basket- 
ball in the Drill Hall. In this final 
game of the series, the Seniors will 
play the Juniors, and the annual 
Sophomore-Freshmeu contest will 

take place. 

Any who have any ideas or sugges- 
tions to present are invited to cor- 
respond with H. H. White, W. H. 
Hatfield, or S. N. Hall, the student 
committee in charge. Let everyone 
co-operate to make alumni day a suc- 
cess for its own sake, and indirectly 
for M, A. C. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 8, 19 14. 



THE 1916 INDEX 

Two hundred and eeventy-tive of 
the 1916 Indexes are here, and will 
be put on sale at 1-00 p. m. Friday, 
Dec. 11th. The sale of these books 
will be open only to those who have 
tickets for the books at that time. 
Such men by presenting their tickets 
and SI. 50 in cash will receive a copy 
of the In dem. 

Two hundred and twenty-five tick- 
ets have been sold to date, leaving 
a margin of fifty tickets left for dis- 
tribution among three hundred or 
more men. Fifty of these men by a 
little exertion can place themselves 
among the favored two hundred and 
seventy-five. The rest will have to 
wait until the 18th of December, be- 
fore the second consignment of books 
is expected to arrive. 

There has been considerable talk 
among the students about getting the 
Imlrj't's here before Christmas, but 
approximately only half the Btudents 
have made any manifest desire to 
have their books by that time, and 
hence the management has made ar- 
rangements with the publishers ac- 
cordingly. The following figures 
show the relative eagerness with 
which the different classes have 
sought after the books. The per- 
centages are approximate. 

1916 62% ; 1918 31% ; 1917 23% ; 
l!H5 14%. 

in« irwli»" of *»n«»s1 %n «i 

The Collegian is not to be tietd res 
for the opinions thus expressed.) 

Kiutok of the Mass. Collegiam : 
Dear Sir: 

At the beginning of the year 1914 
President Butterfield established the 
slogau for M. A. C. of "leadership." 
The spirit of the task has been caught 
up by many of the departments and 
they are now striving to reach the 
goal. Yet with this slogan before 
us there are certain places about our 
campus that do not respond to 
nlvancement. Among these may 
be mentioned the Trophy room. 

Little change iB made in this room 
from year to year. Perhaps another 
liaseball, another football, another 
puck, or a cup is placed on the 
-hehes to gather the dust of months. 

Scattered about the walls of the 
room are numerous pictures of differ- 
ent teams, arranged in no definite 
order ; suspended from the ceiling is 
1 lie old racing shell ; at the north end 
- 1 frame within which hangs a bell ; 
standing beside it are two battle 
leaned flags. In the case oa the east 
side are other flags, some banging 
over rods, and one or two crumpled 
ip in the bottom of the case, while 
in other parts of the bottom are shav- 
ings and pieces of wood, the last 
l»eing far removed from their right- 
' ii place of abode. 

How many of you men in college 

lay have entered this room and 
wondered what the history of these 
"ophles was? How many of you 
have taken visitors into the room and 



had them ask you what is this flag, 
or what's the record of this team, and 
you replied, I don't know? Every 
one of these articles has a history. 
A history, which perhaps cannot be 
said to have entered the realms of 
tradition here at our college, yet but 
a few years hence and we will be 
speaking of these same articles as 
"hoary with age and tradition." 
Bound up in these relies to a great 
extent is the history of our advance- 
ment especially in the "Spirit of our 
College," and it is time that this his- 
tory be gathered up in black and 
white, and placed where all may read 
it. 

Might I suggest that before the 
present senior class graduates some 
action be taken in securing a history 
of the articles in the Trophy room, 
and that this record be attached to 
each article, so that instead of giv- 
ing visitors a casual glance we would 
be proud to take them into this 
room and let them read of our 
advancement. 

Sincerely, 

R. P. lions 'IS. 



DR. R. C. 

Dentist 

NASH'S BLOCK 

Evenings liy Appointment. 



LABHOV1TZ 

Taii.ok AM) Pkksskk. 

dents' Furnishings— Dress Suits to 

Kent— Drill Gloves and Collars 

Ticket Syiti h< 

11 Ainit.v.HI. l*l»«»e»«» 



High Grade Furnishings 



INTER-CLASS DEBATE ON 

THURSDAY NIGHT 

The sophomore team defaulted to 
the freshmen in the series of inter- 
class debates, thus putting the fresh- 
men into the finals. The senior- 
juuiol dahlii a"Tilii tin Thuraliv 




e A.B. K. Co., 1914 



Travel the country over and you'll not 
find a choicer or a better line of Men's 
Toggery than you'll find right here. 

The best shirt makers, underwear 
makers, scarf makers and glove 
makers send us these productions. 

The Best in Every Line 
is Here. 

Then again, we arc not high priced. 
All the patrons of this store know 
this to be a fact. Test us and see. 

See niir new Manhattan and Monarch 
Shirts, $1.50 to $2.50. 

Look at our Cloves, $1.00 to $2.50. 

See our Neckwear, 25c to $1.50. 




the cups'. Handsome silver cups, 
three in number, go to the winners. 
The senior team is made up of K. S. 
Draper, G. K. Hyde and 1. B. Lin- 
coln The junior team is composed 
of S. L. Harrocks, G. N. Danforth 
and A, J. Hicks. The question open 
for debate is "Resolved that the 
Commission Form of City Govern- 
ment should be adopted by American 
Cities." The seniors have the ailirm- 
ntive. A large attendence is desired. 



CERCLE FRANCAIS 

What has been the fate of the 
Cercle Franyais? It flourished for a 
time, gave promise of success, and 
then withered sadly away. At pres- 
ent writing, there seems to be no 
prospect of its resurrection. Is it 
possible that a college of 000 Btu- 
dents cannot support a single 
language club? 

If it is worth while for a man to 
study French, it is worth while for 
him to be an active member of .< 
French club — and the purpose of ■ 
Cercle Franyais is to supply just that 
element of training which the class- 
room all too often fails to afford. 
How many students, upon gradua- 
tion, are able to carry on even the 
thread of a conversation in a foreign 
language? A very small proportion, 
we fear. It is not merely for general 
cultural purposes that a man should 
know hie French or his German ; if 
he intends to enter any form of scien- 
tific work he is sure to And use for a 
"speaking acquaintance" with one or 
both of these languages. 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 

AmlierMt 



! 

Twenty-five cents will be put in a box for tbe 
NEW ATHLETIC FIELD every time you 
buy shoes at our store costing $3.50 or over. 

VRRV LATEST STY I I B. 

Shoes for the Drill- $2.50 to $5.00 



F*«tee'>* 



hoe 



tore 



School and College Photographers . . . 




LOCALLY: 5 a Center St.. Northampton, Mass., 

and South Hadley, Mass. 

These Studio* offer the best skilled 
artists and most complete 

equipment obtainable 



Main OFFICE: 

($46-1548 Broadway, 

New York City 






•, 






l 




JACKSON & CUTLER 



•DEALERS IN- 



Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 








The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 8, 1914- 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 8, 19 14. 



TClTiASSACfflJSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College 

BOARD OF EDITORS 
FRANK W. BUELL Ms, Editor-in-Chief 

TYLER S. ROGERS »i6, 
HENRY H. WHITE '15. 
JAMES A. PRICE'15, 
E. SUMNER DRAPER '15, 
THOS.L. HARROCKS 'i6. Department Editor 
ALFRED A. GIOIOSA'ifi, Campus Editor 
FRANK J. SCHEUFELE, Alumni Editor 
M1LFORD R. LAWRENCE'17, 

Associate Editor 

RICHARD W. SMITH '17. Associate Editor 



Managing Editor 

Assistant Editor 

Athletic Editor 

Athletic Editor 



BUSIHE8S DEPARTMENT 

MAURICE J. CLOUGH'iS, Business Manager 
CHAS A. HUNTINGTON, JR. M6. 

Assistant Business Manager 
W RICHARD SEARS '15. Advertising ManYr 
LESTER E. FIELDINC16, Ass't Ad*. Mgr. 
BIRGER R. ROSEQUIST»i7, Circulation 



Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable 
to Maurice J. Clough. 



Entered aa aecond-dMe matter at the Amheret 
PMt Offta.. 



Vol. XXV. Tuesday, Dec. 8. No. is 



All eommumeationB addressed to 
the Collegian should be Bigned by 
the name of the sender. Otherwise, 
under the present rules of the board 
they cannot be printed. 

Through the carelessness or mis- 
take of some press reporter a basket- 
ball team purporting to be the M. A. 
C, varsity was credited with a bad 

feat at the hands of the 8i>ri 



Freshman rules are made with the 
purpose of keeping the youngest class 
in its place, and to put a check on the 
exuberance of spirit and self import- 
ance of the individuals. The ques- 
tion has been raised as to the extent 
to which the present rules accomplish 
the desired end. If anything their 
fault lies in their impracticability while 
their ad vantages are apparently their 
humor and lack of dignity. A com- 
bination of the desired merits may be 
found in a regulation requiring that 
the freshmen pass upperclassmen in 
single file on all the campus walks 
and in the corridors of the buildings. 
At present freshmen seem to delight 
in walking together in groups and in 
monopolizing the sidewalks. A soli- 
tary passer-by frequently has to step 
off the sidewalk or knock elbows 
with the freshmen in order to pass. 
Now that snow has come, the side- 
walks are in poor condition and are 
narrower than usual. This makes 
such a rule doubly desirable. A 
word to a wise freahman is sufficient ; 
if not, a word to the sophomores 
should do. 



REXALL Baby Cough Syrup 



For a young cough. 



REXALL Cherry Bark Comp. 

For your cough. 

Each 25 cents a bottle 



HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The REXALL Store on the Corner 



UNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 




CAMPUS CALENDAR 

[Notices for this column should be dropped in 
the Collbgiam Office or handed to Alfred A. 
Gioiosa *i6, on or before the Saturday preceding 
each Issue. 1 

December 9. 

1-10 p. M.— Assembly, Professor William 
L. Machmer, M. A. C. 

Decembek 10. 



E. RUSSELL NORTON 



SALES AGENT 



Davenport Miller 



B.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOPMAN 




E. E. MILLETT 

JEWELER and OPTOMETRIST 

Lenses ground while you wait 
College Jew*lkv 

Mandolin and Guitar String 
AKHtMT, MAC*. 



cannot be placed on the reporter, for 
the name of the college must have 
been used, and this is the part to be 
most regretted. When a group of 
men from the college play in a game 
not sanctioned by or under the direc- 
tion of the Athletic Board the name 
of the college should not be men- 
tioned. An effective remedy would 
be to use the name of some club as 
for instance, the Pelican Hub, which 
name neither could uor would be con- 
nected with the college. 



CoMMUHiCaTiONi* are frequently 
received from alumni complaining of 
the lack of alumni news in the Col- 
legian. Some have even said that 
the editor showed no interest in keep- 
ing up the alumni column. We can 
onlv repeat what has been said in 
these columns before, that the co- 
operation of the alumni themselves is 
necessary. Every alumnus receives 
a scrap of news now and then which 
he knows would he of interest to his 
classmates or the alumni as a whole. 
If these bits of news were only sent 
in to the editor there would be suffi- 
cient news to till a couple of columns 
or a psge * week. This news cannot 
b« manufactured offhand. Only 
whole hearted co-operation from the 
alumni can help produce a good sheet. 
We wish to thank those that do 
remember to send in notices, for they 
make tne alumni column a possible 
feature. 



club rehearsal in 



7.30 P. M.— Glee club rehearsal in chapel. 
December ii, 

9-1 s A. M.— Sunday chapel, Reir. Wil- 
liam 1. Chamberlain, Reformed 
church, New York City. 
December 15. 

5.00 P. M.— Freshman class sing in 
chapel. 

7-00 P. M — Stockbridge club in South 
College. 

7-15 p. M.— Landscape Art club in 
Wilder hall. E. J. Canning, 
former professor of horticul- 
ture at M. A. C. will speak on 
uses of Plant Material in Land- 
scape. 

7 30 p. M.— Glee 
chapel. 

7 30 P. M.— Bible class at Dr Chamber. 
Iain's. 

Dkcembek 16. 
1 10 P. M. -Assembly, Jewell K. Knight 
'92, Belchertown. 



MUSICAL CLUBS 
According to the present indica- 
tions the college will be represented 
by its best Glee Club this ysar, in 
spite of the toss of so many men by 
graduation. A large and varied 
number of songs have already been 
selected and worked on, in anticipa- 
tion of the Christmas trip, which is 
to be in the eastern part of the state, 
in the vicinity of Boston. The Man- 
dolin Club *ls to receive its main 
development after Christmas when a 
call will be made for all men who 
can play a stringed instrument. At 
present, Farrar is rounding it into 
shape for the trip, and weekly prac- 
tice ts held in the chapel. 



BOSTON OPPICE 

85 Water St. 



NEW YORK OFP1CE 

1 Broadway 



Amherst 



CO-OP LAUNDRY 



The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

Jobbers of Wrought Iron and Brass Pipe, Valves 
*nd Fittings for Steam, Water and Gas, Asbestos 
and Magnesia Boiler and Pipe Coverings, Pipe 
Cut to Sketch, Mill Supplies. Engineers and 
Contractors for Steam and Hot Water Heating, 
Automatic Sprinkler Systems, Boiler and Engine 
f onnections. - - Holyoke, Mass. 



I*«~»**r"v*?<l lor 



BECKMAN 



1 1 < 1 ■ • 1 1 > ' 



LOW PRICE TAILORING CO. 

SUITS MADE TO ORDER 
Suits Cleaned, Pressed and Dyed. All kinds of 
Repairing for Ladies and Gentlemen neatly done. 
Hieh-grade work by first class tailor. "Work 
called for and delivered. Sell tickets for pressing, 
4 suits Mir ii.;o 

GEORGE KOTOWITZ, Prop. 

Main Street, Amherst. Mass. Nash Klock 
1 in your way to the I'nst Office. Tel. 4#-W 



FLEMING'S SHOE STORE 



Northampton 



For particular people 

THE ELMS RESTAURANT 

213 Main St., Northampton 

(Near Amlieist cai linel 

A Quality Restaurant at Moderate 
Prices. 



High Grade College Work I TRY QUR SPECIALS 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



CURRAN ft DYER, Prop*. 

Loom- Leal Note Books and Fountain 
-Pens— 



Shirts, 
Collars, - 
Cuffs, • 
Plain wash, 
Same, rough dry, 



10-150 

% l-SC 

% l-JC 

48c per dog. 
30c per doz. 



DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, $1.50 a Suit 

R.T. FaoST,Agent 1 D.SHKRinvAW.Asst. Agent 
Try our ticket sf stem 

Put full name and address on Isundry 



Come to us for 



Fireplace Goods, Coat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils IWEBSTER'S STUDIO 

J " Puoruthino in Dhntnuranhw 



And a la carte service. 

OYSTERS STEAKS CHOPS 
FRIED CHICKEN, ETC. 

<>pen 6 A. m. to 1 1 p.m. 

FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

Omm by the Floricultural Dept . 

We offer our surplus stock of cut 
I flowers and plants at reasonable rates 
udents and faculty. This stock 
lis grown iu modern houses under 
[ideal conditions. Roses, carnations, 
[violets, chrysanthemums and sweet 
in season. 

QROWN ON THE CAMPUS 

r*!«'j»hon«- 300 



Always glad to see you 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 



Everything in Photography 

Including Framing. 
Qood work speaks for Itself. 

Block, Amherst, Mass. 



GIFT TO COLLEGE 

Through the kindness of Kdward 
1$. Wilder of Dorchester, and Mrs. 
Nancy J. Bigelow of Southhoro, the 
Division of Horticulture has ivceived 
a fine- plaster bust of the late .Mar- 
shall P. Wilder for whom Wilder hall 
is named, together with a pedestal 
for the same. Marsha.ll P. Wilder 
was the first trustee for M. A. C. ami 
was chairman of the board of trus- 
tees until the time of his death °1\\ 
vears after the opening of the college. 



RESOLUTIONS 



Wkereas % The Board of Trustees of 
die Massachusetts Agricultural college 
is saddened by the death of its late 
Uean, I'rof. George V. Mills, and desires 
to give enduring expression to its appre 
cialinn of his high character and faithful 
servicrs as an officer and instructor in 
the College. 

Resolved, Thai l>y his death the Col- 
lege loses an invaluable officer who for 
24 consecutive fears has with rare intel- 
ligence, fidelity and unfading courtesy, 
facilitated ihe success of the College, 
and the community lost s a true gentle- 
man and an exemplary citizen. 

Resolved, That the Trustees of tlir 
( olltge commend the * sample present d 
l>y Ins long and honorable career to all 
who aspire to render unselfish and de- 
voted service in education.il work. 

A'eso/ved, that a copy of these rcsolu- 
tions be transmitted to the family of the 
late Uean, to whom this Board extends 
its profound sympathy in their bereave- 
meni, and that a copy be placed on the 
recoids of the Board 



APPLE PACKING TEAM 
Conttmtod from ji.inf i| 

team and I hey lost. The judging 
team also lost, so that neither of the 
cups came to M. A ('. The 1918 
team was more successful. The 
packing testa, K. J, N e »i *,a, .1. \v. 
Davtoa 'lS a L. P. Duty 'l."l, easily 
won their trophy, receiving besides a 
high compliment from the judges for 
their general good work. The other 
team, made up of K. S. Fny *l"» and 
B. W. Ellis '13, lost tin-it event. 

The next year both the packing 
team. B. K. Nute Ml, A. K. Stevens 
M4 and A, L. Tower M4, and the 
judging team. Nut. . Stevens and K. 
M. Ingham, lost both matches. 

For the enviable record of this 
year's team Its thanks to Professor 
Sears and other members of the 
department of Pomology for their 
able training and careful coaching, 
also to the members nf the team for 
I heir conscientious efforts, 

The teams finished as follows : 



I. 
2. 
8. 



I. 
t. 

:i. 
4. 



API'I.R JUIWIMO. 

Massachusetts. 
New Hampshire. 
Maim 

AWLF, FAtmifO. 

Massachusetts. 

Vermont. 

New Hampshire. 



Maine. 

KIKI.D CHOPS 



irooiNr,. 



1. New Hampshire. 

2. Rhode Island. 

3. Maine. 

4. Massachusetts, 
fi. Connecticut. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 



Mr. Campion has just returned from England with the 

AQUASCUTUM 

OVERCOATS 
Wells-Margetson Neckwear, Caps & Knitted Vests 

On account of war it will not be possible to get any more of 
these goods, so an early inspection will be to your advantage. 




Fine Tailoring 



Men's Furnishings 



-See Our Agents 



..r.»t.'*«>«» l« 



Hubbard's BasE Fertilizers 

the most economical you can use. 

BSSSR CROPS 




^ftTILlZES*^ 



are the inevitable result. 



THE ROGERS * HUBBARD COMPANY, Middletown, Conn. 

Office Htiil Work*. I'orttAnd, Conn. 



Burpee' 



the seeds of any other gro 
Quality "Seeds that Grow" ? If not^ we would like to 
make your acquaintance. Simply send us your address 
(a postal card will do) and you will receive Burpee's 
Annual for 1914,— a bright new book of 182 pages, which 
is recognized as "The lading American Seed Catalog." 
Kindly write to-day! Address 

W. ATLEE BURPEE & CO., Burpee Buildings, Philadelphia 




A. S 



MEN'S 




Use our new cash discount card 
and save five per cent on 

SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING 

Furnishings and Custom Tailoring 



Carpenter & Morehousf, 

PROTEUS, 



No. i, Cook Plsce, 



Amherst, Msss. 







. I ' 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec, 8, 1914- 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 8, 19 14. 






3 



JORDAN MARSH COMPANY 

Host on 

TWO GREAT BUILDINGS— OVER 1,000,000 SqUAKE FEET 
OF FLOOR SPACE— 169 SEPARATE SELLING SECTIONS. 

For Room Furnishings, Wearing Apparel, Unique and 
Practical Articles for Gifts- in fact each of the thousand 
and one things student life calls for- this store is the logi- 
cal shopping place for the college men of New England. 

Our Clothing and Furnishings Store is just a step from 
Summer Street. Do not fail to vi.<it when you are in Boston. 
It is filled with just the kind of toggery young men like. 

All Purchases delivered FREE to Amherst. 
Mail Orders give* />/<>»//>/ attention. 



Uule 12. Kubber-soled shoes are 
to be worn at all times on the gym 
floor. 

Rule 13. Any protest or exception 
to these rules shall be decided by the 
committee of basketball managers. 
Signed, committee of managers : 
H. H. White, Senate chairman* 
E. R. Bartlett, Manager for 1916. 
C. W. Nash, Manager for 19K!. 
A. W. Spaulding. Manager for 1917. 
P. K. Hunnewell, Manager for 1918. 
Harold Gore, Physical Education. 



THE 



Hoover & Smith Co. 

616 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 
Diamond Merchants 

Philadelphia's Official Fraternity Jeweler 

SPECIALISTS IN 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTlCIAfs 

Now at 13 Pleasant St. 
Oculist*' I'rescriptious Killed. Ilroken lenses 
Accurately Replaced. Hue W'alcli Kepamnn 
Promptly and .skilfully Donr. 

Satislaction Guaranteed 



Fraternity Badges, Fobs, 
Rings, Charms Prizes 



Novelties, 



« BIDE-A- WEE 



M 




Creamed Chicken and Waffles 

And other good things to f.it. 

. L. M. STEBBINS, 



et, 



Tel. 415-W 



Hadley, Mass. 



NOTICE TO COMPETITORS 
All competitors are required to get 
assignments at the (.'OU.BQUX Office 

on Tuesdays at 12-50 p. M. 



BASKETBALL RULES 



P V< KKIts, POUI.TKV imrHSEKS 
AND BUrTKK HAKEKIv 

WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

rWei Mutton, Lamb, Veal, Pork, Lard, Hum*. 

Bacon. Sausage*. Poultrv. Uame. Butter 

Cheese, Egga. Beans. 

1 )flce & StoM* U.!!.*.M», Ji & *>} Black*tone St. 

B»*ton Picking 'louse, linahton, Mass. 

Natl/e Poultry Dressing Plant, Boston. 

Creameries in Vermont. 



"SCOTTTE" 
H. HOOPER 

Will clean and press your clothes so you 

will be satisfied. It costs no more 

and he Is nearer to 'ARgie." 

LtMftAl titkrt svsti-m 

Under Columbia Cafe 



E. B. DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 

Williams Block, Amherst, Ma*s. 

Office Hours: Q to 12 a.m.. i #> to 5 f. M. 



■TEAM KITTING 
GAS FITTING. TINNING. 



Telephone SO— K 



F. W. DANCE A CO., Plumbers 

Specialty of Kepairing 

Chukch Wimjows, Memorial 
Windows, Leaf) LIGHTS. &c. 

*> Clifton Ave.. A M H F.RST. M ASS. 



THK TI5i»**r»lir»*V PAWMIH 

< i.-:«h«iii« Fr.<»»liig- rh>|iMlrlna > 

on 1. u.-i -.-i ii. .1 Work, LowiiM Prlee 

All woik carefully done. Work called for and 
delivered. Gents* overcoats, suits, pant* sad 
coats. Ladies* tine linen *uit* a specialty 
Teams will call every da? at M. AC. 

WM. 1 1: \m* 1 1 n Prop- 
Rear Nash Bl'k. Amherst. Tel No. 34a* 



Huntington Ave., Exeter and Blagden Sts., Boston, Mass. 

Headquarters for College Men when in the city. 

AMOS H. WHIPPLE, psop 



Now is the time to be planning for 

FraternityGroups 

Have them taken at 

MISS McCLELLAlTS STUDIO 

44 sute Street, • • North.mpton, M««. 



[Continued from page 1] 

The following is. a tentative sched- 
ule Jan. 8 and lf>, Feb. 5, 1!», 86 
and March (5 : 

Rule 4. The class which shall 
have won the greatest perceut.igo of 
games in the series shall win the bas- 
ketball championship of Ihe college 
Rule ">. If two classes have the 
same percentage the classes thus tied 
shall determine the championship Ity 
one deciding game. 

Rule '■ In case one team shall 
fail to appear at the appointed hour 
on the scheduled date the rtfefCC 
shall declare the game forfeited to 
the opposiug team. In case Ixitli 
teams fail to appear one lost game 
shall he scored against class. 

Rule 7. There shall he two ollic- 
ials for each game. 

Wide H. The officials snail he 
mutually agreed upon by the two 
class managers. 

Rule 11. Kaeh manager shall hand 
in to the Physical Kducution depart- 
ment a list of all men expecting credit 
for Physical Kducation by taking 
part in practices and playing in the 
games. These credit reports must 
be made weekly. 

Rule 10. The following nights 
are appointed for the use of gym for 
practice 1 Wednesday, Juniors and 
freshmen ; Thursday, seniors and 
sophomores. The practices art 
scheduled to begin at 6-30 and close 
prora»tivst8«(K) p m. It Is expected 
that the floor will be clear Wednes- 
day sod Thursday nights at a-00 for 
the wrestling and heavy gym work of 
the football men. 

Rule 1 1 . The last game of the 
series shall be considered the An- 
nual Sophomore-Freshman basket- 
ball game. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

The Chemical Department of the 
Experiment Station is carrying on a 
great deal of work along both con- 
trol and research lines. 

About 1,000 samples of feedstuffs 
are collected annually ; the results of 
the last inspection have recently 
I km 11 issued in bulletin form. Home 
1 ,300 samples of fertilizers are also 
collected each year ; the bulletin giv- 
ing the results of the inspection is 
now in press. For the past two sea- 
sons Vincent Samhelli has assisted 
during the summer month in the fer- 
tilizer work and has obtained consid- 
erable experience in fertilizer analy- 
sis. It is intended, if circumstances 
permit, to take on during the sum- 
mer months at least one man for thi* 
work who has been especially trained 
in chemistry. 

Work in cow testing is also car- 
ried on although more or less inter- 
rupted by stale quarantine. Three 
men are regularly employed iu mak- 
ing the yearly tests of Jersey, 
( iininsey. and Ayrshire herds. Pur- 
in<; the late winter and early spring 
a large number of applications art 
received from ilolsteiu-Friesian 
breeders for weekly tests. It is 
hardly possible to secure men to do 
this work. 

In addition to the above-mentioned 
control work | Dumber, of problems 
are under constant investigation bv 
this department. Among these may 
be mentioned work on the potash 
content of the soil at different 
depths ; just now a study of the typ- 
ical soils of the state with regard t«> 
potash content is under way. An 
investigation relative to the chemis- 
try of the asparagus and eranbeny 
crop has been in progress for consid- 
erable time ; also the effect of vari- 
ous forms of fertility upon the com- 
position of these crops. 

The availability of organic nitro- 
gen in different commercial fertiUstn 
is likewise being studied both by lab- 
oratory methods and pot experi- 
ments. Among other problems be- 
ing investigated may be mentioned 
the chemical composition of butter 
especially ns modified by different 
methods of feeding and ihe digesti- 
bility of cattle feeds. 

During the year Messrs. Holland. 
Morse, Haskins and Smith give spet- 
ial lectures to chemical students rel- 
ative to the work in progress in th • 
department. 



J. GIIVSBURG 

11 1-2 Amity Street 

Modern Shoe Repairing 

ANNOVMI 1 M, 

75c Special Half Sole, Rubber 75 c 

ur:i-.\iivi\(. 
Mack, Tan, White Work > iti.11 anteed. 

1 'Kit 1 •;«-. 

K-ibber Soles WI..~>o 

Rubber Soles, with Heels . . , SI. 75 

Soles Sewed, ..... TSb 

.» i SIiIik-n for at.ixt 



hold Ularrcn 

South Deerfield, Mass. 

T. J. AHERN, MANAGER 



5 



FOI TIUH DEI fi 

Beautiful College Pennants U 
YALE and HARVARD, 

Each 9 in, x 24 in. 

PRINCETON, CORNELL, 
MICHIGAN, 

Each 7 in. x 21 in. 

4 Pennants, Size 12 x 30-4 

Any Leading Colleges of 

Your Selection 

All of our best quality, in (heir 
proper colors, with colored emblems. 

Either assortment, for limited time, 
sent postpaid for 50 cents and five 
stamps to cover shipping costs. 

Write us for prices before placing 
orders for felt novelties of all kinds. 

The Oem City Novelty Co., 

402 Hittner Street, 
Dayton, - - Ohio. 



SEE and TRY 

01 LAVAL 

We cannot believe that there is a 
sensible man living who would pur- 
chase any oiher than a DE LAVAL 
1 team Separator for his own use ii 
he would but SEE and TRY an im- 
proved DE LAVAL machine before 
'niying. 
It is a fact that 99% of all separator 
buyers who do SEE 
and TRY a D E 
LAVAL machine 
before buying, pur- 
chase the DE 
LAVAL, and will 
have no other sepa- 
rator. The 1% who 
do not buy the DE 
LAVAL are those 
who allow them- 
selves to be influ- 
enced by something other than real 
I nuine separator merit. 

• very responsible person who 
wishes it may have the Free Trial of 
a HE LAVAL machine at his own 
''■•me without advance payment or 
obligation whatsoever. Simply 
the DE LAVAL agent in your 
• - arest town or write direct to the 
1 rarest DE LAVAL office. 

THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR CO. 




Broadway 
rwvomt 



at E, Madison St. 

CHICAGO 



BOSTON KVEN1NO LECTURE COURSES. 

In answer to increased demands 
from metropolitan Boston for some 
definite instruction along agricultural 
lines u series of eveuing courses was 
planned and carried out, the college 
aud the Boston Chamber of Com- 
merce co-operating. These courses 
have proved a great success and the 
attendance and interest has been far 
beyond espectatious. Six courses 
have so far been offered, each course 
consisting of one lecture and discus- 
sion per week for five consecutive 
weeks, and three courses being carried 
on simultaneously. The first five 
weeks terminated Nov. 14 and the 
second group of three courses began 
Nov. 17. 

The courses offered and the regis- 
trations in each on Nov. 19 were as 
follows : 

Soils, 208, I'rofessor Haskell 

Field crops, 10«, 

Professor. McDonald 
Fruit growing, 219, 

I'rofessor Chenoweth 
Flower growing, 166, 

I'rofessor Nehrliug 
Vegetable growing, 1119, 

Mr. Thompson 
Poultry, "27*, Professor. Graham 

Intense interest has been mani- 
fested at every lecture aud with the 
above registration could have been 
increased greatly if there had been a 
longer period for publicity before the 
courses opened. Other courses are 
tentatively planned for the late win- 
ter, after the cIobc of the ten weeks 
course at the college. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

'01. — An endeavor has been made 
to raise 1200 for the M. A. C. 
Athletic Field among the members 
of the class. The movement was 
started at a little reunion of those 
members of the class present at the 
Springfield game : Charles L. Rice, 
William K. Dawson, Thomas Casey, 
and James II. Chickeriug. 

*06.— Herman A. Suhlke, K 5, 
died Nov. 15 at Harper hospital, 
Detroit, Mich. 

Ex-*07.— Charles A. A. Kice has 
returned from Chicago to Springfield, 
where he will be associated with his 
father in the manufacture of tinware. 

*0a.— William F. Sawyer has re- 
moved from Worcester to his former 
home at Oakhurst Farm, Sterling 
Junction. 

*09.— Uockwood C. Lindblad has 
moved from Albady to 805 N. Second 
street, Clearfield, Penn. 

*12. — Arthur N. Kavraond has re- 
moved from Pittsburg, Penn. to 14 
Pearl street, Leominster. 

*14.— "Stan" Freeborn, "Art" 
Brooks, and "Red" Norton held a 
Thanksgiving reunion in Berkeley, 
Cal. 

'14.— Arthur W. Brooks, address, 
411 Virginia St., Vallejo, Cal., is 
now assistant chemist at the Mare 
Island navy yard. 



Che pheasant 

Bnutv St., Bmbcrat 

Breakfast, Luncheon, 
Afternoon Tea. 

Dinner if arranged for. 

Telephone 470 

Rooms for Transients. 

theTeachers Exchange 




An Especially Uood Commlaalon Proposition— 

Cash for test ordcts— Article widely Advertised— 
Cuts down expense in power i>lants— Address 
Engineering Supply Co., m$ N, yth street, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



Of Barton 



1 10 Bttylston St. 



Recommends Teachers, Tutors and Schools 



** They're not short-lived 

The Jerseys 

In 1913 eighteen Jersey 
cows were officially tested 
which averaged 12 real* 
and 7 months of are. Their 
average milk production 
wai Si !7 pounds. Average * 
butter I it, 387 pounds. One 
of in. e cows was over 18 
years old. 

Longevity, Conrtltution vrA Economic 
Production are Jers.y ciai-Ktenstits. 

THE AMEKIC/tl* JtKStY CATTLE CLDI 
S24 W. 234 St.. New York City 





M(5)RE'S~£i 



INON-LE AK ABLE 



FOUNTAIN PEN 

Minimize your fountain pen 



f V ^^^ troubles by owning a Moore's. C It Is the ' 
«Jy ^^^ safest, soundest and most dependable pen known. 
^ C. Its strength lies in its very simplicity. Nothing 
flnlky to get out of order. C. You can give your- 
self no better treat than a Moore's Non-leakable. /t 
For Salo by Doalcra Everywhere 
American Fountain Pen (ompan 

Adams, Cushlni ft PtMtar, Selling Agents ^jSS 

168 DEVONSHIRE STREET ;; it BOSTON. MASS. 






UP 




E. Frank Coe Fe 

1 OCT THE BUSINESS FARMERS' STANDARlP 
IPO* FOR OVER FIFTY-FIVE YEARS 

Do You Raise 300 Bushels of Potatoes per Acre? 

HREE hundred bushels per acre is 
not an unusual yield by any means, 
but did you get it this year ? 
Qlf you were planning to raise 300 
bushels of potatoes to the acre how 
^ far apart would you space your rows? 
How far apart would you drop the seed pieces in 
the row? 

CJHow much fertilizer would you use to grow 300 
bushels of potatoes per acre r 1 How would you 
apply it ? 

■QAre you sure that your seed potatoes are true to 
name and true to type ? 

-tJWhat are you doing to prevent "scab," and early 
and late blight ? 

-tJDid you have a short crop of potatoes because of 
dry weather ? Have you decided how you will 
^overcome this trouble in the future ? 

<JAII Iheae practical poiatt, and many more, are lully covered an our 
new book 

"Potatoes: A Money Crop" 

which will be sent free to every potato grower wbo requests ■ copy, sad 
mention* ihit paper. 

0Thi« book it written by a nsa who him»elf ha* had year* of experience at 
a potato grower, and who baa made a careful ntudy of the hew methods of 
other growers, 

tjlf you read thit book you will keep it for future reference It iv a "worth 
while" publication. 

The Coe-Mor timer Company 

51 CHAMBERS STREET, NEW YORK CITY 




! 



$ 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 8, 1914. 



JOIN THE BUNCH AT 



EPSTEIN'S TAILORING PARLORS 

Now located over post uttice. Up one flight 

Pressing and Cleaning a Specialty 

Liberal Ticket System Tel. 36- M 

T. MIENTKA. 

SHOE STORE 

Shoes Repaired by Machinery 

SHOE SHINE 

Open Sunday from 7-12. On your way to P. O. 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Offers courses of instruction in twenty-seventeaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects : 




The Highland Hotel 

Corner of Hillman and Barnes Streets, three 
blocks from the Union Depot, is a modern hos- 
telry run on the European Flan. It is just a step 
from Main Street, away from the noise and dust 
and yet in the center of the business district. 

Ill rooms are well furnished and comfortable, 
having a telephone and hot and cold running 
water in every room. Prices SI and up; rooms 
with bath (single) Sl.50 and up. 

Its excellent cuisine and well ventilated dining 
room makes a meal a pleasant memory— every- 
thing of the highest quality, well cooked and 
served in the best possible manner. 

Stay at the Highland Hotel once and you will 
anticipate staying there again. Music every 
evening. 

D. H. SIEVERS, 

HigliUiHl Hotel, Springfield, MM*. 



ST00EHTFUBH1TUBE 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENS ES Enable us 
|d <4fe( l -^k>fe0 v ^9t> Jpwer price. 

AMHERST 'FURNITURE 

AMD 

CARPET ROOMS 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 



Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 

Agricultural Chemistry 



Economic Entomology 

Microbiology 

Plant Physiology and Pathology 

Agricultural Education 

Rural Social Science 

For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



FOUNTAIN PENS 

Moore's Swan's 

Waterman's 

Thirty-six dozen pens to select from. 

OUR RULE 



Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded?" 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



E, D. MARSH ESTATE 



"iflF COX SONS 

JHHl VINING 

71-74 Madison Avenue. New York 

CAPS AND GOWNS 

Best Materials and Workmanship 

WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

s; Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



Associate Alumni, 

Joint Committee on lutercollegiate Athletics, 

M. A. C. Athletic Fie'd Association, 

The College Senate, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Rifle club, 

Roister Doisters 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Fifteen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Sixteen Index, 

M. A. C. Christian Association, 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Stockbridge Club, 



.1. F. Nicholson, Prod 



C. A. Peters, Secretary 

Philip H. Smith, Secretary 

('. S. Hicks, Treasurer 

E. Tow ne, President 

J. A. Price, Manager 

S. I'routy, Mauager 

E. F. Clark, Manager 

E. S. Draper, Mauager 
H. Bishop, Manager 

U. M. Upton, President 

Being and Busiuess Manuger 

F. A. Anderson, Manager 

II M. Rogers, Manager 

L. E. Fielding, Manager 

H. H. White, President 

J. E. Harper, President 

F. W. Buell, President 
P. F. Whitmore, President 



K-.IABI.1BMH. lSSa 

Stkimikn Lank Foloeh 

MANUrAUTURINO -IIVV 1. 1. IK 

180 BKQADWAY, NEW YORK 

OI^UB AND COLLEGE 
PINS AND KINGS 1* 

UlH.ll. MII.VKK AKD BRONZM MHOAI x 



There are Seren Good Keasonswhy y..u*hould 

1)U \ your 



KAHAR'S INN 

Northampton, Maaaachuaetta 

TWO BLOCKS FROM THE DEPOT 

The hotel where there is comfort (with 
out extravagance.) More popular 
than ever. 

Special Luncheon 12—2 P. M. 

PRIVATE DINING ROOMS 

A la Carte Service 
Prom 6-30 to II P.M. 



COAL 



or 



C. R. ELDER 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 

• ICE CREAM, 



Stationery, Newspapers, 
Magazines and Col- 
lege Supplies 

A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer. 



The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Mt., alongside the 
famous Bloody Brook battle ground 
to Old Deerfield, thence to Green- 
field, Turners Falls and across the 
"Plains'* to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 

50 Mile* of Trackage -flodern 
Equipment — Train Dispatch- 
ing Sy sun— Freight and Ex- 
press Service over entire line. 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
Company 



CARS 



Leave A(KJIE COLLEGE for HOI • 
YOKE at 15 min. past the hour. 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST for AQOIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mln. past the hour. 

SpacaU Car* at 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 



M 



Chudmfypnm I A. M. at 4 d* if. 



For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Son 

Makers of " Gold Medal Uniforms. 
1424-1436 Chestnut St., 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



nIHERSI & SUNDERLAND ST. RY. CO 



For a Daily and Sunday Newspaper I 
You should Read 

THIS 

Springfield Republican 

While you are at college in Amherst. 

It bH all »( The >i A. C. Newa 

The Beat Sportlnc; Kawa 

Full < »♦■"»' <"»! Rawi 

A Strong- Editorial Fat* 

Interesting restore* 

It la a Real newspaper 

Daify, 3 centt ? ye cents a month ; $i.c 
a quarter. 

Sunday, 5 cents; 50 cents a quarter. 

Subscribe by mall or through the A mhertt N =' 








MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXV. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, December 15, 1914. 



No. 13 



DEBATING SERIES ENDS 

WITH FRESHMEN AHEAD 



Seniors Lose Title in Final Debate. 

Draper and Russell Show 

Best Talent. 

The final debate of the inter-class 
series held Monday night in the 
chapel was awarded by a unanimous 
decision of the judges to the fresh- 
man team. This leaves the seniors 
with one victory and one defeat, the 
juniors with one defeat and the 
freshmen with a perfect score. The 
ai Urinative of the question : resolved 
that American cities should adopt 
the commission form of government, 
was upheld by the seniors, the nega- 
tive was maintained by the fresh- 
men. Professor Sprague presided. 
The judges were Dr. Cance, Mr. 
Baird and Mr. Rand. 

In the constructive speeches 
Draper '15 presented strong argu- 
ments. Russell '18 ami Lipshires 
'1H also did very good work. In the 
rebuttals Russell was easily the star 
man with Draper second only to him. 
This debate closed a season intended 
to produce new varsity debate mate- 
rial. The results were that one new 
man of fine ability and one or pos* 
sibly two men of fair strength 
appeared. 

.11 NIOK-SKMOK DEBATE. 

The Senior class debating team de- 
feated the Junior team Thursday 
evening in the first round of inter- 
class debate to decide which team 
should meet the Freshmen in the final 
contest for the silver cup prizes. 

The question discussed was, "Re- 
b< >lved, that the Commission Form 
of City Government should be adopt- 
ed by American cities." Irvin B. 
Lincoln, Karl 8. Draper, and George 
K Hyde supported the affairmative 
side for the Seniors, while Thomas 
L. Harrocks, George N. Danforth 
A. J. Hicks upheld the negative. 
M any good points were brought up 
by both teams, but the Seniors had 
the better of the argument, and the 
votes of three judges were unanimous 
in their favor. 



The Juuior From committee has 
announced definitely that the From 
will be held Feb. 12. The committee 
meets twice each week, and a novel 
decorating scheme has been evolved. 
Several designs for dance orders are 
under consideration, but as yet none 
have been adopted. 



"HER HUSBAND'S WIFE" FOR 
ROISTER DOISTER PLAY 

Christmas Vacation Production a Pop- 
ular Modern Play. Trip to 
New York. 

"A comedy wholesome and hearty 
could not be improved upon," so says 
the New York evening Telegram in 
criticism of "Her Husband's Wife" 
the first production of the Roister 
Doisters this season. Few plays in 
recent years have aroused so much 
interest or won as great popularity 
as this rich sparkling comedy by A. 
E. Thomas. The story of "Her 
Husband's Wife" is distinctly novel, 
entertaining and satisfying. A 
young wife of hypochondriacal habit, 
that is to say, constantly taking 
"remedies" for imaginary ills, be- 
lieved she was going to die so decided 
to pick out her husband's second 
wife. The plainest, "dowdiest" 
person she could find was a spinster 
very severe of aspect. She gained 
the spinster's consent to be the suc- 
cessor. When however the old maid 
learned the reason for her selection 
she became very indignant ; aud 
began to "fix up," aud make herself 
attractive. The husband became 
interested and the wife regretting her 
bargain began to take steps to undo 
what she bad dons The means she 
adopted may have been "justified by 
the ends," for she told the "suc- 
cessor" all the bad that she could 
about the husband, calling him a 
brute, a wife beater and so on 
through a long list The old maid 
carried these stories to the husband, 
a loving, considerate man who was 
very much upset. In the end the 
wife decided she was not going to 
die and things were finally brought 
to a happy close. 

This play was produced originally 
by Klaw & Krlanger and staged 
under the personal direction of Henry 
Miller. It was first presented by a 
notable cast including Henry Miller, 
Robert Warwick, Laura Hope Crewi 
and other noticeable actors. It is 
one of the most important plays ever 
secured for presentation by an 
amateur society. 

The cut consists of i 



WILLIAMS AND RENSSELAER CONCERTS TO BE GIVEN IN 
FIRST GAMES ON SCHEDULE ; WALTHAM AND SOMFJWILLE 



Dartmouth and Princeton Games in 

Boston Arena During 

Vacation. 

On Friday afternoon, Dec. 1*, the 
M. A. C. hockey team meets Wil- 
liams at Williamstown in what prom- 
ises to be one of the best games of 
the year. Last M. A. C< defeated 
Williams 8-1, the year before 1 can- 
cellation was necessary due to poor 
ice, and in l'.H_'. a lie was the result 
of a hard-fought contest. Williams 
expects to be represented this year 
by the best hookey team she has ever 
had, and the game will be far from 
being the practice game for the Mas- 
sachusetts delegation that last year's 
game proved to be. The following 
day, the team plays R. F. I. in Troy. 
Rensselaer was defeated in 1912, but 
for the past two years cancellations 
were made by the Troy team. The 
team baa a weeks' vacation before 
meeting in Boston on Dec 28 for 
four days of bard practice before the 
Dartmouth game. 

The Boston Arena games afford 
every loyal Aggie alumnus a chance 
to see our hockey team in action. 
The Durtmouth game, coming ou Dec. 
31— on a Thursday night — is bound 
to be a strong game as the Hanover 
college has a well-rounded team and 
should make a good match for the 
M. A. C. aggiegation. 




John Balden. 




Clark MS 


Richard Belden, 




SelUttaff 16 


Stuart Randolph, 




Buckman '17 


Mr*. Stuart Randolph, 




Andrew* *i§ 


Emily I.adew, 




Wilbyr'17 


Mora, 




Patterson * 1 5 


The parts have 


been 


particularly 


[Continuad 


on pagi 


ijl 



HOCKEY NOTICE 



Christmas Vacation Hockey Games 
at Boston Arena. 



DEC. 31-8-15 P. M. Massachu- 
setts vs. Dartmouth. 

JAN. 4 —8*15 P. M . Massachu 
setts vs. Princeton. 



The P r i n cet on game will be the 
big "reunion" game. The greater 
part of the student body will be there 
with a large cheering section. We 
want every alumnus within at least a 
50-mile radius of Boston to attend 
and make it -M. A. 0. night" in the 
Arena, The Arena is located on 8t. 
Botolph street near Massachusetts 
avenue. 



Musical Cluiii- to Entertain for First 

Time in Vicinity of 

Boston. 

For the first time in the history of 
the Musical clubs, a trip is to be 
made in the vicinity of Boston during 
the Christmas recess. Manager 

Anderson has Arranged dates in 
Waltham, Somervitle and Bingham, 
all under the auspices of the chilis. 
By far the most important engage- 
ment is at Waltham on Die. 28, when 

the combination of dubs will appear 

at NuttingH-on-ihc-( hailcs, in a hall 
having seating accommodations for 
1000 people. The entertainment i> 

strictly informal with a concert from 
8 to 1-80 followed In dancing until 
11-30. The large hall with its taste- 
ful decorations and generous capacity 
is ideal for dancing and with the col- 

lege OflMBMaaHaaHaaflLaMLaMlif 

a goo 
ticket 

obtained HI We door- Waltham is 
easily accessible to those living near 
Boston, and may be reached most 
easily by taking the subway to Ha i- 
vard Square, thence to Watertown 
Square where a car may be taken 
direct to Waltham. The entire trip 
takes 45 minutes. 

Tuesday night, the L".Hh. the dubs 
will appear in Hingham at Loring 
Hall. Dancing will follow the ent< i- 
taiumcnt as at Waltham. Trains run 
hourly to Hingham from the South 
Station and there is a return train at 
11-30, It is hoped that all Aggie 
men living near Boston on the South 
Shore will avail themselves of the 
opportunity to hear the concert. 

At Sumerville theater in Davis 
Square, two double quartets will ap- 
pear in a special act on Dec. 31, 
Jan. 1 and '2, afternoon and evening. 

The importance of the se tripe for 
the welfare of the college cannot he 
overestimated for a huge percentage 
of M. A.C men none from Hie east 

em part of the slate. Hence, by 
showing that there is a Musical dub 
here worthy of repute. Aggie's popu. 
larity will be further increased. 

This year the Qlee club of 20 men 
is at its best under the excellent 
direction of John Bland, who d e se r v es 
much credit. The Mandolin dob 
under Farrar's direction bun been 
rounded into shape, and promises to 
be a grand success. The college 
I orchestra which has played so well at 




The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 15, 19 [4. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 15, 1914. 



ii 



the inforraais will furnish music for 
dancing. 

The presence of the alumni at the 
concerts is most earnestly solicited 
and along this line, Manager Ander- 
son said in part: "The support of 
alumni will help to make our first 
Kastern trip a success and I don't 
doubt but they will show they are 
behind us. It is my wish that each 
illiniums bring a prospective Aggie 
freshman to the concerts to give him 
an opportunity to see what we are 
doing at MA. C. Not only will 
the alninnus have a good time but the 
(■wiring will be spent "Boosting old 
Aggie" through the Musical clubs." 



ASSEMBLY 

Professor William Machmer of the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College 
faculty was the Bpeaker at the As- 
sembly exercises on Wednesday. 
He chose for his topic "Elements of 
Strength," the substance of his talk 
being as follows: "We all admire 
strength. We crave it for ourselves 
and for our institutions. The hope 
of becoming great arrouses in us the 
greatest efforts ami gives us the 
keenest satisfaction. In modem 
days, as in ancient (Jreece. the Oracle 
comes true after man has previously 
bowed before the Shrine ; mau must 
work to become great morally, in- 
tellectually, or physically. 

•'Whenever we speak of strength, 

^jj^of^t in its 

fW« wunhl have 

tf<q|& $a Strongest 



pathy. There is no one better quali- 
fied than you to solve the rural prob- 
lems *, it is your duty to help solve 
them ! What do you contemplate to 
do for the benefit of your community ? 

"The second element of strength 
is the ability to sympathize. We 
neglect to look at the question like 
the other fellow. The rural com- 
munities are behind the time ; they 
need your help. A rural teacher 
must sympathize with human life. 
We will be teachers whether we wish 
it or not. 

"The last element of strength is 
the possession of a high ideal of ser- 
vice. Find your relation to life and 
help make life easier. My message 
to you is to get a grip upon yourself 
and upon the reality of life ; then go 
in as a strong man whose whole life 
is dominated for a more manly man, 
womanly woman, and worldly world !" 



1917— S. F. Chamberlain, E. P. 
Cotton, C. II Hallet, E. Henderson, 
E. Hitter, G. W. Higgins, W. T. 
Livermore and W. Saville. 

PJ18— R. T. Clapp, F. K. Baker, 
D. B. Farrar, R. W. Weeks, h. M. 
Van Alstyne, L. II. Tucker, McC. 
H. Lieper and A. N. McClellan. 

Others who attended were ; God- 
win, Davidson, Aloe and Byran. 




'pmHWF^hrtv. »h*» rtfonptat college, 
the strongest football team, profes- 
sor, mechanic or workers. Now 
very few of us ever care or ever hope 
to rise to this superlative position. 
We are average folk looking forward 
to the time when we may be doing 
a strong and effective work princi- 
pally with the so-called great middle 
and lower classes. What then are 
some of the more potent elements of 
strength which make one more effi- 
cient in life's relationships? In gen- 
eral there are those factors which 
make for a well developed and well- 
preserved body, a well-trained mind 
and a good character. 

"The first element of strength to 
which I woidd call your attention is 
confidence and the ability to estab- 
lish this confidence in others. He is 
proverbially weak who lacks confi- 
dence in himself, and it is apparent 
that one so lacking fails utterly in 
any attempt to establish confidence 
in others. The 1 uralites are as a rule 
ready to learn. However, \<>n mast 
thorn them that the modern methods 
are Improvements over the old. There 
is a feeling among them that they 
aw missing something ; It 11 up to 
yon to supply this fot them. Stu- 
dents lack confidence in themselves 
and in their teachers ; the business 
man lacks confidence in the chemist ; 
the farmer in the agricultural ex- 
pert. The reason for this is lack of 
specific knowledge and lack of sym- 



INFORMAL 

Another successful informal, the 
largest oue of the season, was held 
iu the Drill hall on Saturday after- 
noon and evening. This was the 
third informal of the year, and 
although there was only a slight 
increase of several couples over the 
last informal, the dance was enjoyed 
by all present. 

The hall was decorated as on other 
similar occasions, the artistic temper- 
ament of the informal committee 
U-iug taxed to the limit by a lack of 
material. The orchestra, which was 
situated in the center, was banked 
on all sides by a row of palm plants. 
Directly above this, loug strips of 
maroon bunting hung perpendicularly 
from the center of the ceiling, and 
radiated to all parts of the hall. A 
large American Mag draped the north- 
eastern wall, and a smaller stars and 
stripes curtained the opposite corner. 
The banners and pennants which 
decked the walls were very conspicu- 
ous, and together with the customary 
electric-lighted M at the south end, 
and a large palm which screened tin- 
west entrance, the usual bare appear- 
ance of the hall was skillfully con- 
cealed. 

The patronesses were : Mrs. Park- 
er of Northampton, Miss Schafner 
of Mt. Holyoke college, Mrs. Billings 
of Smith college and Mrs. Hasbrouck 
and Mrs. Osmund of M. A. C. Those 
who attended were : 

19i;,_K. C. Towne, D. J. Lewis, 
W. II. Hatfield, M. J. dough, P. 
Hildreth, R. E. Tower, G. K. Perry. 
W. II. Sears, I. B. Lincoln, S. W. 
Banister, E. S. Wright, C.A. Bishop, 
V. L. Severance, F. W. Marsh, F. 
W. Buell, and A. Johnson. 

1016— C. A. Huntington, E. .1. 
Cardarelli, F. A. Anderson. H. W. 
Biihop, G. N. Dsnforlh, T. Dillon, 

C. H. Fernald, G. B. Fisher, C. E. 
Hathaway, K. B. Laird, C. W. 
Moses, J. T. Nicholson, G. B. Pal- 
mer, T. S. Rogers, B. C. Sander, S. 

D. Sherinyan, H. T. Whitey, C. F. 
Goodwin and E. C. Selkregg. 



TRACK TEAM PROSPECTS 

Although prospects for the coming 
indoor track Beason at M. A. C. are 
not unusually bright just at present, 
there is every reason to believe that 
with some of last year's squad to 
build on, Coach Dickinson will be 
able to round out a team which is a 
credit to the college. The loss of 
Smith, Baer and Favor will be keenly 
felt this year and there should be a 
lively competition for the places left 
by these men. Besides Mostrom 
and Hussell MO and Sturtevant and 
Pratt '17, who ran in some of the 
meets last year, several good men 
from the freshman class are expected 
to try out for the team. This year, 
as in other years, the cry has been 
that there is a wealth of track mater- 
ial around college if the men only 
had enough ambition to come out. 
Every man who has, or thinks he has 
any running ability should try for 
the team, thus giving Coach Dickin- 
son a larger number to choose from 
and a better opportunity to develop 
some good relay men. 

Practise will start immediately 
after the Christmas vacation, when 
the candidates will have their first 
light workout. The board running 
track has been repaired and put into 
first class shape so that there need no 
longer be any complaint about im- 
proper facilities. Manager Clark 
has announced a tentative schedule 
of meets for the coming season. 
Freshmen will be eligible to compete 
in all but that of Jau. t8. The 
schedule is as follows : 
Jan. 23. Coast Artillery Meet at 
Boston, Tufts vs. M. A. C. 
Jan 29, Pending. 
Feb. I, B. A. A. Meet,M. A.C.vs. 

Worcester Tech. 
Feb. l.'L Iuterclass Track Meet. 
Feb. 1!*, Armory Meet at Hartford, 
Conn. Brown vs. M. A. C. 
Feb. 20, Rhode Island State at Prov- 
idence. 
Those who have seen Coach Dick- 
inson turn out winning teams in past 
years under adverse circumstances 
have little doubt of his ability to 
to repeat the trick again this year. 
In order to do It, however, he must 
have the co-operation of every man 
who is interested in the development 
of track at a 'varsity sport here at 
Massachusetts, and li wilting to sac- 
rifice a little time for the good of the 
team. 



THE FENCING CLUB 

A new club was born at Aggie last 
Wednesday afternoon to swell her 
goodly family. Mr. Gore, attending, 
reports that it is doing well. 
Through the careful and timely work 
of Captain Martin and Professor 
Nelligan fencing haB been introduced 
in the college. For several years 
Professor Nelligan has desired to 
establish a fencing club in the local- 
ity but has been unable to find a 
competent instructor until Professor 
Andraud located iu Springfield. As 
soon as he found a good instructor 
he established a small club at Am- 
herst and then took steps to introduce 
the sport here. Captain Martin, also 
interested, gave over the Wednesday 
drill period to an exhibition that was 
followed by a call for men who cared 
to form a club here, Fifty-two men 
responded, thus assuring a good clnb. 
In the instructor that has been 
secured the college is fortunate. 
Professor Andraud has trained the 
championship teams of Cornell for 
three years. He also turned out 
material for the Olympic games at 
Stockholm that was a credit to the 
country This fact clearly proves 
his ability as a teacher, in addition 
to his own skill with the foils. The 
formation of such a large club is also 
very fortunate for it brings the sport 
within the reach of every man in col- 
lege who shows the least interest, a 
tax of two dollars a month being 
sufficient to cover the expenses of the 
club. This is merely 25 cents per 
lesson while it is very common for an 
instructor of the same caliber as Pro- 
fessor Andraud to receive from 
13.00 to 15.00 per lesson. 

Additional interest to the three 
under classes comes from the fact 
that the work may be substituted for 
the regular weekly "gym" credit 
during the winter. 

Thanks are not due to Professor 
Nelligan alone but Captain Martin 
also comes in for a share. He made 
it possible for an exhibition before 
the major portion of the student 
body so that the matter was well 
introduced. He has further shown 
his interest by offering to furnish at 
least a part of the supplies necessary 
to install the clnb. 

Classes will begin directly after 
the Christmas vacation. 



THE ROISTER DUiSTERS 

f Continued from page i] 



'H.— Alfred L. Tower, address 
Contoocook, N. H., is teacher of 
science and agriculture at Hopkintcn 
Ugh school. 



SOCIALIST C0HVEHTI0N 

The sixth annual convention of 
the Intercollegiate Socialist society 
will be held in New York City, Dec. 
29, 80 and 81. The convention din- 
ner, held on Dec 80, will discuss the 
subject "How can permanent Peace 
be assured F' Among the speaker 
are Hamilton Holt, editor of tte 
Indq««i<»#, Charlotte Perkins GH1- 
msn, Morris Hillquit, Prof. EUen 
Hayes and Florence Kelley. The 
other sessions will be addressed by 
well known authorities on socialism 
and social reform. 



well executed at the rehearsals during 
the fall. One difficulty that the 
manager has faced this year has 
been the scheduling of dates. With- 
out exception where ever last year's 
cast played Shakespeare near New 
York dates for this year have been 
refused. In a way this has proved 
fortunate for in other places a better 
class of theaters has been secured. 
The dates, with the exception of the 
first, are in large towns. 

Itinerary : 
Dec. 16, Montague. 

28, Dates pending at W ailing- 

ford. Conn, and New llo- 
ehelle, N. Y. 

29, Paterson, N. J. 

30, Far Rockaway, N. Y. 

31, Jamaica, NY 

Feb. 13, Prom Show, Amherst. 

On New Years night the cast will 
have a banquet at Little Hungary, 
New York. At this time it is ex- 
pected that a number of prospective 
freshmen will meet the cast. Ar- 
rangements have already been made 
with several. 

A special feature of this season's 
work is that no professional coaching 
has been done. This seems to be 
highly successful as it gives the indi- 
vidual men opportunity, and in fact 
forces them, to rely on their own 
interpretation of the part. Each 
member is entering into the work 
with much eagerness and putting 
forth his best. Andrews and Wilbur 
have shown up particularly well in 
ichearsal. It is safe to say that 
Andrews takes his part as a girl 
better than any man that ever en- 
tered the college. 

The gowns to lie worn were de- 
signed and executed by a Fifth Ave- 
nue costumer. 

The Roister Doisters are anxious 
to be seen by as many of the alumni 
as possible. In and around Boston, 
M. A. C. men are going to support 
the musical clubs and the hockey 
team. The men from near New 
York should also do their share and 
a hearty support of the dramatic 
society wonld be appreciated. 

SUNDAY CHAPEL 

The address in Sunday chapel was 
delivered by Rev. Wm. I. Chamber- 
lain of the Reformed Church of New 
York, He proved to be a most <l< >• 
■ 1 uen t, forceful, and magnetic speaker, 
choosing for his subject "Love and 
Personality" with the text "I girded 
thee though thou hast not known 
me." In his sermon he emphasized 
the following points 1 

"In speaking about love, one of 
the first questions that naturally arise 
is, what is love ? This may proba- 
bly be best Illustrated by Helen 
Keller, Deaf, dumb and blind, she 
was brought from darkness to light 
by her most faithful and remarkable 
teacher, Miss Sullivan, who showed 
her what real love is. This love, 



however, great as it was, could not 
be compared to Helen Keller's per- 
sonality. This word personality has 
a rather vague meaning and we often 
use it rather promiscuously. How- 
ever, its best definition seems to be 
that it is that quality in a man which 
is striking and self-revealing, mani- 
festing itself clearly in the man's 
bearing. You come in contact with 
hundreds of people daily whom you 
scarcely give a second thought to, but 
soon you meet one who holds your 
attention. You watch him closely, 
and even seem to be attracted to him . 
Why, you ask? It is because that 
person has a personalty. There are 
certain men, magnetic in their man- 
ner, who seem to be thoroughly en- 
dowed with the spirit of leadership 
and make the task of following them 
a real joy, Abraham Lincoln, the 
greatest leader of this country, had 
a most remarkable personality. Peo- 
ple were drawn to him as through a 
magnet, and hushed into a deep 
reverence. This then is personality. 
If personality is of such impor- 
tance, what then is our duty toward 
it! It is simply to invest, develop, 
and expand this quality in our own 
lives to a still higher degree. This 
can best be done by fellowship, 
shown in some service. We are all 
endowed with some of God's gifts 
and it is our duty to use all that we 
possess to the best possible advan- 
tage. There is now a great person- 
ality in the world which has domina- 
ted history for centuries and which 
can never be removed. It is the 
personality of Qbrist which has be- 
come so infused into the minds of 
men as to make it of the most vital 
importance today. Fa eh teacher, 
each follower of Christ hands down 
characteristics that can never be de- 
stroyed. Thus we see that Christ 
has girded us even though we may 
not realize it. 



FRESHMAN BASEBALL 
SCHEDULE- 

Assistant baseball manager Spani- 
eling has arranged a good schedule 
of games for the 1918 team to play 
next spring. It is at follows : 
April 17. Deerfield Academy at 
Deerfield. 
19. Amherst High at Blake 

Field. 
M . Amherst High on Campus. 
May 1. Williston Seminary at 
Easthampton. 
rt. Conn. Literary Institute 

at Sufileld, Conn. 
I. r >. Williams Freshmen at 

Williamstown. 
It. Monson Academy at 

Monson. 
W, Cushing Academy at 

A shim nihil m. 
.".I. Wllbraham Academy at 
Wilbraham. 



'10. — Edward F. Dimon has re- 
centlv been elected secretarv and ' 
manager of the Villa Park Orchards ' 
Association. Address, Orange. Cal. 



OR. R. C. 

Dentist 

NASH'S BLOCK 

Evenings by Appointment. 



I.MiK'OVII/. 

Tailor ant> Prksskk. 

dents' Furnishings- Dress Suits to 

Rent— Drill Gloves and Collars 

Ticket Svstfm. 

11 .Xi •»•«>■..«-.! . I'le.n,. 



Are You a Spug ? 

That Is a Member of the Society for Promo- 
tion of Useful Giving. 



^^•.•.■.■.•.■.•.•.•.•.•.•.^•.■.•.-.•.•.•.•.•.^•.•.■.•.^^^■.■.•.•.•.■.•.•.•.•.•.^•.•.•,yyyy» 

There is certainly nothing more useful than clothing, and nothing 
more personal or that would be more appreciated. 

We are well supplied with a stock of seasonable merchandise that 
cannot fail to win your approval. 

Incidentally we are never undersold. 

Let us help you with your Christmas buying. 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



! 

Twenty-five cents will be put in a box for the 
NEW ATHLETIC FIELD every time you 
buy shoes at our store costing $3.50 or over. 

VERY LATEST STYLES. 

Shoes for the Drill- $2.50 to $5.00 



F*afee f si Shoo Store 

School and College Pftotographcrs ♦ . . 




LOO ALLY: 5* Center St., Northampton, Mass., 

and South Hadley. Mass. 



Main Office; 

1 546-1 548 Broadway, 

New York City 



These Studios offer the best skilled 
artists and most complete 

equipment obtainable 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



•DEALERS IS- 



Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 



' 



V 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 15, 1914- 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

BOARD OF EDITORS 
FRANK W. BUELL *i5, Editor-in-Chief 

TYLER S. ROr,KRS*i6, Managing Editor 
HF.NRY IL WHITE '15, Asiistant Editor 
,AMBS A- PRICEM5. Athletic Editor 

E. SUMNER DRAPER'is. Athletic Editor 
THOS.L. HAR ROCKS '16, Department Editor 
ALFRED A. GIOlOSA'lo, Campus Editor 
FRANK I. SCIIEl'FEI.E. Alumni Editor 

Mll-FORD R. LAWRENCE '17, 

Associate Editor 
RICHARD W. SMITH '17, Associate Editor 



must be variety bo it should be ex- 
pected that occasionally new hymns 
will be played. All of these sugges- 
tions are made in the hope of improv- 
ing chapel exercises and have not 
been written in the manner of des- 
tructive criticism. 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

MAURICE J. CLOUGH '15. Rusiness Manager 
CHAS A. HUNTINGTON. IK. '16. 

Assistant Business Manager 
W. RICHARDSEARSM5 Advertising ManV 
LESTER E. FIELDING '16. Ass't Adv. Mgr. 
BIRGEK R. ROSEQUIST'17. Circulation 



Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies, s cents. Make all orders payable 
to Maurice J. Ci.ouoh. 



Entered as eeeond-cton matter at the Amherw 
Port Off tee. 



Vol. XXV. Tuesday. Dfx. 15. No. 12 



Comment has come from all Bides 
as to the appearance and conduct of 
the onlookers at the Informal on Sat- 
urday. Viewed from the floor there 
seemed to be a preponderance of drill 
or flannel shirts that had long been 
alien to the laundry surrounded by 
sweaters, sweat shirts and jerseys. 
More noticeable was the crowding out 
of the gallery frequenters as the in- 
termission was reached, filling up the 
narrow stairway and causing the girls 
to give way and wait a chance to 
ascend the stairway. It is a fact that 
Informal! are not run for a few and 
that they are in reality public affairs 
butat.the same time some considera- 
tion should be given to those who do 
go. and care should be taken by the 
others as to the exact meaning of the 
word informal when applied to dress 
and conduct. 



Chavei. singing has had itsups and 
downs during the last few years and 
at present does not seem to be at an 
unusually high pinnacle. This is a 
factor that is of considerable import- 
ance in the chapel program and 
deserves attention. Co-operation is 
needed here, as is always the case in 
bringing about improvements along 
such a line, and the help of each man 
attending chapel is a necessity. We 
cannot all sing well else the (ilee club 
would have our services but most of 
us can carry the tune and can help in 
improving the tone and volume of the 
melody by each doing hi* share. It 
it difficult to select a moment when 
the whole assemblage will arUe at the 
beginning of a hymn. At present an 
arbitrary time la now uaed, would it 
not be easier to have the organist play 
the hymn entirely through and then 
rise? The prevent location of the 
choir U an improvement over their 
former location, but if they were 
placed in the front of the gallery their 
aioglng could b* heard to better 
advantage. Well known hymns are 
easier to ling than new ones but there 



The approaching Christmas holi- 
days promise to be full of activity for 
all the organizations of the college 
that perform during the winter 
months. For the benefit of those that 
are always interested in the welfare 
of the college and are in favor of the 
policy, "It pays to advertise," an 
enumeration of the schedules of the 
various activities will not be out of 
place. 

The Musical clubs are making a trip 
to Boston and vicinity— their first 
to that city. Waltham, Somerville 
and Uingham will each be favored 
with a performance and it is expected 
that a more elaborate trip may be 
arranged for next year as a result of 
the showing made on this trip. The 
Uoister Doisters, with their up-to-date 
play, "Her Husband's Wife," will 
make their third annual trip through 
New York state and New Jersey and, 
although some difficulty was encoun- 
tered in securing dates, an average 
itinerary has been arranged. Ath- 
letics will receive more prominence 
than ever before in the scheduling of 
two big hockey games in Boston at 
the Arena. Dartmouth will be met 
there on the first of January and 
Princeton, last year's champions, will 
be played on the fourth. 

All of these trips represent consid- 
erable work on the part of the under- 
graduates aud allow the alumni a 
. Ii:mce to show their interest in the 
work that the men are doing and at 
the same time aid the college by giv- 
ing their support both financially, but 
of greater importance, by their 
presence. 



REXALL Baby Cough Syrup 



For a young cough. 



REXALL Cherry Bark Comp. 

For your cough. 

Each 25 cents a bottle 



HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The REXALL Store on the Corner 



CJNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

km.ihi: SUNDAY BKRVICB AT 7 PM. 



E. RUSSELL NORTON 



SALES AGF.NT 



Davenport Miller 
Vein Coal 

Best Quality Pennsylvania Coal 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 

MODERN REPAIR DERT. 

E.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOFMAN 



E. E. MILLETT 

JEWELER and OPTOMETRIST 

Lenses ground while you wait 

Collbgb Jewelry 

Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and Guitar Strings 

AMHERST, MASS. 
Next to Post Office. 



Amherst 



BOSTON OFFICE NEW YORK OFFICE 

85 Water St. 1 Broadway 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

[Notices for this column should be dropped in 
the Collegian Office or handed to Alfied A. 
' .miosa *i6, on or before the Saturday preceding 
each issue. 1 

Dfxembek if). 

1-10 P. M.— Assembly, Mr. Jewell B. 
Knight, M. A. C, 1892, Bel 
chertown. 

Dec km her 17. 
6-45 P. M.— M. A. C. C. A. in chapel. 
7 30 V. M— (ilee club rehearsal in chapel. 

Dkcemhkk 18. 
600 P. m.— Chritsmas recess begin*. 

Hockey— Williams at Wil- 
liamstown. 

December 19. 
Hockey— Renwelaer at Troy, 
N. Y. 

Hockey — Dartmouth at Bo» 
ton Arena. 

January 4. 
Hockey— Princeton at Hoston 
Arena, 

January 5, 
7 40 a. M.— Winter recess ends. Chapel. 

January 6. 
Hockey— Yale at New Haven 
Arena, 
5 00 v. M. — Freshman class ting in 
chapel. 



ftMHERST BOOK STORE 

CURRAN * DYER* Prop*. 

Loose- Leaf Note Books and Fountain 
—Peat— 



CO - OP LAUNDRY 

High-Grade College Work 



Shirts, 
Collars, • 
Cuffs, - 

Plain wash, 
Same, rough dry, 



1015c 

S I-tC 
s I-1C 

48c per doz. 
<■ joe per doz, 

DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning aud Pressing, fi.50 a Suit 

R. T. Fnorr.Afent ; D. Smmiwyan, Asst. Agent 
Try oar ticket system 

Put full name and R ddrSS S on laundry 



-Come to us for 



Fireplace Goods, Coat and Trooser Hangers 



Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 



iensils 



Always glad to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 15, 1914. 



5 



The Holyoke Valve £ Hydrant Co. 

Jobbers of Wrought Iron and Brass Pipe, Valves 
and Fittings for Steam, Water and Gas, Asbestos 
and Magnesia Boiler and Pipe Coverings, Pipe 
Cut to Sketch. Mill Supplies. Engineers and 
Contractors for Steam and Hot Water Heating, 
Automatic Sprinkler Systems, Boiler and Engine 
Connections. - - Holyoke, Mm. 



Heaerved ft»r 



BECKMAN 



7-00 P. M — Stockbridge club in South 

College. 
7 30 P. M.— Glee club rehearsal in 

chapel. 
7-30 p.m.— Bible class at Dr. Chamber. 

Iain's. 
, GLEE CLUB TRIP. 

Dec. 28— Waltham, Nutting Von- ihe- 
Charles. 

Dec. 29 — Loring Hall, Hingham. 

Dec. 3 1 -J an. 1 and 2— Somerville Thea- 
ter, Davis Square, Somerville. 



Kiiiiip 



»• 



LOW PRICE TAILORING CO, 

SUITS MADE TO ORDER 
Suits Cleaned. Pressed and Dyed. Alt kinds of 
Kepairing for Ladies and Gentlemen neatly done. 
High-grade work by first-class tailor. Work 
called tor and delivered. Sell tickets for pressing, 
4 suits for $1 50 

GEORGE KOTOWITZ, Prop 

Main Street, Amherst Mast. Nash Block 

On your way to the Post Office. Tel. 438 W 



FLEMING'S SHOE STORE 

Northampton 



COLLEGIAN COMPETITION 

The standing of tin- competitors 
for the editorial board of the Colle- 
gian is as follows : 

1916. 
Karnes. If, J 

O'Brien, 18.6 

P.H7. 



Savillc. 
Bonn, 

Henderson, 
Dizer, 



For particular people 

THE ELMS RESTAURANT 



213 Main St., Northampton 

(Near Amherst car lino 

t Quality Restaurant at Moderate 
Prices. 

TRY OUR SPECIALS 

And a la carte service. 

OYSTERS STEAKS CHOPS 
FRIED CHICKEN, ETC. 

Open 6 a. m. to 1 1 p. m. 



Rogers, 

1*18. 

•Jones, 

Willoiighhy. 

IngnlU, 

.1 wii - A. I'm* k. 

Competition Fxlitor. 



2;i.:{ 

20.1 

18.8 

9.2 

8.0 



13.3 



FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

< iro wn by the Floriculture! Dcpt, 

We offer our surplus stock of cut 
flowers and plants at reasonable rates 
to students and faculty. This stock 
U grown in modern houses under 
•deal conditions. Roses, carnations, 
violets, chrysanthemums and sweet 
P«as in season. 



•»• ■ i- 



QROWN ON THE CAMPUS 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Everything in Photography 

Including Framing. 

<iood work sprain lor Itself. 

Nish Block, Amherst, Maw. 



COUNTRY LIFE CLUB 

"Rural Improvement** was the sub- 
ject of a talk given at the Country 
Life Club Thursday evening, by Mr. 
Philip H. FJIwood of the Kvtension 
Service. After describing the oppor- 
tunities which present themselves to 
tin- worker in rural uplift, lie told the 
club how a reformation movement 
might be started. F.mphasis was 
laid on the necessity for practical 
work at opposed to theory : The 
would-be reformer who enters a vil- 
lage and proceeds to tell the people 
what they should do, is immediately 
regarded with distrust. But the man 
who gradually works himself into the 
confidence of the townspeople, is 
certain to be given great opportu- 
nities for nseful service. In con- 
cluding his talk, Mr. FJIwood sug- 
gested a number of topics for fur- 
their consideration by the club, and 
most of these will he taken up at 
future meetings ; rural recreation, 
outdoor dramatics, productive forest 
parks, street signs and lighting, tax- 
ation and housing conditions, legis- 
lation and town planning will each be 
considered in their tuin. The next 
meeting is scheduled for January 7. 

SUMMER SCHOOL REUNION 
There will be a reunion and ban- 
quet of the 1914 Bummer school stu- 
dents of Massachusetts Agricultural 
college at Rivet-bank Court, Cam- 
bridge, on Saturday evening, Jan. i. 
Banquet at 7 o'clock. Those regular 
students who were present but sum- 
mer and made college life so pleasant 
for the Summer school are cordially 
invited to be present. Tickets may 
be procured by notifying Misa Eleanor 
J. Homer, Secretary, 81 Hudson St., 
Somerville. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 

Mr. Campion has just returned from England with the 

AQUASCUTUM 

OVERCOATS 
Wells-Margetson Neckwear, Caps & Knitted Vests 

On account of war it will not be possible to j^ct any more of 
these goods, so an early inspection will be to your advantage. 




Fine Tailoring 



Men's Furnishings 



-See Our Agenti 



Hubbard's BasE Fertilizers 

the most economical you can use. 

_^ BESIR CROPS 



.^Kiiiim^. 



Ofc BA *a 

B ON L? ( 
asLV, 



■re the inevitable result. 



THE ROGERS * HUBBARD COMPANY, Middletown, Conn. 

Oft!..- hi., I Work-, I'., ill...,. I «...,.. 




'{jj J £J are supplied every year 

Durpee s deeds ^^^^^^^\- 

« can planters than are 

the seeds of any other growers. Do you know Burpee- 
Quality "Seeds that Grow" ? If not, we would like to 
make your acquaintance. Simply send us your address 
(a postal card will do) and you will receive Burpee's 
Annual for 1914, — a bright new book of 182 pages, which 
is recognized as **The Leading American Seed Catalog." 
Kindly write to-day! Address 




Burpee BaMafi, 




A. SHEPARD 



MEN'S STORE 



Use our new cash discount card 
and save five per cent on 

SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING 

Furnishings and Custom Tailoring 



C*rpfnier & Morehouse, 

PRINTER, 



No. 1, Cook Place, 



Amherst, M 







i 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 15, 1914- 



JORDAN MARSH COMPANY 

Boston 

TWO GREAT BUILDINGS— OVER 1 ,000,000 SQUAK K KEKT 
OF FLOOR SPACE— 169 SEPARATE SELLING SECTIONS. 

For Room Furnishings, Wearing Apparel, Unique and 
Practical Articles for Gifts- in fact each of the thousand 
and one things student life calls for- this store is the logi- 
cal shopping place for the college men of New England. 

Our Clothing and Furnishings Store is just a step from 
Summer Street. Do not fail to visit when you are in Boston. 
It is filled with just tin- kind of toggery young men like. 

All Purchases delivered FREE to Amherst. 
M,iil Orders given prompt attention. 



THE 

Hoover & Smith Go. 

616 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 
Diamond Merchants 

Philadelphia's Official Fraternity Jeweler 

SPECIALISTS IN 

Fraternity Badges, Fobs, Novelties, 

Rings, Charms Prizes Trophies. 

Medals College Pins, Fobs, Seals, 

Rings, Charms 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Now *t 13 Pleasant M. 
I Oculists 1 I'rescrn.tious Killed. Ilioken Lenses 

Accurately Replaced. Fie* Watch Repairing 
Promptly and .«kiltull> Door. 

Satisfaction Ciuar-.mteed 



Batchelder & Snyder Co. 

fAt'KKKS. POULTRY IIRr.SMCICK 
,\Nl> BOrTKH M4KCRti 

WH<>l-KS*I.F. DEALERS IN 

tteef Mutton. Lamb. Veal. Pork, Lard, Mams, 

Bacon, Sausages. Poultry, tiame, Butter 

Cheese. Eggs, Beans. 

Office & St >r«t (MS.U.fa. ' &/". BlAckstone St. 

Boston Kicking Mouse. Brighten, Mass. 

S ttln I'.ultrv Dressing Plant. Boston. 

Creameries in Vermont. 



"SCOTTIE" 
H. HOOPER 

Will t lean and press your clothes so you 

will be satisfied. It costs no more 

and he is nearer to "Aggie." 

HBRRAI TICKET S>STHM 

Under Columbia Cafe 



" BIDE-A- WEE " 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles 

11.11 >pi?ci;iltv— And other good things to eat. 

MKS. L. N\, STEBBINS, 

Middle Street, Hadley, Mass 

Tel. 41 $W 



E. B. DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 
Williams (Mock, Amherst. Mass. 

(ItlKf Motile: o to 12 A. M„ I to to 5 1'. M. 



Telephone so— h 



STEAM FITTING. 
OAS FITTING. I INNING 

F. W. DANCE & CO., Plumbers 

Specialty of Repairing 

CHURCH Windows, Memorial 

WlMiOWS, l.FAII l.M.HTS. &C. 

6CbftonAve. AMHKKST. MASS, 



THE TICWI'WY PAMLOR 

Clfllng IT.-hi.Iiik K«|»Mlrlni; 

ijuii k.«i H#rTlra-, B*-»t Wnrk. I^iw^M t»rlw 
All woik carefully done. Work called for and 
delivered. Gents* overcoats, salts. p»nts and 
coats. Ladies' fine hr»*n «nits a so»cialtv. 
Teams will call every day at M. AC 

WH. PKANKI.IN. Prop. 

Rear Nash Bl'k, Amherst Tel. No. W* 




Huntington Ave., Exeter and Blagden Sts., Boston, Mass. 

Headquarters for College Men when in the ciiy. 

AMOS H. WHIPPLE, PROP. 



ROISTER DOISTER CONCERT 

Tnemluv cvtMiing's entertainment, 
given in the Chapel under the nuspi- 
ctet of the Roister Doisters, was a 
grand success. The famous Swanee 
River Quartette from Alabama ex- 
celled all expectations and presented 
as good an entertainment as has been 
shown here. Mr. Gannt especially, 
in his great personification of Old 
Black Joe, was surely excellent. 

The fact that the chapel was nearly 
filled when the concert began is in- 
dicative of the interest and apprecia- 
tion of the student body for the pro- 
gressivenesH of the dramatic society. 
About fifty dollars was cleared, and 
it is earnestly ho|>ed that this strong 
support will always be forthcoming. 

STOCK JUDGING CUPS 

After the Wednesday Assembly 
1 Kennedy M'» presented the cups won 
at the Brockton Fair by the Stock 
.Judging Team. Before presenting 
the cii|« he spoke in support of the 
Stockbridge Clnb, outlining its pur- 
pose and the activities in which it has 
hranches. Kennedy urged all men 
interested in agriculture to join the 
club and thus receive the full bene- 
fit of its various lectures and talks. 
The Stockbridge Club supports the 
Stock Judging, the Apple Judging, 
and the Apple Packing Teams. The 
silver cup for first prize was awarded 
to Whitmore '15, Moberg and Har- 
vey, who tied for third place received 
similar trophies. 



BERKSHIRE COUNTY ALUMNI 

At a feed and get together of M. 
A. C. men in Berkshire County on 
Friday evening, Dec. 18, at the New 
American House, Pittsfield, a Berk- 
shire County Alumni Association will 
be organized. Mattoon '1(5 and 
Smith '17 among the students and 
Cook and O'Hearn captains of the 
'01 anil '04 football teams have 
taken an active part in the work. It 
is planned that the Association shall 
work with the men already in college 
to interest good Berkshire men in 
"Old .Aggie." The men pushing 
this scheme hope that thiB will be the 
first of similar organizations one in 
each county that shall co-operate in 
boosting the college. 

1917 ELECTIONS 
At a recent meeting of the class of 

TJI7, V. W. Mayo of Houston, Me. 

was elected business manager of the 

Tnde* % and Lewis J. Buckman of 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa., editor-in-chief. 

The other positions on the board will 

be filled by competition. 

W. R. Irving of Taunton was 

elected manager of class hockey at 

the same meeting. 



CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 



Now is the time to be planning for 

FraternityGroups 

——Have them taken at 

McCLELLAN'S STUDIO 

Northampton, Mm. 



IRK 



44 State Street, 



Arthur J. Orner, a missionary on 
furlough from Mt. Salinda, South 
Africa, spoke before the Christian 
Association last Friday evening. 
His talk, which was on the work of 
the agricultural and industrial mis- 
sions at Mt. Saliuda, was illustrated 
by some beautifully colored slides. 
The meeting was a very profitable 
one to all who attended. 



COMMUNICATION 

(Communications to the Collegian concern- 
ing matters of general interest are welcomed 
The Collegian is not to b* held responsible 
for the opinions thus expressed.) 

Editor of the Mass. Collkcman : 
Dear Sir; 
Judging by the numerous Inquiries 
received, we believe that a statement 
of the potash situation may be of 
interest to your readers. 

At the outbreak of the war the 
shipping season for potosh from Ger- 
many was at its height, but since 
then the shipments have been made 
only in limited quantities. The 
prospect, however, is that that they 
will increase as time goes on. Pot- 
ash is not contraband of war and 
none of the nations at war objects to 
its movement in neutral ships. There 
is, however, great difficulty in secur- 
ing railway and river equipment to 
move it from the mine* and store- 
nouses to the coast. 

The mines are in good condition 
awl enough workmen not subject to 
military service are available to keep 
them in operation. 

The interruption of traffic has not 
made American soils or crops am 
less hungry for Potash. 

Most of the leading fertilizer man- 
ufacturers have agreed to utilize 
present supplies of Potash in the 
effort to supply fertilizers with at 
least 2 or 3 per cent of Potash next 
spring and the supplies on band at 
the outbreak of the war were said to 
be sufficient for this purpose. There 
is therefore no reason why farmers 
should not secure some Potash in 
their goods, although the nsual 5 to 
10 per cent might not be obtained.. 
H. A, Hostor, 

German Kali Works 



'09.— Jared B, Thomson, farm 
manager, Monterey, 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 15, 1914. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

'07.— H P. Wood is taking a 
course of lectures on the transmission 
of disease by insects, in the School 
of Tropical Medicine, connected with 
Harvard University. He is on leave 
of absence from the D. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture until April 1. 
Until then his address is 11 Fern- 
wood Road, Boston. 

'09. — Charles White was appointed 
secretary of Worcester County Im- 
provement League on December first. 

'14. — Leone Ernest Smith was seen 
about the campus over Saturday and 
Sunday. "Boy's club work* best 
vet," he claims. Address Box 77, 
Colchester, Conn. 

'14. — Henry J. Wood is farm man- 
ager for A. C. Bunnage, Halifax 
Garden Co., Halifax. 

'14.— Alden H. Russell, Washing- 
ton, D. C, is working for the U. S. 
I). A. bureau of Animal Industry. 

'14.— Emory B. Hebard, herds- 
man, Silverwood farm, Holliston. 



Boston Alumni at Princeton Gamk. 

The hockey game with Princeton 
at the Arena on Monday, Jan. 4th, 
is to be made a feature by the alumni 
of Boston. At the feed last Friday 
night it was decided that the alumni 
should get together for a dinner on 
that uight, at the Cafe Minerva (on 
Huntington Ave. near Massachusetts 
Ave.), at 6-30 o'clock. 

This is to be LadieB' night, bring 
the ladies and attend the game in a 
body afterwards. The entire stu- 
dent body will also be at the game, 
the college opening having been 
postponed for a day to allow this. 

Local alumni are requested to 
notify the secretary, P. W. Piokard, 
43 Chatham St , Boston, if they plan 
to be with us at this feed. 



J. GIIV8BU 

11 i-a Amity Street 

Modern Shoe Repairing 

ANNOUNCING 

75c Special Half Sole, Rubber 75 c 

REPAIRING 

Black. Tan, White Work Guaranteed. 

PRICES 

• l.fto 

• 1.7A 

u.oo 



Rubber Soles 

Kubber Soles, with Heels 

Soles Sewed, . 

St Shines for 



hold Ularren 

South Deerfield, Mass. 

T. J. AHERN. manager 



SEE and TRY 

61 LAVAL 

We cannot believe that there is a 
sensible man living who would pur- 
chase any other than a DE LAVAL 
Cream Separator for his own use if 
he would but SEE and TRY an im- 
proved DE LAVAL machine before 
buying, 
ft is a fact that 99% of all separator 
buyers who do SEE 
and TRY a D E 
LAVAL machine 
before buying, pur- 
chase the 1)1. 
LAVAL, and will 
have no other sepa- 
rator. The 1% who 
do not buy the DE 
LAVAL are those 
who allow them- 
selves to be influ- 
enced by something other than real 
genuine separator merit. 

Every responsible person who 
wishes it may have the Free Trial of 
* DE LAVAL machine at his own 
home without advance payment or 
any obligation whatsoever. Simply 
ask the DE LAVAL agent in your 
nearest town or write direct to the 
nearest DE LAVAL office. 

THE DElMIll SEPARATOR CO. 




h s Broadway 



*9 E. Madison St. 
Chicago 



Boston Alumni Gkt-to<;ktiikk. 
Aggie alumni of Boston and vicin- 
ity held the first of series of informal 
winter meetings at the American 
House, Boston, last Friday night. 
About fortv local bovs were present 
and after dinner talked freely on sub- 
jects ranging from the Athletic licl.l 
to the Kuropeau war. 

Professor Mackimmie of the col- 
lege, was guest and speaker of the 
evening and was warmly welcomed by 
the men present. Others who talked 
briefly were : W. II. Bowker '71 , Mal- 
ison Bunker *7;">, K. B. Macintosh *86, 
J.N. Summers '07, S. S. Crossinan 
'09, and Leon K. Smith' 14. 

Besides Professor Mackimmie 
those present were: W. II Bowker 
'71, M. Bunker '75, H. K. WaJdroo 
*79, E. B. Mackintosh '86, F. W. 
Davis '89, Lowell Manley "M, L. F. 
Harvey 'Otf, J. N. Summers, C. 11. 
Chadwick '07, Clifford Dolan. U. E. 
Cutting '08, H. L. White. R. S. 
Grossman 'ny, S. W. Meiidum, K. S. 
Eddy '10, H. A. I'auly, l\ w. Piok- 
ard Ml, J. M. Heald, A. F. Midler 
*12, Harold Lyon, II. W. Curtis, F. 
W. Whitney '13, II. D. Brown, L. (,. 
Davies, J. (i. Hutchinson, Harry 
Nissen, Leon K. Smith. I\ O. Peter- 
son, R. A. Payne, K. C. Edwards, 
H. W, Karle, Delmont Caldwell, L. 
O. Anderson, D. W. Jones, K. L. 
Ha /en *I4. 

There are three or four of these 
informal gatherings planned for the 
winter- — those who came Friday are 
all coming again and others who were 
in >t able to attend are urged to see 
to it that they get there the nest 
time. 



At a recent meeting the women of 
the taculty voted to take an active 
part in the work of the Belgian 
charity commission. A committee 
was appointed to solicit clothes, and 
a large number volunteered to do 
sewing. Cloth out in the proper pat- 
terns has been distributed, and the 
work of finishing the garments is go- 
ing on rapidly. It is hoped that 
enough clothes will be collected to 
make quite a respectable contribution 
by the time the next relief ship sails 
from New York. 




Ok Pheasant 

Bnut\? St.. Bmbcrst 

Breakfast, Luncheon, 
Afternoon Tea. 

Dinner if arranged for. 
Telephone 470 

Rooms for Transients, 

^Teachers Exchange 

O/ Bast on 120 B.tyl ston St. 

Recommends Teachers, Tutors and Schools 



An Especially Good Commission Proposition— 

Cash for test orders— Article wiil.lv Advertised— 
Cuts down expense in powei plants- Address 

EN(.INERKIN<; hlil'I'IN Co. MJB V i|t!> Miret, 

Philadelphia, Pa, 



1 They*rm not short-lived 

The Jerseys 




In 1913 eighteen Jcr«icy 
cows were oiliciaily tested 
which averaged Ij years 
a, id 7 tnonllis ol ace. Their 
average milk production 
\.asKi 7 pounds. Average 
butter 1 .1, S 7 pounds. One 
of i! 1 c cows was over 18 
years old. 

txtnufvltv, Con-t'fu''on <•■ ' Economic 

I'nntlh mm uie Jei> y e Kit t . leuslics. 

TIE AMERICAN JERSEY CATTLE II IB 
32f W. 234 St., New V rk ( ity 



CO] ' 



|E*S $238 

FOUNTAIN PEN 



NON-LtAKA 



ANO 

UP 



Minimize your fountain pen 
troubles by owning a Moore's. ft It is the 
safest, soundest and most dependable pen known. 
ft Its strength lies in its very simplicity. Nothing 
fin iky to get out of order. <! You can give your- 
self no better treat than a Moore's Non-lcakable. 

For Sate by Dealer* Everywhere 

American Fountain Pen Company 

Adams, Cuahing & I -osier, Selling AgMtt 
DEVONSHIRE STREET 11 si BOSTON, MASS. 



v\ 



h 



E. Frank Coe Fertilizers 



1857 



THE BUSINESS FARMERS' STANDARD 
FOR OVER FIFTY-FIVE YEARS 



1914 




Do You Raise 300 Bushels of Potatoes p*r Acre? 

|HREE hundred bushels per acre is 
nol an unusual yield by any means, 
but did you get it this year ? 
< ll you were planning to raise 300 
bushels of potatoes to the acre how 
far apart would you space your rows? 

How far apart would you drop the seed pieces in 

the row? 

•JHow much fertilizer would you use to grow 
bushels of potatoes per acre? How would 
apply it ? 

•JAre you sure that your seed potatoes arc true to 
name and true to type ? 

flWhat are you doing to prevent "scab," and tarlv 
and late blight ? 

<JDid you have a short crop of potatoes because of 
dry weather? Have you decided how you will 
overcome this trouble in the future ? 



300 
>ou 



f All these 
■" w book 



practical points, and many more, are fully covered an our 



ft 



"Potatoes: A Money Crop 

which will be sent free to every potato grower who requests a copy, and 
mentions this paper. 

QThis book is written by • man who himself nu bad years of experience as 
a potato grower, and who has made a careful study of the best methods of 
other growers. 

<J!f you rend this book you witl keep it for future reference. Ii it a "worth 
while" ptihlicnlinn 



The Coe-Mortimer Company 

51 CHAMBERS STREET, NEW YORK CITY 




I 







8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Dec. 15,^9^ 



JOIN THE BUNCH AT 



EPSTEIN'S TAILORING PARLORS 

Now located over post ..Mice. Up une fllglit 

Pressing and Cleaning a Specialty 

Liberal Ticket System ftl j6M 

T. MIEXTKA. 

SHOE STORE 

Shoes Repaired by Machinery 

SHOE SHINE 

Open Sunday from 7-1*. On your way to P. 0, 

The Highland Hotel 

Corner o( Hillman and Barnes StfWtS, tpW 
blocks from the Union Depot, it • ***** J** 
telry run on the BafOpSM I'Un. It U &** *•? 
from Main Street, IWH from the noise and dust 
and vet in the center of the business district. 

Its room* are well furnished and comfortable, 
havinu a telephone and hot .ind cold running 
water in every room. Prices SI and up; rooms 
with bath (single) »l.50 and up. 

Its excellent cuisine and well ventilated dining 
room makes a meal a pleasant *g**£3PVZi 
thm* of the highest quality, well cooked and 
served in the best possible manner. 

Stay at the Highland Hotel ««•*»*,£"£!" 
anticipate staying there again. Music every 
evening. 

D. H, SIEVERS, 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Offers courses of instruction in twenty-seventeaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 



Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 
Agricultural Chemistry 



FOUNTAIN PENS 

Moore's Swans 

Waterman's 

Thirty-six dozen pens to select from. 



OUR RULE 

Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded." 



• 4 



HinliUi.il tlt'H-1, 



Sitrlngllrlil, M»»«, 



STUDEVT FBIIIIITOHE 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New Kn 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 

K. U. MARSH EST AT K 



Economic Entomology 

Microbiology 

Plant Physiology and Pathology 

Agricultural Education 

Rural Social Science 

For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 

KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, RRES,DENT 

AMHERST. MASS. 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



C. A. Peters, Secretary 
Associate Alumni, ».i.u,;,. u PhlUu H. Smith, Secretary 

Joint Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics, 1 hilip * Trea8Ure r 

M. A. C. Athletic Fied Association, 



KaTABl.tBBBD 19M 

Stephen Lane Folobk 

MANUrAOTURINO JBWBLKR 

ISO BROADWAY, NEW YORK 

OLUB AND COLLEGE 

PINS AND RINGS a* 

aou>. -n.ru ajtd bbonm -■»•" 



The College Semite, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Ride club, 

Roister Doisters 

Musical Association, 

Nineteeu Hundred Fifteen Index, 

Niueteen Hundred Sixteen Index, 



E. Towne, President 
J. A. Price, Manager I 
S. Prouty, Manager 
E. F. Clark, Manager 
E. S. Draper, Manager 
H. Bishop, Manager 
It. M. Upton, President 
J F Nicholson, Producing and Business Manager 
Jr,i f" A. Anderson, Manager 

H. M. Rogers, Manager 
L. E. Fielding, Mauager 




M. A. C Christian Association, 
M. A. C. Catholic Club, 
Fraternity Conference, 
Stockbridge Club, 



H. H. White, President 

J. E. Harper, President 

F. W. Buell, President 

p. F. Whitmore, President 



EAHAB'S INN 

Northampton. MuochuietU 

TWO BLOCKS FBOM THE DEPOT 

The hotel where there is comfort (with 
out extravagance.) More popular 
than ever. 

Spec Oil Luncheon 12— 2 P. M. 

PRIVATE DININC ROOMS 
Ala Carte Service 

Irom 6 30 to II P. M. 



COX SONS 

— ANO — 

VINING 



7 a-74 Madison Avenue. New York 



APS AND GOWNS 

Best Materials and Workmanship 



There are Seyen Good Reasons why youshould 
buy your 

COAL 

or 

C. R. ELDER 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

a 7 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



Stationery, Newspapers, 
Magazines and Col- 
lege Supplies 



The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Mt., alongside the 
famous Bloody Brook battle ground 
to Old Deerfield, thence to Green- 
field, Turners Falls and across the 
"Plains" to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 

50 Mile* of Trackage -flodern 
Equipment -Train Dispatch- 
ing System- Freight and Ex- 
press Service over entire Haw. 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
C~ 



CARS 



Leave AOQIE COLLEOE for MOL- 
YOKE at 18 mla. past *■»• hour. 

CARS 

Leave AMHERST tor AOOIE COL- 
LEOE at 7 and *7 ■!■.»■« tht turn. 

Car* at 



I 



AMHERST & SUNDERLAND ST. RY. CO ' 



LUNCHES 

SODA, 



ICE CREAM 



Chttd $*ly frm* i A. M. h 4 A. M. 



HASTEN* 

Newsdealer. 
Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manu facturers < 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer ™^ T g™I 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

JACOB REED'S SONS, 

Makers of "Gold Medal Uniforms." 



For a Daily and Sunday Newspaper 
You should Read 

THIS 

Springfield Republican 

While you are at college in Amherst 

U ^ae N ii r TO* «. A. C. H«ws 

Tti« Rett SportlM* K«wi 

Fall e.. ti.rni >«• « ■ 

A m ron« Editorial Fag* 

lufi mtlnr — -*-— « 

It 1 • a ttmti USsrspapse 



1434-1426 Chcitnut St., 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



Daily, 3 cents ; 70 cents a month ; W 
a quarter, 
Sunday, $ eenta; 5© cents a quarter. 

Subscribe b T m»il or through the A mhe/»t •' 





mKA KY of 1 



w FEP 1 1915 



MASSACHUSETTS AGKICULTURAL 




Vol. XXV. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, January 5, 1915. 



No, 14 



ROISTER DOISTERS TOUR 

NEW YORK SUCCESSFULLY 



DARTMOUTH WINS AT 

ARENA BY TWO GOALS 



MUSICAL CLUBS WELL PRINCETON VICTORICUS IN 

RECEIVED ON BOSTON TRIP UNINTERESTING GAME 



Remarkable Showing Made by Cast in 

"Her Husband's Wife" on 

Christmas Trip. 

Greeted everywhere by the most 
enthusiastic audiences, the annual 
iniil-winter tour of the Roister Dois- 
ters proved to be the most complete 
success in the history of the dramatic 
society. Everyone gave their un- 
qualified praise to the work of the 
society and stamped it as the l>est 
production given by amateurs that 
has been seen around New York for 
years. The itinerary of the trip 
included Montague, Paterson, N. J., 
Far Rockaway and Jamaica, N. Y. | 
Bach audience was so hearty in its 
praise that future engagements in 
these places seem assured. 

The first performance was given 
iu the town hall at Montague on Dec. 
16. For a first performance the 
play went ven well *ith fe* hitches 
and the audience applauded vigor- 
ously, the work of Clark ami 
Andrews l>eing especially appre- 
ciated. The members of the cast 
fairly outdid themselves and their 
interpretations of the various char- 
acters were particularly pleasing. 

The New York trip lasted from 
Dec. i'H-31, the first performance 
being given in Paterson at the Normal 
school No. 24 under the auspices of' 
the Senior A class. The men, in- 
eluding the orchestra, met in New 
York, part coming from Uostoo via 
the Fall River line and pari coming 
from Amherst via New London. 
At Paterson the play was sup-rhly 
executed ami was most uprojjroiisly 
received by the huge audience. All 
the rough edges had been polished 
off and with the increased wardrobe. 
wrhteh tlie club now possesses, the 
I 'lay was run off rers' smoothly and 
with plenty of vim. The execution 
of the girl parts was so well carried I 
out that many curtain calls for Wil- 

1 1, Andrews and Patterson were 
dema nded . After the show dancing 
»a* in order until 11-SO. 

The next stop was made at F'ar 
Kockawny, N. Y., where **ller Hus- 

nid'a Wife" was presented in the 
1 ;ife Gaiety under the auspices of 
'he Episcopal church. The line 

mmintmeots of the stage and scen- 
ery lent a great deal to a most 

xeellent performance. A smoother, 



First Boston Game Well Played, Mass- 
achusetts Losing by the 
Score of 4-2, 

Though defeated by Dartmouth's 
hockey team at the Boston Arena on 
Thursday night, the score, t-i\ Indi- 
cates that the M. A. C. team made 
the Green septet play hard for every 
point. Dartmouth's expectation of 
an easy victory was severely upset, 
the Maroon and White sending sev- 
eral scare* into the Dartmouth con- 
tingent oy taking the lead early iu the 
game and allowing nothing better 
than a tie score up to within two sec- 
onds of the end of the first half In 
the second half, the Green got but 
one goal, and several limes the 
Aggies threatened to overcome this 
lead before the end of the contest. 

That the Affile team would per- 
form Well WaS eXpes *ed . V tl •■ 850 

Aggie mote a, who had visions of 

seeing the Green gu down to defeat. 

The »» i ii' started with ;i rash h> 




[Continued on page 6 1 



C'aitain Anciinuio 

the Dartmouth puck advancers, who 

endeavored to race through the 
Aggie team for goals. WHiuimaker, 
Holmes, and Murchie led in these 
attacks; but each was unsuccessful, 
their lack of learn piny ami the Aggie 
defense being responsible. The Dart- 
mouth attack was re peated ly broken 



[Continued on page %\ 



Waltham, Somerville and Hingham 

Audiences All Enjoy 

Program. 

The tii Ht Fasteru trip of the Musi- 
cal clubs proved to be highly satis- 
factory and not only were the differ- 
ent audience* well entertained but 
also the men themselves had a very 

enjoyable time Concerts were given 
in Waltham and Hingliain on Mon- 
day and Tuesday nights respectively, 
and on Thursday, Friday and Satur- 
day, afternoon and evening, the 
Glee club appeared in the Somerville 
Theater. Except for the latter, all 
of the engagement! were run under 
she auspices of the clubs. 

The expectations concerning the 
Glee elub were fulfilled with good 
measure. Its varied assortment of 
songs were encored repeatedly. The 
I ■'.•.- etui . emed ' be particularly 
well balanced this rem and Mr. John 
Bland is to be congratulated fur his 

good work not only in coaching the 
men but also in selecting the music. 
Worlhley '18, proved to lie a line 
soloist and acquitted himself uoblv. 
lie was repeatedly encored and sang 
■•In Old Madrid," wonderfully well. 
The "River of Doubt" written by 

•■ Manager tndereon was the "hit" 
of the trip for the catchy words and 
air seemed lo appeal to the audiences. 
The .Mandolin club was seriously 
handicapped through the loss of 
Farrar. the leader, and at Hingham 
another man was absent which meant 

! that the true value of the club was 
not shown. F.ven with these draa - 
backi tin* men performed well and 
were particularly amusing iu "Hash" 
arranged by Anderson. This "Hash" 
was Intended to represent the quality 
served at the Dining Hall and the 

! audience was to judge for itself. 
On Monday afternoon the clubs 

' met in Waltham at Nutting's-on-the- 
Charies for a dress rehearsal. A 
better hall could not be desired, for 
it was capable of seating a thousand. 
The dance hall which would 
accommodate 500 people easily, was 
entirely surrounded by a broad 
promenade, separated from the hall 
by a low railing. From the center, 
countless numbers of fine paper 
streamers were draped to the sur- 
rounding walls and pillars, and here 
and there, nicely varnished and dec- 
orated canoes were hung. 

[Continued on page $\ 

r 



Large Crowd at Boston Arena See 
Aggie Play Poor Game. Lack- 
ing in Team Work. 

Massachusetts lost to Princeton in 
hockey Monday night at the Boston 
Arena by a It to I score. A large 
delegation of Aggie rooters turned 

(Nit to see | close, h;u d-foiigbt game 
that wns full of thrills and spectacu- 
lar plays. An extra period seemed 
imminent lint the gong saved the day 
for Princeton, 

The lack of team work was Aggie's 
principal failing, the showing ngainsl 
Dartmouth being much lietter in this 
respect. The work of the defense 

w.-is good and inanv 1'iiineton rushes 
wire broken up. The offense on the 

other band seemed unable to work 
together Jiihi resorted too much to 
individual play. Ilt'j>c»tedh Jolm- 
f'son liiiike hw;1\ fi mi the sertmiri 
with the puck, but there was no one 
with him. Iu the second period, 
Ross collided with the two Princeton 




lil TTBIUCK, tiOAI. 

defensive men and was carried from 

tin- ice. However, the Princeton 
defense was materially broken up 
and Johnson shot the goal. 

Ilutterick was the sfiir of the even- 
ing and performed in fine stvle in the 
goal. His coolness smd alertness 
(saved the team from a bad defeat 
| Boss played well both defensively 







The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan.' 5, 1915- 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 5, 1915. 



and in currying the puck, while John- 
sou showed up well on the forward 
line. For Princeton, Peacock ex- 
colled, for it was his defensive work 
that repeatedly broke up the Aggie 
attack. 

Princeton Btarted off with a rush 
and made two goals in the first few 
minitcs of play. The first resulted 
from a pun gift by Uoss who, in at- 
tempting to knock the puck out of 
danger, passed it into Ids own goal. 
Pour minutes later, a quick pass from 
behind the goal was snapped by 
Schoen for the second score. No 
more scoring was done l>y either team 
.luring the remainder of the period. 
Hutterick made some remarkable 
stops, and once when fully IS players 
were massed in front of the goal, he 
saved a score even though he lost his 
stick during the scrimmage. Prince- 
ton made 9 shots at the Aggie goal 
and only one was successful in this 

period. 

Iu the second period after ten min- 
utes of scoreless playing, Peacock 
snatched the puck out of a scrimmage 
and carried it through the Aggie 
defense. A quick pass to Hills 
resulted in the third score. Immedi- 
ately following this play, Ross carried 
the puck through the entire team to 
the defense. After his collision 
Johnson snapped the puck into the 
goal. A minute later, Johnson 
carried the |»uek through the entire 
team :iml Oflged a pretty goal from a 
long snot. J MM before the period 
ended, be leeaed on the point of 

repeating his performance when he 
was tripped by Humphrey, but the 
gong rang ami the game was over. 
The quality of hoekey shown by 
both team- was not of the highest 
unlet but the even playing and occa- 
sional bursts of epeed kept the intei- 
est of the crowd at all times. 

To date the team has won but one 
game this season but, with the excep- 
tfofl of the Williams game the show- 
ing of the men has been creditable. 
At the conclusion of the game 
Aggie men played a large part in a 
game between the alumni of Arling- 
ton and Melrose high schools. Jones, 
Hutchinson. Hutterick. McDonald 
and Woolcy taking part. 

The score of the Piinceton game : 




did at various parte of the B. P. I. 
game. However, R. P. I. »* «»<* a 
fair example of the opponents ahead. 
Saturday's game was the first in two 
years on their home rink and their 
first game of the season. Last year 
her only game was against Williams. 

Line-up : 
m. a. c. 



KENSSELAEK. 

g, McQuide 

p, Livingston 

cp, Ainsworth 



Hockey Team, 1914-1915 



Ituttrick, f 
Ross, p 

Archibald, (Capl ) cp 
Wooley, lw lw, Thompson, Tryon 

Chisholm, rw rw, t. Woodwarth, TdU-y 
Fernald (Wildon) c c, Page (Captam) 
Johnson, r '• Huntington 

Score: M. A. C. 8; R.H. I.o. Referee 
—Granger of Springfield Y. M. C. A. 
College. Judges— Draper of M. A. C, 
and Matthews of R. F- I. Timers- 
Gore of M. A. C. and Just of R. P. I. 
Periods-ao, 15 minutes. Stops by But- 
trick, 6; by McQuade, 22. 



WILLIAMS-RENSSELAER TRIP 
The hockey team lost the first game 



|-KIS< KT--N 

Schoen, Skelly, rw 

Cowan, c 

W. Humphreys, r 

Hills, lw 

I Humphreys, cp 

Peacock, p 

Cohu, g 



M. A. C. 

lw, Wolley 

c, Chisnolm 

r, Johnson 

rw, Kernald, Wilton 

cp, Ross, Fernald 

p, Archibald 

g, liuttertck 



Score— Princeton 3, M. A. C. 2. Goals 
— First period : Ross (tor Princeton),jm.; 
schoen, 7m. Second period ; Hills, rem. 
50*.; Johnson, 14m 25s } Johnson, iSm, 
4 os. Referees- Hicks and Dourly. 
Umpires— Carleton and Shea. Tim.. 
Gordon. Time— ao minute periods. 

hold Warren 

South Deerfleld, Maw. 

T. J, AHERN, MANAGE* 



of the season when it was defeated 
2-0 by Williams on their home rink 
on Dec. 1 «. The game was not called 
until 4-30 o'clock and the coram' na- 
tion of a small rink and electric 
lights caused the demoralization of 
the game into one of "shinny." The 
Massachusetts team, though handi- 
capped by unusual conditions, was 
clearly outplayed. During the first 
half they were weak in both defense 
aud offense, Williams continually 
keeping the puek in dangerous terri- 
tory. M. AC was lacking in both 
»*pep" and team-work. She made 
five trials at the Williams goal while 
the Turple made seven in the first 
bulf but the shots were from long 
distances and most of them went 
wide. Shooting, in fact, was one 
of the weak points of the Maroon and 
White. In the second half the puck 
was in Williams territory a good 
share of the time but no goals mater- 
ialized. In this part of the game, M. 
A. C made two more shots than 
Williams did. But when the puck 
was in the Purple district she sent 
two or three men into the goal, gard- 
iug it effectively. 

The game was rough throughout, 
Williams taking more the initiative 
in this direction. Each side had a 
few men out of the game at vaiious 
stages. -Whistle" Wooley had a 
p.iiicularly uuueroiM rivalry with 
his opponent and the pair caused 
much merriment for the spectators. 
"Dave" Buttriek was seriously han- 
dicapped by guarding the goal by 
■rttfictai light for the first time of 
the year, the lights being snapped 
on in the middle of the first period. 
However, he did good work, stopping 
all but two of the down shots, the 
fault of the goals lying mainly with 
his team-mates who allowed the puck 
to prevail in too dangerous territory. 
The losing of the game was a 
disappointment hut it showed the 
Massachusetts team their weak points 
and will probably have a good effect 
on the season's scores. On Feb. St, 
if the ice is good, the team from the | 



Berkshircs will be met again in Am- 
herst aud a hard try will be made to 
make up for the first defeat. 
The line-up : 

WILLIAMS. **• *• C ' 

Cole, g g. Kuit'ick 

MacNamee, p P, Ro* 5 

Levain, cp cp, Archibald (CapU 

C. Cutler, (Capt | c c, Fernald 

Coleman, Conklin lw lw, Wooley 

Dewmdt, Rochester rw rw, Chisholm 
H. Cutler, r 

Score: Williams 2, M 
—Smith ol M. A. C. and Banks of 
Williams. Referee— Peacock of Pitts- 
rield. Time -so and 15 minute halves. 
Goals by C. Cutler 2. Stops by But- 
trick S; by Cole 10. 



THE DARTMOUTH GAME 

[Continued from page 1] 



r, Johnson 
A. C. o. Judges: 



RENSSELAER GAME 
The second game of the first trip 
of the season netted more satisfac- 
tory results when the team defeated 
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 8-0 
at Troy. Aside from the score, the 
game was much more pleasing. On 
a rink three times the size of that of 
Williams, toe team was able to dis- 
play its speed and skated rings 
around its opponents. Time and 
again the Maroon and White made 
invincible rushes the length of the 
rink, -only the slushy snrface and the 
excellent work of the B. P. I. Fresh- 
man goal-tender keeping down the 
Bcore. The puck was continually in 
Rensselaer territory. During the 
Bret half, M, A. C. made f0 shots 
while her opponents made but one. 

The game started with a rush when 
Fernald caged a goal at the end of a 
minute end a half. After eight min- 
utes more Johneon made a goal and 
later another at the end of 16 min- 
utes of play. In the second half 
Fernald again made the first goal 
after a little ovei four minutes. Roes 
soon caged another and Johnson 
another. Chisholra and Wooley 
soon made the goals that ended the 
total of eight. 

This game, coming after the Wil- 
liams defeat, showed the team its 
capabilities, With every man play- 
ing every second, different results 
arc obtained. Johnson has the mak- 
ing of a speedy star if he will always 
display the energy end speed that he 



up, and Johnson and Chisholm, play- 
ing forwards, advanced the puck to 
the vicinity of the Dartmouth goal. 
In fact, these two Aggie forwards 
were very noticeable, their dribbling 
and passing being one of the features 
of the evening. After several trials 
for goals which were neatly turned 
aside by Donahue, the Green goal- 
tender, Dartmouth seemed to awak- 
en, and with a series of brilliant 
passes, they succeeded in keeping 
the puck in Aggie's territory. Sev- 
eral times it looked like a Dartmouth 
acore, but each time the cumbersome 
form of Buttriek interrupted the 

puck. 

Twice, with Fernald, Chisholm and 
Johnson leading the attack, the M. 
A. C. team ventured with unbooked 
for speed and ability into Dart- 
mouth's territory, and though the 
first trial was broken up by the 
Green's defense, the second attack 
was too much for it, and in three 
minutes and seven seconds of play. 
Fernald had taken a pass from John- 
son and shot a goal past Donahue 
for the first score of the game. This 
score served to add some fight to the 
Dartmouth seven, end with Wana- 
maker and Tuek doing the bulk of 
the rushing, two Dartmouth goals 
were scored in the sneceeding four 
minutes. Thee Roes, playing cover- 
point, smashed another threatening 
rally, and made a epectacular drib- 
bling rush up the ice past the whole 
Dartmouth team, and evened up toe 
acore with a pretty shot. With but 
a few more seconds to play, W ana- 
maker, the reknowned Green rover, 
succeeded in slipping the rubber 
puck pest Buttriek for a score after 
a wonderful exhibition of dribbling. 

In the second half, both sevens 
showed more team play, and a stellar 
exhibition of defensive work, eepe- 
cially marked on Aggie's part. But 
trick, at goal, was easily toe star, 
cutting off 81 out of the 86 trie* 
made by the Dartmouth aggregation, 
and giving toe audience one of th< 
finest exhibitions of goal tending 



ever seen at the Arena. Captain 
ArcbibaldJTand Ross ably assisted 
Buttriek in fighting off the numerous 
onslaughts of the Dartmouth centers, 
and holding the Green to one tally. 
After seven and one-half minutes of 
phiy, Bowler received the puck from 
Tuck and placed it in the net for the 
final score of the game. 

The Maroon and White had sev- 
eral opportunities to even up the 
score, but a lack of team work, and 
some brilliant work by Wauamaker, 
checked each rally. This period 
was marred by rough playing by both 
sides, several players being put off 
the ice for a minute or two. How- 
ever, the game was one of the fastest 
and most exciting yet seen at the 
Arena this season. Wanamaker and 
Tuck starred for the Green, while 
Johnson, Ross and Buttriek featured 
for Aggie. 

The lineup and summary : 



UAKTMOUTH. 

Holmes, Tyler, lw 
Tuck, c 
Wanamaker, r 
bowler, Gale, rw 
Murchie, cp 
Currier, Livermore, p 
Donahue, R 



M. A. c. 

rw, Fernald, Wildon 

c, Chisholm 

r, Johnson 

lw, Wooley 

cp, Ross 

p, Archibald 

g, Buttriek 



Score — Dartmouth 4, M. A. C. a. 
Coals— Fernald 3m. 7s., Tuck 4m. 53s., 
Wanamaker 6m. 58s , Ross 9m. 20s, 
Wanamaker 19m. 58s, bowler 7m., 39s. 
Rebre«s— Dr. Tmgley and Ernie Doody 
Goal umpires — Winship and Jones 
Timers— Woods and HOI. Time— Two 
20-minute periods. Attendances — uoo. 



THE MUSICAL CLUB TRIP 

f Continued trom page 1] 

The concert began at « promptly 
and lasted until 9-30. Fully 500 
people attended even though only a 
little over 100 tickets had previously 
been sold. Aggie men from sur- 
rounding towns and cities flocked in 
large numbers to make the affair a 
success. The tickets were only 35 
cents which was very moderate consid- 
ering the high cost of the hall. The 
concert was immediately followed 
by dancing nnUl 11-30. The music 
was furnished by the "Colonial Or- 
chestra*' nude up of Aggie men, aud 
provided very satisfactory dance 
music. Most of the men were enter- 
tained over night in Waltham. 

Late Tuesday afternoon, Hi ugh am 
was visited. The townspeople gave 
the men a fine reception,enteitaining 
them from the time they arrived un- 
til they left toe next morning. Al- 
though there was a conflict of dates 
at Hingham aud another dance was 
run that night, toe attendance at the 
concert was not materially diminished, 
and 200 people turned out on one of 
the worst nights the clubs could have 
had, for it not only rained but each 
side-walk was a glare of ice, making 
walking exceedingly precarious. Fol- 
lowing the concert, there was dancing 
until 12. 

The program for Waltham and 
Hingham was as follows : 



HART one. 

1, a. Fight on to Victory Griggs '13 

b. Dear Old Massachu- 
setts Griggs '13 

Glee Club 

2. The Hell of Shandon Nevin 

Quartet 

3, Solo Selected 

Worthley 

4. Swing Along Cook 

Glee Club 

5. Evolution Rag Allen 

Mandolin Club 

6. Serenade Koellner 

Glee Club 

PART TWO. 

7. Little Jack Horner Caldicott 

Glee Club 

8. La Spagnnle 

Mandolin Club 

9. Katy Did Ashford 

Quartett 

io. Hong Kong Romance Hadley 

Glee Club 

11. Hash Arg. by Andeison '16 

String Ouartet 

12. Sons of Old Massachu- 

setts Knight 'o 

Combined Clubs 

The following men made the trip : 
Anderson, manager ; Henderson, as- 
sistant manager. 

Glee Club : First tenors, Swan 
'16, Dodge * 16, Nims '17; second 
tenors, Towne '15, leader of the club, 
Hatfield 'I.*», Worthley '18, Verba k 
'16; first bassos, Moherg '15, R. 
E. Tower '15, Blanpied '16; second 
bassos, Hildreth Mo. W. It. Tower 
'15, Lawrence *17, Thayer '17. 

Muntlnliii Cluh; First mandolins, 
Johnson 'L*«, Kernald M6, Worthley 
'18; seco id mandolins, Mattoon'lfi, 
White IS; third Bandoline, Goodwin 
'18, G. C. Howe M 8, Chapman M8; 
guitar, Richardson, violin, Tower. 

Cab mini Or*-h extra : K. K. Tower 
and Goodwin, violins, Mitchel Mh, 
cornet. Hunt M6, flute, Laird 'lft, 
piano, Gushing M6, drums, A. K. 
Howe, 'cello. 

Thursday afternoon, the Glee 
club went to the Somerville Theatre. 
The rehearsal proved so successful 
to the management that it was de- 
cided to put the Glee club act last 
instead of second. The men were 
arrayed in their * 1 » ill suits, for the 
scene was to present a night on the 
campus, hence "Campus (K) nights," 
the title of the act, which lasted a 
half an hour. Saturday night was 
"Aggie night" and the theatre was 
in the hands of M. A. C. men, who 
were in one section. When the Glee 
clubs appeared they were given a 
tremendous hand-clapping and each 
selection was greeted in a similar 
manner. M. A. C. was certainly 
well advertised in Somerville. 

During the act, the following songs 

were sung : 

Aggie My Aggie ( iriggs 

Swing Along Cook 

I Want to Linger Kemick 

Winter Song Bullard 
River of Doubt Anderson '16 

Serenade Koellner 
Sons of Old Massachusetts Knight '02 



DR. R. C. 

Dentist 
NASH'S BLOCK 

Evenings by Appointment, 



LAUMOVIT2 

TAII.OK ASH 1'|<|.ss| K. 

dents' Furnishings -Dress Suits to 
Rent- Drill Oloves and Collars 

Ticket Svstsm. 

II Anill.v si. IMlOlie 



Are You a Spug ? 

That Is a Member ol the Society for Promo- 
tion of Useful Giving. 



There is certainly nothing more useful than clothing, and nothing 
more personal or that would be more appreciated. 

We are well supplied with a slock of seasonable merchandise that 
cannot lail to win your approval. 

Incidentally we are never undersold. 

Let us help you with your Christmas buying. 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



IVCXriOES ! 

Twenty-five cents will be put in a box for the 
NEW ATHLETIC FIELD every time you 
buy shoes at our store costing $3.50 or over. 

VERY LATEST STYLES. 

Shoes for the Drill- $2.50 to $5.00 



E*ea;e*#s >%lioc* Store 

Scbooi and College Photographers . . . 




LOCALLY: 5* Center St., Northampton, Mass., 

and South Hadley, Mast. 



Main Office; 

15461548 Broadway, 

New York City 



Thete Studios offer the l>est skilled 
artists and most complete 

equipment obtainable 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



-DEALERS IN- 



Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 





The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 5, 1 9 ' 5 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 5, 1915. 




THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOAHD OF EDITORS 

PRANK W. BUKIX 'li, Editnr-i 

TVI.F.K 5, ROGERS '16, Managing 

HENRY II, WHITE '15, Assistant 

JAMES A, ERU'E'ii. Athletic 

E. SUM NEK DRAPER 'ij, Athletic 
THOS.I.. II AR ROCKS '16. Department 
ALFRED A. GIOIOSA V>. Campus 
FRANK J SCIIEl'FELE, Minimi 

MIl.FORD K. I.A\VRENCE'i7. 

Associate 

RICHARD \V. SMITH '17, Associate 



n-Chief 

Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 

Editor 
Editor 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

MAURICE J. CLOUGH '15. Business Managtr 
CHAS A.HUNTINGTON, JR. '16. 

Assistant Business Manager 
W. RICHARDSEARS'n Advertising Man'g'r 
LESTER E. FIEI.DIVG '16, Ass't Adv. Mgr. 
BIRGER R. ROSEQUIST'17, Circulation 



one. Let us have less of the frater- 
nity awl find predjudice, less of the 
striving for personal attainments rod 
more eo-o|>eration ami broad miml- 
edn«SI in all our college life. 



Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies, s cents. Make all orders payable 
to Maurice J. Ci.ouoh. 

Entered u »econd-class matter it the Amherst 
Poet Offlc*. 

Vol. XXV. Tuesday, Jan. 5. No. 14 



CotXKOt activities made their best 
■bowing during the past vacation and 
the excellent work done by members 
of the hockey team, musical clubs 
and Roister Dolstew will, doubtless, 
:wld much to the reputation of the 
undergraduate body of this institu- 
tion. College advertising, in other 
words, as it is understood today was 
well managed 1>\ these organizations, 
and much credit is due them for their 

work. 

■ important factor in 
jf^yuBHlU'grauliiatt' repu- 
tation, bajrerwr.. Anvertising has its 
plate and a fo fctfHfet one too. but the 
morale of the whole student hody is 
the tine controlling factor in Ameri- 
can college eommunities. 

Our chief l.on.st i* the Ageie spirit. 
A lnoad di-mocracy is what it is, in 
reality, and that democracy must be 
maintained if "Aggie spirit" is to 
continue to be a liy-wnnl of tlusbns 

of this college. 

The ni|wl growth of the college, the 
iiii teaming nuiiib«r of fraternities and 
the formation of n non-fraternily 
organization arc all factors that are 
undermining demociacvat this insti- 
tution. 

It is reaaonnble to sup|>ose, ns a 
8tu<li 'lit passes fiom his freshman 
veur to his senior \ ear. that he will 
tind increasing evidence* of democ- 
racy ns it is the upper utMWfl that 
govern interchips actpiaintnnces in 
college life — in other words it is the 
juniors or seniors that will make 
friends with the freshmen and not the 
Other way around.' This increase has 
been our experience but democracy 
Is not growing rapidly enough in our 
estimate, as we now attain the final 
step of undergraduate life. To the 
freshman of today. Aggie must seem 
far less democratic than it appeared 
to the verdant members of 1 9 In four 
years ago. 

There con be no definite remedy 
suggested for this slow growing, in- 
sidious evil other than a personal 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

[ Notices for this column should be dropped in 
the Coiik(.ian Office or handed to Alfred A, 
Gioiosa "16, 00 or before the Saturday preceding 
eiich issue. 1 

January 6. 
1-00 P. M.— Memorial services for Dean 

Mills in chapel. 
8-30 P M.— Hockey,Yale at New Haven, 

January 7. 
6-45 P. M— M. A. C. C. A. in chapel. 
8-50 P. M— Hockey, Columbia at New 
Haven. 

January 8. 
7-30 P. M — Cilee club rehearsal in chapel. 

January 9, 
2 ',0 P. M— Hockey- West Point at 
West Point. 
January 10. 
915 A. M. — Sunday chapel to be an- 
nounced. 

January 12. 

2-30 P. M— Hockey— Springfield Y. M 

C. A. at Amherst. 
5 00 P. M.— Junior class sing In chapel 
700 P. M — Stockbiirlge club in South 

College. 
7-15 P. M.— Landscape Art club in Wild 

er hall. 
7 30 P. M.— (dee club rehearsal in 

chapel. 
7 30 P. M.— Bible class at Dr Chamber, 

Iain's. 

January 13. 
1-10 P M — Assembly to be announced 



REXALL Baby Cough Syrup 



For a young cough. 



REXALL Cherry Bark Comp. 

For your cough. 

Each 25 cents a bottle 



HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The REXALL Store on the Corner 



UNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

K KG l I.Alt SUNDAY SERVICE AT 7 PM. 



E. RUSSELL NORTON 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 



MODERN REPAIR DEPT. 



SALES AGENT 



ASSEMBLY 

Agricultural missions ill India was 
tin- subject discussed at the last 
assembly by Jewell B. Knight, M 
A. C. 1892, of Belchertown. Mr. 
Kniglit was well qualified to speak <»u 
this subject, for immediately after 
the great famine in India in 1899- 
1900, he went to India and spent i>\<> 
years there In missionary work along 
agricultural lines. After this he 
was offered a position as professor of 
agriculture bv the British govern- 
ment in the Kngineering college. 
This college, Mr. Knight said, lias 
a faculty of tenor eleven professors, 
and IfiO students. There is good 
spirit, and it is hoped that it will 
soon be as large as M. A. ('. now is. 
In describing the conditions as lie 
found them Mr. Knight >aid : "In 
India there are three castes. 01 divis- 
ions, of the countrymen. The 
upper caste is far superior to the 
others In intelligence and ability. 
The greater pmrt of the students at 
the college are from this group, 
which constitutes 10 per cent of the 
people. The second class is com- 
posed of the working people, such as 
carpenters, blacksmiths, etc. The 
other division is composed of people 
very low in intelligence and habits. 
It is upon thU last caste that the most 
missionary inlluenee is expended, and 
most of the converts are from these 
people. 

"We must get hold of their daily 
life if we are to reach them with onr 



Davenport Miller 
Vein Coal 

Best Quality Pennsylvania Coal 



E.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOF.MAN 



E. E. MILLETT 

JEWELER and OPTOMETRIST 

Lenses ground while you wait 

College Jewelry 

Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and Guitar Strings 

AMHERST, MASS. 
Next to Post Office. 



BOSTON OFFICE 
85 Water St. 



NEW YORK OFFICE 
1 Broadway 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

CURRAN & DYER, Props. 

Loose- Leaf Note Books and Fountain 
— Pens— 



Amherst 



CO - OP LAUNDRY 

High-Grade College Work 



Shirts. 
Collars, 
Cuffs, - 
Plain wash. 
Same, rough dry, 



10-15C 
3 i-ac 

s I-2C 

48c per doz. 
30c per doz. 



DRY CLEARING AHD PRESSING 

Steam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, $1.50 a Suit 

R.T. F«osT,Atetit; D.Sherinyak. Asst, Agent 
Try our ticket system 

Put full name and address on laundry 



Come to us for- 



The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

I.ibbersof Wrought Iron and Brass Pipe, Valves 
t nd Fittings fur Steam, Water and Gas. Asbestos 
ind Magnesia Boiler and Pipe Coverings, Pipe 

ut to Sketch. Mill Supplies, Engineers and 
Contractors for Steam and Hot Water Heating, 
\utomatic Sprinkler Systems, Botlerand Engire 

onnections. - - Molyoke, Mass. 



We»«?r"v«?«l tf<»i* 



BECKMAN 



*• 1 1 « • • » 1 1 > 



LOW PRICE T » ILORING CO. 

SUITS MAPS 10 ORDER 

Suits Cleaned. Pies^ed and Oved All kindsnl 
Repairing !<>r Ladies ami Gentlemen neatly d >ne. 
His»h-grnde woik bv first class tailm Work 
, ailed fur and delivered, "sell tickets fur pressing 
4 suns fur gi ;o 

GEORGE KOfOWITZ, Prop. 

Main S treet , Amheist Mass. Nash Block 

On yout way to the I'osi Office, lei. i',S \V 



FLEMING'S SHOE STORE 



Northampton 



For particular people 

THE ELMS RESTAURANT 

213 Main St., Northampton 

(Near Amheist eai line) 



* Quality Restaurant at Moderate 
Prices. 

TRY OUR SPECIALS 

And a la carte service. 

OYSTERS STEAKS CHOPS 
FRIED CHICKEN, ETC. 

Open 6 A.M. to it p.m. 

FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

drown by the Floricultural Dent. 

We offer our surplus stock of cut 
flowers and plants at reasonable rates 
to students and faculty. This stock 
is frown in modern houses under 
ideal conditions. Roses, carnations, 
violets, chrysanthemums and sweet 
peas in season. 

QROWN ON 1 til CAMPUS 

I. |.h..lie SOO 



Fireplace Goods, Coat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils I WEBSTER S STUDIO 

Everything in Photography 



Always glad to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 



Including Framing. 

Oood work speaks for Itself. 

H'ash Block, Amherst, Mass. 



religious work. The low oaate see 

that their state is improved by th« i 
work of the missionary, and appre- 
ciate it. The second class, which is 
made up of GO per cent of the 3U0,« 
000,000 inhabitants, is scarcely 
reached at all by the missionaries. 

"There are several qualifications 
which a man must have in order to 
reach these people. First, farm 
experience at home in America ; sec- 
ond, a verv thorough knowledge of 
general principles of agricultural 
practice; third, a sympathetic nature, 
which is hard to maintain under the 
existing conditions ;fourth. patience to 
wait for results ; fifth, deep devotion ; 
sixth, one of the most Important and 
perhaps the rarest, ability to <jvt 
along well with fellow-workers. 

**As for equipment, $3*000 or 

14.000 capital will he necessary to 
purchase land, buildings, animals, 
implements and labor. 

"During the first I* months one 
must learn the conditions. Then he 
should get a small station and work 
there with the natives, whom he shall 
teach that the Christian religion is 
just as important as Hindu or auv 
other. The missionary must make 
all operations pay, by being well 
informed in agricultural economics, 
and he must be diplomatic, to gain 
the confidence of his natives. 

•'Although agriculture is import" 
ant. the religion is still more import- 
ant, and the eastern countries offer 
an excellent oppot tunity for men of 
enthusiasm to go out there and do a 
great work." 

CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 
Professor llacklmime gave a wry 
interesting talk at the Christian 
Association meeting of Dec. 17th, 
taking as his theme, "Sonic (oeat 
Religious Poems." The first of 
these religious poems, according to 
Professor Mackimmie, are the 
Psalms. They are a never-failing 
source of pleasure to the reader and 
often give a great deal of comfort to 

a person in trouble. 

"The Song of Solomon," though 
often called a religious poem with 
allegorical meaning, is probably only 
a love song. It Is Interesting to 
lead such a poem as this and then to 
reread it. giving it the meaning 
assigned by religious critics. The 
contrast between the two meanings 
is striking to say tin least. 

In reacting "Paradise Cost," as 
Other poems, we ire too apt to think 
of our reading as a task, not a pleas- 
ure. If we really hear the poem as 
well as read it with our eyes, we will 
realise the great dignity and iinpres- 
siveuess of Milton's language. In 
Dante's "Divine Comedy-" we have 
the work of a man who was not only 
a poet and artist, but a statesman. 
His chief ambition was for a united 
Italy and that the old struggle be- 
tween the pope and the holy Roman 
emperor should cease. Throughout 
the poem Dante pictures the suffer- 
ing in the next world of those who 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 



Mr. Campion has just returned from England with the 

AQUASCUTUM 

OVERCOATS 

Wells-Mar getson Neckwear, Caps & Knitted Vests 

On account of war it will not be possible to gv[ any more of 
these goods, so an early inspection will be to your advantage. 




Fine Tailoring Men's Furnishings 

See Our Agents 



Hubbard's BasE Fertilizers 



the most economical \ou can u*e, 

BetteR crops 




^RTILlZtB^ 



are the inevitable result 



THE ROGERS $ HUBBARD COMPANY, Middletown, Conn. 

Mill... nuil Wi.i t, . I '<> 1 1 1 i ii'l . Conn. 



W\ t £1 are supplied every year 

Burpee s Seeds *•** 

m can plain 

the seeds of any other growers. Do yon ki 
Quality "Seeds that Grow" ? If not, we woTiuTlike to 
make your acquaintance. Simply send us your address 
(a postal card will do) and you will receive Burpee's 
Annual for 1914, a bright new hook of 182 pages, which 
is recognized as "The Leading American Seed Catalog." 
Kindly write to-day! Address 



b 






W. ATLEE BURPEE & CO., Burpee Building,, Philadelphia 



F. A. S 




MEN'S 



Use our new cash discount card 
and save five per cent on 

SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING 

Furnishings and Custom Tailoring 



C&rpfrvter & Morshousf, 

PRINTERS, 



No i, Cook PUce, 



Amherst, Mim. 





The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 5, 1915- 



JORDAN MARSH COMPANY 

Boston 

TWO GREAT IHJILDISOS-OVER 1 ,000,000 SQUARE FEET 
OK FLOOR SPACE-I69 SEPARATE SELLING SECTIONS. 

For Room Furnishings, Wearing Apparel Unique and 
Practical Articles for Gifts- in fact each of the thousand 
TnTone things student life calls for-this store is the logi- 
cal s^ for the college men of New England. 

Our Clothing and Furnishing Store is just a step from 
Summer Street. Do not fail to visit when you are in Boston. 
It is filled with just tin- kind of toggery young men like. 
All Purchases delivered FREE to Amherst. 

Mail Outers given prompt attention. 



THE 



Hoover & Smith Go. 

616 Chaatimt St., Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 
Diamond Merchants 

Philadelphia's Official Fraternity Jeweler 

SPECIALISTS IN 
Fraternity Badges, Fobs. Novelties, 

Rings, Charms Prises Trophies. 

Medals College Pins, Fobs. Seals, 

Charms 



S. S. HYDE 

IjEWELKk & OPTICIAN 

Now At 13 Pleasant !-t. 
' Oculists' PttSCrti tious Filled. I'.ioken Lenses 

I .won.it.-U Replaced, lint- waldl Repairing 
Promptly and .-killully Don.-. 

iHtisl-ctinn Ituamnteed 



M 



BIDE-A-WEE 



»» 




& Snyder Co. 



T^TrN* Vol I 1 Kl OKI -sKIt* 
~sH ItMTKK HUKIJV 

-WHoLESALK I.EMEHS 



Creamed Chicken and Waffles 

Out specialty— And other good iliinijs to eat. 

MRS. L. M. STEBBINS, 
Middle Street, Hadley. Mass. 

Tel. 41) -W 



transgress in this. After st little 
patient thought we can easily see 
how very truly be make* the punish- 
ment fit the crime. The greatest 
power of the poem, however, lies in 
the beauty of its language, as written 
in his own Italian tongue. It is a 
language which lends itself well to 
poetry and in Dante's poems has a 
well defined swing and meter which 
makes them very effective. 



„„. Mutton. Lamb. Veal. Pork. Lard, Mam*. 

Bacon .i2Um*t: Poultry. U.me. Butter 

Chew, BajS, Beans. 

office* St,--. i(.SM7,» " ■ •; BlaelwtoaaSt 
ll,tt*n P«VTnl I .u^ llr.ehtnn. Mass. 
N itl'c P '" »*• '>res.t"K Hlant, Boston. 
Creameries in Vermont. 



"SCOTTIE" 
H. HOOPER 

Will < lean and pn-ss voui ..lotl.es so you 

will be satisfied. 1 1 costs no more 

and he is nearer lo "Aggfo 

LISCKAI "(KIT MSTHI 

Under Columbia Cafe 



E. B. DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 

Williams Mock, Amherst. Mass. 

Ottice Hours. q to It A. M.. 1 to to 5 F. M< 



Telephone 50— K 



4TKAM Ml TIWG 
UASFITT1M. 'INNING. 

F. W. DANCE & CO., Plumbers 

Specialty of Repairina. 

("Hl'Kt H WlMIOWS, MKMORIAL 
\\'|MI0W'\ I KAI» I.K.HTS. &C. 

sdiftonAve, AMHKKST. MASS, 



Tllli: TEWPWY .•AHI-OSw 
CtMUMfa* IT.»»li>K It- pHlrlnu 

Qalatunl tnyUm, R*s4 w.»rk. knwl Vf%m 

All woik carefully done. Work called for and 
delivered. Gents' owsoatv suits, pants an* 
coats Ladies' hne linen suits a 'n-oa'tv 
Teams will call every day at M. A.C. 

WW. KKXNKI.IN. Prop. 
Hear Nash Bl'k, Amherst. .Tel. No t4*-4 



Huntington Ave.. Exeter and Blagden Sts., Boston. Mass. 

Headquarters for College Men when in the city. 

AMOS H. WHIPPLE, *»ROP. 



Now is the time to be planning for 



FraternityGroups 

lUve them taken at 

MISS McCLELLAN'S STUDIO 

Northampton, Mass. 
44 State Street, * r 



FRESHMAN SHOW 

Wednesday evening, the freshman 
class presented its vaudeville show 
befort the student body in chapel. 
It was a varied affair, including ft 
minstrel show, several readings, a 
miniature play, and a boxing match. 
Taken as a whole, the exhibition was 
rather tame. Several selections, 
however, were exceedingly brilliant, 
and together with the good work of 
Jones, Worthley, Sutherland. War- 
ren and Wolfson, a fairly creditable 
performance was turned out. 

The freshman orchestra, which 
played numerous excellent pieces 
during the evening, opened the pro- 
grum with a selection from "Chris- 
tine." The second number of the 
program was named the "Rnzoo 
Minstrels." Fifteen blackened fresh- 
men with large red bow-ties, and 
with Warren as an interlocuter, ren- 
dered some fair selections, a few 
songs, and plenty ot wasted wit and 
laughter. The feature of this was 
entitled Hymn 1001, or "It's r long 
way from Northampton," rendered 
by Warren. 

A recital of the "Hobs Race" by 
Leiper followed, and it was presented 
in a very creditable manner. The 
class quartet, consisting of Worth- 
ley, Sawyer, Baker and Sutherland 
was especially good, and they cheer- 
fully responded to the repeated en- 
cores. Then followed one of the 
best numbers of the evening. This 
piece was entitled "U-fty at the 
bat." 



A long drawnout miniature sketch, 
which followed, was well acted, but 
the lack of action worked upon the 
nerves of a few spectators. But the 
last number, a boxing match between 
"HuBky" Sutherland and "Long 
Tom" Smith, wherein "Husky" deliv- 
ered the knockout blow, set the audi- 
ence in good humor again, and they 
all maintained strict neutrality in 
dispersing. Without a doubt, it was 
the best performance of its kind in 
recent years. 

THE ROISTER DOISTERS 

[Continued from page i] 

snappier production was never given 
by the club and the great applause 
together with the many curtain 
calls was more expressive than 
words of its worth. A dramatic 
critic from New York who chanced 
to be in the audience said that 
Andrews was positively the best 
amateur impersonater of women that 
he had ever seen, while Buckman's 
interpretation of an inebriate was 
equally worthy of commendation. 
Afterwards everybody danced until 
after midnight which proved a fitting 
climax to a truly wonderlul play. 

At Jamaica, N. Y., the next stop 
was made, where, under the auspices 
of the Men's club an even better 
presentation was given, if such a 
thing were possible. It being New 
Year's eve, both actors and audience 
threw themselves into the spirit of 
the play with such vim that a better 
execution could not be asked for. 
In fact it was so well received that 
afterwards the manager wai begged 
to make another trip in the spring. 
Afterwards the New Year was 
properly ushered in with danciug and 
other festivities during which time a 
most excelleut midnight supper was 
served. As Jamaica was the last 
stop on the trip, the party broke up, 
some men remaining in New York 
for a dav or two, while others scat- 
tered to their homes. 



TIIK 


CAST. 




Stuart Randolph. 
Richard Belden 
John Belden. 




Buckman '17 

>elkregg '1" 

Clark 'if. 


Irene Randolph. 
Emily Lad*w, 
Nora. 




Andrewa '16 

\Vilberfi7 

Patterson '1; 



R FOB YOUR DEM f\ 

V Beautiful College Pennants V 

I YALE and HARVARD, 
Each 9 in. x 14 in. 
PRINCETON, CORNELL, 
MICHIGAN, 

Each 7 in. x 11 in, 

4— Pennants, Size 12 x 30-4 

Any Leading Colleges of 

Your Selection 

All of our best quality, in their 
proper colors, with colored emblems. 

Either assortment, for limited l me, 
gent postpaid for 30 cents and five 
stamps to cover shipping costs. 

Write us for prices befnir- placing 
orders for felt novelties of all kinds. 

The (Jem City Novelty Co., 

401 BHtner Street, 
Dnyton. - - Ohio. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 5, 1915. 



BERKSHIRE COUNTY ALUMNI 

At a get-together banquet held in 
the New American, Pittsfied,on Dec. 
I*. the first Berkshire County Alumni 
1 -.sociation was formed and the fol- 
ding officers elected : President, T. 
Cooke, '01, of Pittsfield; vice- 

I sident, Dr. C. T. Leslie *01, of 
tstield; secretary and treasurer, 

II L. Barnes of Stockbridge. About 

II of the Alumni were present, as 
11 as representatives from each of 

he classes now in college and sub- 
. -.lime n. This association is one of 
the first to invite prospective students 
t<> its meetings and it is hoped that 
,,1 her alumni organizations will follow 
t lie lead of the Berkshire men. 

T F. Cooke '01 acted as toastmas- 
ter and made a few brief remarks, call- 
ing attention to the need of an active 
organization to bring together the M. 
A. C. men of Berkshire and to inter- 
est good high school men in coming 
to Aggie. He brought out the fact 
that for years M. A. C. has drawn 
most of her students from the eastern 
part of the state and that it is now 
up to the alumni to see that Berkshire 
is well represented in the coming 
years. 

H. M. Gore '13 told of the move- 
ment already started among the stu- 
dents to get high school men to think 

J. GINSBURG 

11 1-2 Amity Street *M 

Modern Sboe Repairing; 

A* AO'VJtCIMG 

75c Special Half Sole, Rubber 75c 

RBPAIHIKG 

Black. Tan, White Work Guaranteed. 

I •!*!«.• !■.«- 

K-jbber -Soles ...... ai.SO 

Kn'ilier Sole*, with Heels . . . SI.7A 

Sewed T5e 

•ft Shine* far SI Oil 



seriously of their state college and 
said that similar gatherings were be- 
ing held all over the state for that 
one purpose— to talk Aggie. While 
bis particular interest was in getting 
more athletes to come to the college, 
he could not offer any inducements 
to prospective students other than the 
chance to mix in with one of the most 
democratic student bodies of any in- 
stitution in the east. The primary 
object of the college is to train men, 
aud in order to do this she must 
get the ''est of the high school 
material to work on. To further this 
end it is proposed to establish M. A. 
C. chilis in the different schools of 
the state, a plan which has had con- 
siderable success at Monson academy. 

G. K. O'Hearn '04 of Pittsfield, a 
former captain of football, gave a few 
words of encouragement to the pros- 
pective students aud urged the fel- 
lows already in college to co-operate 
with the alumni in looking for new 
men. He also advocated greater 
leeway to be given in the matter of 
employment for men who represent 
the college in athletics. This, he 
said, would keep for M. A. C. a good 
many needy students who would 
otherwise be lost to rival institutions. 

H. G. Mattoou '16 of Pittsfield 
spoke for the undergraduates and 
pledged their hearty co-operation in 
the work of the newly formed alumai 
association. 



01 LAVAL 

BUTTER 

ln-.».| os uxinl 

ttt 1 in- iri-»-« • t 

ISI4 MfflONHL DAIRY SHOW 



BUTTER made from cream sepa- 
rated by Ue Laval Separators 
made the usual clean sweep of 
all highest awards at the great Na- 
tional Dairy Show held in Chicago 
last October, as it has always done at 
every convention of the National 
I ittermakers Association or a Dairy 
•Vow since the beginning of these 
important annual contests in 189a. 

1 lie Sweepstakes and Gold Medal 
•• ills went to De Laval made batter 
l >e following classes; 

Whole Mil Creamery Butter 
Gathered Cream Creamery Butter 

(Nearly all De Laval) 

Farm Dalit Bullet 

E DE LAVAL SEPARATOR CO. 



Broadway 

KWYORK 



•a E. Madison St. 

CHICAGO 



'*5?fc* 



adjourned it 
ted to'fiiVe jfa aflkwtt form a 

HHNrMr 

hold meetings abtiu t 

The following were prsaent : R. R. 
Coleman *U«i, T. F. Cooke '01, C. T. 
Leslie '01, G. E. O'Hearn "04, G. N. 
Willis '05, H. L. Barnes '05, H. M. 
Gore *13, Christie and Hadtteld *14, 
Cande '15, Mattoon '10, Smith '17, 
A. Allen '18, G. Custle '19, N. Lin- 
coln "20 and W. Austin '21. 




Che Pheasant 

Smlts St., Bmberst 

Breakfast, Luncheon, 
Afternoon Tea. 

Dinner if arranged for. 
Telephone 470 

Rooms for Transients. 

theTeachers Exchange 

Of Bitten lao Boyltton St. 

Recommends Teachers, Tutors and Schools 



An Especially iiood ComnbtHMi Proposition 
Cash lot test ordeis — Article widely Advertised— 

Cuts ildwn expanse in (hum 1 1 1.1 n i-,-- Addresi 
KNi.iNK.tuiM. Si I'll \ Co,, 1138 N 'Jth Street, 
Philadelphia. I';i 



* They're not short-lived 

The Jerseys 

In 1913 eighteen }er«ey 
cows were officially tested 
which averaged Yi years 

:i id 7 months ol as-'. Their 
average milk production 
was8f:7 pounds. Average 
butter 1 t, 387 pounds. One 
of th.' e cows was over 18 
years old, 
Ijongtvlty. Constitution c-t Fronomic 
Production ai ^' Jersey cjai irterlmto. 

TBE AMERICAN JrHSKY CATTLE CLUB 
S24 W. 2M hi.. EM York City 





Am.-ri.ia FbbbUib ttm Co.. Mf«. 

•AbM. ( 'bmbh A F«a*, SbKmj 
Nv HcwMbtfc Si., 



ALUMNI NOTES 

MASSACHUSETTS AOBICULTUBAL 00*> 

LKOK CLt'll OK NEW YOKE 1914-15. 

OENEBAL ORDER NO. 1. 

The twenty-eighth annual reunion 
and banquet will take place at the 
Hotel Martinique, Broadway and 
Thirty-second street, Saturday eve- 
ning, Feb. 27, 1915. Ticket'-., five 
dollars. Notices to graduate and 
non-graduate alumni, and to present 
and former members of the boards 
of government and instruction will 
be sent the latter part of January. 
Kindly watch these columns for fur- 
there informative general orders. 

John A. Cutting, M.D. *82, Sec'y. 
266 West 77th street, N. Y. 
Dec. 19th, 1914. 



SUMMER SCHOOL BANQUET 

The reunion of the 1914 Summer 
school students of Massachusetts 
Agricultural college was held in 
W i verba nk Court , Cambridge, Jan 2 . 
A delicious banquet was enjoyed by 
about 30 members of the class, after 
which the remainder of the evening 
was agreeably spent In singing, 
dancing, renewing acquaintanceships 
and looking at the many pictures 
taken at Amherst. The faculty was 
represented by Professor Maynard 
and Ernst Hermann. 




Do You Raise 300 Bushels of Potatoes per Acre? 

HREE hundred bushels per acre is 
not an unusual yiclu by any means, 
but did you get it this year ? 
€9U you were planning to raise 300 
bushels of potatoes to the acre how 
%A far apart would you space your rows? 
How far apart would you drop the seed pieces in 
the row? 

flHow much fertilizer would vou use to grow 700 
bushels of potatoes per acre? How would you 
apply it ? 

^Are you sure that your seed potatoes are true to 
name and true to type ? 

tJWhat are you doing to prevent *'scab," in J i arly 
and late blight ? 

•JDid you have a short crop of potatoes because <<f 
dry weather? Have you decided how >ou will 
overcome this trouble in the future ? 

fjAH these practical poiais, mid miny mure, are lolly cnvcrrJ mii our 
new book 

"Potatoes: A Money Crop" 

which will be tent Ire* to every poiaio grower whu request* ■ copy, and 

mentions ibis paper, 

•JThin book is written Hy a man who himself has had yean of experience a« 

a potato grower, and who he* made a careful *tsd> of the hi-M methods of 

other growers. 

€Jlf you read this hook you will keep it for future reference il it a "worth 

while" public ii urn 

The Coe-Mortimer Company 

51 CHAMBERS STREET, NEW YORK CITY 




M 



I 





I 



8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 5, iqi.S- 



JOIN THE BUNCH AT 



EPSTEIN'S TAILORING PARLORS 

Wiw located <>ver post oihce. Up <>"e IHgbt 

Pressing and Cleaning a Specialty 

I .iljeral Ticktl Syst. KB l el - #- M 

1*. MIBXTKA. 

SHOE STORE 

Shoes Repaired by Machinery 

SHOE SHINE 

1 ipeu Sunday from 7-12. On your way to I'. * >. 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College fountain pens 



Oilers courses of instruction in twenty-seventeachmj' 
departments, which embrace the study ol 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



Moore's Swan- 

Waterman's 

Thirty-six dozen pens to select from. 

OUR RULE 



The Highland Hotel 

(oriii-r ol llillman ami BaMM Stiyeti, three 
blocks from the fnion Depot, is » modern iiob- 
telry run on the European Plan. It is just a step 
from Main .-street, away liom the noise and <IU« 

and yet in the center of the business district. 

It* 100:11* are well famished M>d comfortable, 

haVinil a telephone and li.it and old running 
water 111 every room. HrJCW *l and up; rooms 
with hath (single) •l-SO and up. 

It, excellent cuisine ani *ell ventilate.l dlfltng 
roomoukM a meal a peasant n.emory-every 
thin* of the highest quality, well cooked and 
,eiv?d in the best possible manner, 

>tav at the Highland Hotel once and \..n Wl!l 
anticipate itayln* there again. Mnsk every 



Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 

Agricultural Chemistry 



evening 



D. H. SIEVERS, 



HlK>ll»<l<l Hotel. 



>oi iiiKli' l-l. Mmk>. 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

1'oultry Husbandry 

Economic Entomology 

Microbiology 

Plant Physiology and Pathology 

Agricultural Education 

Rural Social Science 

For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



"Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded." 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



STiKITFIUIIlIE 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New Kn 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

v >" fKNSES ^^*~» 



Associate Alumni, 

Joint Committee on InterooUegiate AUihtUCS, 

M. A. C. Athletic Fie'd Association. 

The College Senate, 
Football Association. 
Baseball Association, 
Track Association, 

Hockej Association, 





CARPET ROOMS 

E. I). MARSH ESTATE 

COX SONS 

— AND — 

VINING 

7»-74 Madison Avenue. New York 

CAPS AND GOWNS 

liesl Materials and Workmanship 

WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

27 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



Nineteen Hundred Sixteen Index, 
M. A. C. Christian Association. 
II. A. C. Catholic Club. 
Fraternity Conference . 
M1.1 kbridge Club, 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 

C. A. Peters, Secretary 

Philip H. Smith, Secretary 

t . S. Hicks, 'Treasurer 

E. Towne, President 

.1. A. Price, Manager 

S. Prouly, Manager 

E. F. Clark, Manager 
Jt^^rapcr. Manager 

'jflhop, Manager 

. A. Anderson, Manager 

II. M . Rogers, Manager 

L. K. Fielding, Manager 

H. H- White, President 

.1. E. Harper, President 

F. \V. Buell, President 
p. F. Whitmore, President 



I.- I . 111 •»" • '• IX"- 

Stkimikn Lank Folobh 

MANCKAOTUHINO JKWML.KR 

ISO BROADWAY, NKW YOKK 

GSATB AM) CX>1*UBQB 

IMNS AM) tEt2*S8 ■* 




RAHAR'S INN 

Northampton, Ma*s«chusetu 



rwi 



HLOCKS FROM THE DEPOT 



jjhe hotel where there is comfort (with 
** out extravagance.) Mof popular 
than ever. 

Special Luncheon 1 2— X P.M. 

PRIVATE DINING ROOMS 

A la Carte Service 
Prom 6 30 to II P- M. 



there are S*VM Good RmMM«*1 n""'»>«1<» 
I my you 1 



COAL 

or 

C. B. ELDER 



Stationery, Newspapers, 
Magazines and Col- 
lege Supplies 



The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

Fiom Amherst via Northampton, 
through the Hatrklds, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Mt., alongside the 
famous Bloody Brook battle ground 
to Old Deerfield, thence to Green- 
field, Turners Falls and across the 
tins" to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 

50 Mile* of Trackage riodern 
Equipment - Train Dispatch- 
tag System-Freight and Ex- 
press Service over entire line 



CARS 



Leave AQQIE COLLEGE lor HOL- 
YOKE at 1 5 mta. past the how. 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST for AOQIE COL- 
LEQE at 7 and #7 mln. past the hour. 

Special Car* a« 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer. 



AMHERST & SUNDULMO ST. fit CO 



Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
Company 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers i 

JNIFORMS 

For college and military M hools, and hart won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

JACOB REED'S SONS, 



Makers of **Gold Medal Uniform*. 



Ctottd only from i A. M. to 4 * *• 1494-1426 ChettfiUt St 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



Kor a Daily and Sunday Newspaper 
Yea should Read 

THIS 

Springfield Republican 

While you are at collef e In Amherst. 

It hiuall of TlwM.A^C.Wews 

XI,,. B*»t Spurting News 

Full Orwrwl Jfww* 

A -.1 r..i.K Editorial l"=«u«- 

I ., 1. . - - 1 1 nu restores 

It la » R*ai H*wap«|Mi* 

Daily* 3 cents ; 70 cents a month 
a quarter. 
Sunday, S cents; 50 cents a quarte 

Subscribe by mail or through lb* Amherst 





AGRICULTURAL 



Vol. XXV. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, January 12, 1915. 



No. 15 



RIFLE TEAM SCHEDULE 

STARTS THIS WEEK 



Eleven Matches to be Contested in 

Determining the Winner in 

Class A Division. 

Tor some time practice on the 
indoor rifle range has been open to 
all who wish to try for a position on 
the team, and in this manner Captain 
Lane has been getting a line on the 
new material. In fact some excllent 
material has been brought to light 
by the new interclass rifle con- 
tests ; and with a nucleus of .six vet- 
erans, the prospects for a champion- 
ship team are very bright, 

Although the indoor rifle shooting 
season of 1914 was productive of 
surprises in all of the different in- 
door leagues held under the auspices 
>>f the National Rifle Association of 
America, there was none in which 
records were smashed so recklessly or 
in which the results were more sur- 
prising than in the intercollegiate 
matches. A new departure was 
made for the first time in classifying 
the entries according to the previous 
records of the teams as far as was 
obtainable. As there were thirty- 

(Continued on page ;l 



BUDGET FOR COMING YEAR 

OVER HALF A MILLION 



Soo 
3.000 



20000 

85,000 

50,000 
2,000 



800 
3,000 



6,000 6,000 



500 



500 



SPRINGFIELD GAME 

To UK Platei* n» Spnmonici.n 

The hockey game scheduled on the 

1 Minpus with Springfield Y. M.C. A. 

college for Jan. 13 is to be played at 

the Springfield rink, due to the poor 

condition of the ice on the farsity 

rink. The game scheduled with 

Springfield for Jan. 30 there, will 

consequently become a home game 

ind will be played on the campus. 

Hie game will be played at 3-15 on 

Wednesday afternoon. The game 

-hould be fairly easy for M. A. C. 

after a series of rather strenuous 

opponents. 

M. I. T. is expected to furnish a 
itifT battle for the Aggie seven at 
I Matt rink, Amherst on Saturday, 
KB, Hi The game will be called at 
<>0 p. x. sharp, M. I. T, held 
Harvard to a $-t score early in the 
■ -on at tin Boston Arena, and have 
■proved since that time. The 
nt game with M. I. T. in 1918 
resulted in a 4-1 victory forM. A. C. 
udergraduate students will be ad- 
mitted on student tickets which may 
s procured at the Physical Director's 
Mice. Regular admission 50 cents, 
mlmrst college students 25 cents. 



In Statement to State Secretary, Pres- 
ident Butterfield Seeks Money for 
Many Necessary Improvements. 

President Butterfield in accord- 
ance with a request from Secretary 
F. 3. Donahue has filed a statement 
at the state house of the appropria- 
tions asked for by the college for 
1915, and also of the special appro- 
priations not included under the act 
of 1910. The list is as follows ; 

Coming Last 
year. year. 

General administration, $31,000 $30,000 

Equipment, maintenance, 90,000 85,000 

Improvements, 10.000 8,000 

Agricultural investigations 
and experiments, 25.000 

Theoretical and practical 

instruction, 00,000 

Short courses and exten- 
sion work, 50.000 

Graduate school, 2.000 

Land, 5. 000 

Travel ami other trusts*** 
expenses. 

Printing trustees* report, 

Inspection of commercial 
feedstuff*, 

Costs of milk and cream 
tests in prosecution, 

Total, *3 , 3»3<»*»9 2 .3 00 

The following special appropria- 
tions were also stated : Addition to 
power plant, $30,000; addition to 
rural engineering shops, for roads, 
walks, changes in South college, and 
cold storage plant at dining hall, 
$10.000 ; student dormitory, $40,000 ; 
laboratory for microbiology, $07,500 ; 
erecting and equipping laboratory 
for agriculture, $122,500; total, 
$270,000. 

President Butterfleld'a reasons are 
in part as follows: The present 
power plant with its four boilers of 
150 horsepower each is able to fur- 
nish steam for approximately 55,000 
feet of radiation, The new agricul- 
tural building which will be ready 
for occupancy in September will 
increase the present demand on the 
beating plant by about one-fourth ; 
thus a new boiler is an absolute 
necessity If the new building is to be 
utilized. Estimates by Stone & 
Webster Co. call for $33,100, but it 
is believed that changes can be made 
for $30,000 by using college labor. 

The new department of rural engi- 
neering requires shop facilities and a 
beginning will be made by building 
one-half of one unit of the proposed 
shops, to be finished next year. 
[Csatlsssd — pest |1 



YALE CAPTURES HOCKEY 

GAME BY WIDE MARGIN 

Score of 5-2 Accounted for by Lack of 

Team Work and Unfamiliarity with 

Rink. Individual Work Good. 



GEORGE FRANKLIN MILLS 

MEMORIAL SERVICE HELD 



Tributes Paid to Memory of Dean 

Emeritus Who was a Former 

Treasurer and Professor. 



Fast, clean playing marked the 
hockey game with Yale on Wednes- 
day at the New Haven rink in which 
the Eli team won 5-2. Lack of 
effective team work by the Aggie 
men was responsible for the defeat to 
a large extent. Yale had things their 
own way during the middle part of 
the game while the Massachusetts 
meu showed up well at the beginning 
and the end of the game. 

Play started with a rush and with- 
in two minutes Fernald shot a pretty 
goal which was not allowed by the 
referee who claimed it was a forward 
pass. Dickey of Yale then got the 
puck by Butterick for the first score. 
Half a minute later Ross skated the 
length of the rink and shot a goal that 
tied the score. Dickey, and S w e en e y , 
the Yale captain, each shot a goal 
before the end of the half. Play was 
mostly at the M. A. C. end of the 
rink and Butterick was hard at work 
stopping the shots. 

The shadow on the puck seemed to 
trouble the Aggie team and any at- 
tempt at team work failed as the 
passes were missed. Dribbling was 
also missing to any degree by any of 
the forward line due to the same 
trouble. At the end of the first half 
the score was Yale 3, M. A. C. 1. 

Ynle opened the second half with 
some fine hockey and shot two gonls 
within the first five minutes. The 
Aggie team then pulled together and 
for the last fifteen minutes of the half 
play centered around the Yale cage. 
The Yale defense was strong, how- 
ever, and none of the shots were 
effective until the close of the game 
when Johnson came out of a scrim- 
mage and shot the second Aggie goal 
for the last score of the game. 

A crowd of over a thousand were 
at the Arena and were pleased with 
the exhibition of good hockey put up 
by both teams. Although Yale was 
never in danger after the first half 
the game was interesting throughout. 
A good sized number of Aggie rooters 
were present and were very eager to 
see the Massachusetts boys win. 
The New Haven press spoke well of 
the Aggie team and placed the losing 
of the game to the fact that the M. 
A. C. men wore without the services 



Wednesday Assembly was devoted 
to a memorial service in honor of 
George Franklin Mills, former dean 
emeritus of the college, who died 
last autumn. Different phases of 
Dean Mills' versatile life were com- 
memorated by l>r. Franklin IT 
Carter, former president of Wil- 
liams College, Howard E. Knight, 
M. A. C. '0i, who wrote the college 
song, Hon Charles A. Gleason of 
Springfield, vice-president of the 
board of trustees, and Dr. Joseph B. 
Tiudsey, M. A. C. 188$. Kev. John 
F. Nichols opened the service with a 
very liUiug prayer and President 
Butterfield brought the memorial to 
a close by gj" ; "" ° '" '" f outline of 
De 




t Cont i nued on page 3 ) 



in part : 

"Fifty-four years ago last Septem- 
ber, I made the acquaintance of 
George Mills. 1 entered Williams 
from Yale and while making the 
journey to Williarastown on horse- 
back, I met a man who gave me a 
letter of introduction to 'a friend at 
Williams.' That friend was no other 
person than George Mills and from 
that time Mills and I became the 
Iwst of friends. He received his col- 
lege preparation in Williston Semin- 
ary where he made a name for him- 
self as a hard and diligent worker. 
His life at Williams may best be 
gummed up by quoting the records 
of the class secretary who wrote, 
'No man in class took as many hon- 
ors In the many activities of a college 
career as George Franklin Mills." 

He was a man of the strictest hon- 
esty and of the most genuine man- 
hood. He was always superbly loyal 
to every person and every worthy 
cause. When he graduated from 
college, all his classmates looked 
upon him as a man destined for the 
big things in life. 

His father's school offered him a 
calling and his loyalty to his father 
prompted him to accept. During 
the seventies and eighties he sent 
many well-trained men to Williams. 
His great and open heart and steadi- 
ness of manhood readily won the 
admiration of the thinking boys^wilh 
whom he came In contact. 








The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan, 12, 1915. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 12, 191 5. 






• All of his early life was spent Id 
small villages where lirst developed 
his love of God and kindness to his 
fellow men. He believed that Christ 
was the only true example, and he 
was ever loyal to his belief. 

When his work in Williamstown 
drew to a close, he received a call to 
M. A. C. and from this time his life 
became more hopeful for he felt that 
he would then be able to do the most 
good to men. In fact, it was his 
second springtime. Here he lost 
physical strength but rapidly gained 
in spiritual power. He was the chief 
pillar in his church and would have 
played a prominent part in public 
activities but for his confining duties 
in the college. 

His failing strength was shattered 
by the death of his beloved wife who 
was ever his companion in his labors 
and ideals. 1 look upon him an a 
true saint, for as his health declined 
steadily, his wonderful mind stood 
out more and more until the end 
came, his thoughts were with God, 
who gave them to him. His life was 
rich and impressive, free from pre- 
tense or sham, an inspiration for 
hope and for the stability of this 
institution. Dean Mills did not 
amass a fortuue but toiled for the 
poor; he did not stalk across the 
stage of publicity but had hosts of 
friends who revere and honor his 

wonderful life." 

earlier of 




o- 

fessor Mills* career is In my mind 
that period of 20 years which he 
devoted to teaching. At that time, 
Knglish was the most important sub- 
ject and came fust before sis other 
subjects. Four hours a week was 
devoted to this subject for the full 
four years, and Professor Mills tad 
charge of the course. Junior and 
senior years the men came in per- 
sonal contact with him. It was not 
so much for the Knglish itself that I 
valued the course, but from contact 
with the limn himself, a legion of 
other things were learned. He 
taught sound and practical scholar- 
ship and believed in getting 'to the 
bottom of things." Thoroughness 
was ever his watchword. The mere 
being in coutact with his wonderful 
personality and character sufficed to 
make his course a profitable one. He 
had that wonderful power of impart- 
ing his own knowledge to others. It 
is one thing to know your subject, 
another to give it to others, and still 
another to live up to one's teaching. 
Dean Mills had all of these import- 
ant assets and through them gained 
the admiration of all his pupils. 
Had ht taken up Poultry Husbandry 
he would have been an inspiration to 
his scholars, with his deep insight into 

life. 

There was no advance study or 
travel in his life, out his career was 
confined to a few small towns. Yet, 
he has that broad mind and noble 



character which has developed from 
his firm love of God " 

Mr. Gleason spoke of "George F. 
Mills as treasurer of the college" and 
said in part : 

"It is fitting to pause and give 
respect to Denn Mills for his ability 
and for his official life. For 1 5 years 
he worked as treasurer and as I was 
auditor, I had the chance to see the 
faithfulness and thoroughness of 
his work. He was not a trained 
accountant and the work of treasurer 
and instructor were combined. He 
worked without any help for many 
years and his days of toil were long. 
Finally his labors were lightened 
when he was granted an assistant. 
His book-keeping was simple and 
easily followed and his work was 
conscientious to the last degree. 

Even while treasurer his council 
was sought by students who wanted 
his ideas on personal matters about 
the college course. He was thor- 
oughly interested in his work and 
acquitted himself nobly. His work 
was a credit to the college, for his 
courteous treatment to all gave him 
the admiration and respect of his 
associates. He was a born gentle- 
man in whom character was the 
mainspring of life. There was uo 
winter in his career for the spring of 
love was always in evidence. The 
church, college and community felt 
the power of his persoual life which 
was lasting in its effect. Many times 
have I heard him speak on this plat- 
form aud his quiet influence will con- 
tinue to speak for many years to 

come." 

Dr. Liudsey, in speaking of "Dean 
Mills as a member of the faculty" 

said : 

"Dean Mills came to the college 
in 1**9 as an instructor in Knglish. 
He was then . r >0 years old. The next 
year he was made Professor of Kng- 
lish and his contemporaries promptly 
declared that he was a great addition 
to the teaching force which then was 
composed of nine members. When 
he died, there were 41 professors 
and 21 assistants connected with the 
college, and it was through this great 
period of growth that Deau Mills 
worked. 

He was an absolutely square man 
without any deception. He had not 
a magnetic personality but his kind- 
ness and cheerfulness, which drew 
you to him, made him your lasting 
friend. He was loyal to his fellow- 
workers and faithful to President 
Goodell, who sought his counsel 
repeatedly. Much to the latter** joy 
Dean Mills was made treasurer in 
1892 and the president said, 'I have 
in Mills a right hand man, reliable at 
all times.' He did two men's work 
for many years and was efficient and 
oarefnl in his dotles. In 1907, he 
was made Dean and head of the Hu- 
manities. He was then 68 years 
old. His spirit was willing but the 
flesh was weak. Then a long period 
of illness came upon him which 
retarded his capabilities materially. 



He alwavs stood for high scholar- | Macdonald. Referees- Fly nn of New 
ship, obedience and thoroughness of »™J«%^£ "£ ^ 
work. He himself was a Phi Beta 
Kappa man. He was always the 
friend and adviser of the students 
and succeeded in lifting the obstin- 



ate to a higher plane of living. He 
clung tenaciously to life when health 
failed him and tried to do his duty. 
He was a man of high ideals and 
character who was not a great man, 
as the world measures one, but an 
ideal man. In the passing of Dean 
Mills, the faculty loses a fine type of 
gentleman, a great scholar and a 
loving, inspiring man." 

President Butterfield gave a brief 
sketch of Dean Mills' life in "A 
Closing Word," and said in part : 

"If Dean Mills had lived a year 
longer he would have rounded out 85 
years of faithful service to the college. 
He was essentially a teacher of men 
and his methods were neither per- 
functory nor mechanical but natural 
in their application. As treasurer, he 
gave many tedious hours to his duties 
and yet seemed inspired with his 
work. As dean, he had no prede- 
cessor aud had to outline his own 
work. He was obedieut to his con- 
science, a lover of men, and a teach- 
er because he loved men. He was 
not content to deal with the mass but 
liked to be in coutact with the per- 
sonal. In his life there was a dis- 
tinct note of chivalry. He bore a 
financial burden secretly which was 
not brought, on by himself. Dean 
Mills was patient in all of his months 
of illness, and remarkably true to his 
faith in God. He was a Christian 
gentleman and no greater tribute can 
be paid to any man. 

Personally. 1 will say that he was 
an ideal colleague, a constant inspira- 
tion for resolves of high living. He 
has been taken from us in the autumn 
when the leaves, their labors ovei , 
have fallen to earth. We cannot 
cease to feel the force of hiB great 
life which will be with us to the end." 



THE YALE GAME 

[Continued from page i] 



of a coach and were lacking in the 
finishing points of following the puck. 
Clean playing was very much in 
evidence and no penalties or warn- 
ings weie given to the players by the 
referees. 

The line-up and summary I 
vAlb. **• A - c * 

York, k 8. Butterick 

Herron, p P. Archibald 

Bierworth, cp cp, Ross 

Dickey, c c, Chisholm 

Sweeney, r r, Johnson 

Macdonald.rw rw, FernakJ 

Murray, Iw lw, Wooley 

FIRST HALF. 

Yale Dickey 

Aggie Ross 

Yale Dickey 

Yale Sweeney 

S«CONI> HALF, 

M orray 

Sweeney 

Johnson 



3 = 14 
4:40 
19:13 

Score— Yale 5, Aggie 1, Substitutions 
—Sanderson for Fernald, Wilson for 



Yale 
Yale 
Aggie 



Umpires-Burgess for Yale and Lowry 
for Aggie. Time of halves— 20 minutes. 
Stops— York 10, Butterick 18. 

The Game with Columbia 
Aggie came back in great form 
after their first game at the New 
Haven arena and defeated Columbia 
easilv bv the score of 5-0 on Thurs- 
day night. The M. A- C. team was 
always on top and although they only 
secured one goal in the first half, 
four more were secured in the second 
period. Columbia may have been 
troubled by the lights as were the 
Massachusetts men on the night 
before, but they were lacking in the 
essentials of the game. One New 
Haven paper said of the game "every 
man on the team (M. A. C.) played 
a bang-up good game of hockey and 
the mauner in which they cairied the 
puck down through the entire Colum- 
bia defense was more or less of a 
revelation." Another paper put it, 
"every one of the Massachusetts 
lads knows hockey and is in fine con- 
dition to play the game, their ability 
to skate fast from start to finish and 
battle all the while is going to make 
trouble for lots of teams." It is safe 
to say that if the same form had been 
shown in the Yale game, as against 
Columbia it would have been a very 
close contest. 

A good sized crowd was present at 
the game as the Aggie team has a 
good name in New Haven for their 
hockey playing. Play started off 
with a rush aud was rougher than in 
the game the night before. The 
puck soon stayed down about the 
Columbia cage and scoring seemed 
imminent several times. It was not 
until the middle of the first half that 
Fernald took the puck on a pass from 
Johnson and shot a goal. This was 
the only score of the half. 

After the intermission the team 
came back with better scoring power. 
Chisholm shot the first goal in this 
half after some pretty passing by the 
forwards. Wooley added mother 
within the iist eight minutes after 
bringing the pock the length of the 
rink. Toward the close of the game 
Archibald made the fourth score and 
Johnson got his customary last min- 
ute score with four seconds to spare, 
play was entirely in the Columbia 
end of the rink in this period and 
the Aggie defense players were gen- 
erally in the middle of the rink 
waiting for a chance snot. 

The speed oi fee entire forward 
lint was extremely prominent and 
the team work and passing of the 
men was the best done to far this 
year. Johnson was a whirlwind on 
his skates and his rushing and pass- 
ing of the puck were instrumental in 
most of the scores. The defense 
had little trouble in stopping the occa- 
sional rushes of the Columbia men 
who were for most part on the defen- 
sive. Butterick kept Us cage free of 
the puck and had an easy evening of 
it waiting for some shots to stop. 



3 55 

4:25 
9:40 
14 :o6 



The score and summary : 

COLUMBIA. M. A. C. 

Butler, rw rw, Fernald 

Cleary, lw lw, Woolley 

Webb, r r, Johnson 

Reynolds, cp cp, Archibald 

Johnson, p P, Ross 

Miller, c c, Chisholm 

Meyer, g g, Buttrick 

Score — Aggies, 5, Columbia o. Goals 
for Aggies— Fernald 10:14; Chisholm, 
4 : 20 ; Woolley, 8 149 ; Archibald, 18 : 30 ; 
Johnson, 19:56. Penalties— Bartow, 
Woolley, two minutes apiece; Butler, 
three minutes Substitution — Bartow 
for Johnson. Stops— Buttrick 7, Meyer 
17. Referee — Fynan. Umpire, Mc- 
Kinnon. 

West Point Defeated 



captain of the Army team was hard 
at work all the time and made many 
good stops. The absence of aid from 
his defense men was responsible for 
the large score. The whole Aggie 
team played well,Johnsou audWooley, 
particularly, showing considerable 
speed and good playing at all times. 
The summary and score follow : 

ARMY. M. A, C. 



Strong, g 
Ford, p 
Brundred, ch 
Mangan, r 
McLean, c 
Redfield, r w 
Meneeley, Iw 



g, Butterick 

p, Archibald 

cp, Ross 

r, Johnson 

c, Chisholm 

rw, Fernald 

Iw, Wooley 



Score— M. A. C. 7, Army 1. Referee- 
Draper, M. A. C. Umpire— Lieut Pur- 
gin, W. P. Timer— Clough. M. A. C. 

phhv <y»r nst Time of halves- 20 and 15 minutes. 

Aggie had an easy game againBi | SubslUules _ Smiln for Redfield, Durfee 

for McLean, House for Durfee. Sander- 
son for Fernald, Goals — Ross 2:45, 
Fernald 4: 45, Johnson 4:50, Johnson 

Archibald 17 : 10, 



DR. R. C. 

Dentist 
NASH'S BLOCK 

Evenings bv Appointment. 



LAHHOV1TS5 

Tailor and I'kksskk. 

dents' Furnishings -Dress Suits to 

Rent- Drill Oloves and Collars 

Ticket SYSTRM. 
11 a ,v.si. Phone 



the Army at West Point on Saturday 
in hockey and defeated the cadets by 
the score of 7-1 . 

The Army was playing its first 
game and it waB apparent in their 
lack of team work and their ignorance 
of the fine points of the game. The 
ice was rough and slowed up the 
game considerably. The Massachu- 
setts men could score at will but after 
securing five goals in the first ten 
minutes the play slowed down and the 
M. A. C. team waB content with two 
more goals, one of them coming in 
the second half. The Army team 
secured its only goal shortly before 
time was called in the first half 
Meneeley shooting the puck into the 
cage from a scrimmage in front of the 
goal. The game was clean through- 
out and, although, through lack of 
practice, the West Point team can not 
be taken as a fair example, the Aggie 
team showed lots of team work and 
played a fast game until the lead was 
held by a good margin. Of the four 
games played last week the Massa- 
chusetts men won two and scored 
fourteen points to their opponents 
nine. 

Ross started the scoring in the 
West Point game shortly after play 
had Btarted. Carrying the puck down 
the rink through the entire defence he 
shot a goal in less than three minutes. 
Two minutes later Fernald scored on 
a pass in front of the net. Five 
seconds later Johnson came down 
from the face off and scored the third 
goal and followed it a few minutes 
later with another. Chisholm took 
his turn on scoring in the next minute 
carrying the puck from the center of 
the rink for a pretty shot for goal. 
Toward the elose of the period Cap- 
tain Archibald carried the puck op 
the ice cleverly and rosde the last 
score for Aggie in this half. Shortly 
after came the only West Point score, 
shot by Meneeley. 

The second half was uneventful, 
and was shortened from twenty min- 
utes to fifteen. Wooley was not to 
be outdone by bis team mates and 
shot his goal after ten minutes of play 
in this half. Butterick was the only 
man on the team not to score and he 
bad an easv afternoon as only a few 
stray shots came his way, Strong, 
on the other hand, goal keeper and 



9 : 00, Chisholm 9:50, 
Meenely 18 : oo, Wooley 10 : 40. 

THE ROISTER DOISTERS 

The fifth performance of "Her 
Husband's Wife" was giveu by the 
Roister Doisters in Red Men's hall, 
Cbicopee Falls on Saturday evening, 
under the auspices of the Camp-fire 
Girls* Fifteen men made the trip 
including the orchestra and the play 
went off exceedingly well barring a 
few mishaps aad inconvenieuces. 
As usual Andrews, Clark and Huck- 
111:111 were the stars of the evening 
and each drew round after round of 
applause from the enthusiastic audi- 
ence, Andrews for his inimitable 
impersonation of Irene Randolph, 
the adoring wife who is afraid she 
is going to die, Clark for his spark- 
ling dialogue and good intentions 
as bluff old Uncle John, and Buckiuan 
for his well enacted scene as 
Stuart Randolph, the loving husband. 
Selkregg created a sensation by fall- 
ing over backwards in a chair, but 
everything came out all right and 
everybody pronounced the play to be 
the best ever. Dancing was enjoyed 
liv all till 11-30, music being fur- 
nished by the I ndependent orchestra. 



Let us help you to cut down your Prom expenses 

We can sell you 

A Full Dress Suit 

That is absolutely correct and that we fully guarantee 

For Thirty Dollars 

Made by Hart Schafl'ner & Marx. 



We have all the accessories for full dress wear 

Gloves, $1.50 

Opera Hats, $5.00 

Scarfs, 50c to $3.00 

Shirts, $1.50 to $2.00 

Vests, $2.50 to $5.00 

Overcoats, $15 to $22 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



Mas*a« iusktts Aoricultobal I ol.- 

L.ROK Cum of New York 

Gbwekal Orhkk No. 2. 

l/cvi Stockbnuge, if he were living 
would say i 

"Come boys, times nn- hard and all 
are distressed or bothered. What 
care we the Hampshire valley and 
mountains are holding and guarding 
the M. A. C. — the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts aud the Federal gov- 
ernment are very much alive. So get 
together at the Hotel Martinque, Feb. 
S7. Cutter was a very small and 
insignificant freshman in the Fall of 
187H. Now he is a bald-headed man 
over fifty years of age. Let him bear 
from yon and when yon foregather in 
honor of the institution which we old 
men labored for, inspiration will come 
as a solution of your daily anxieties." 
Address. 

J. A. Cum it, *m t 266 West 77th, 
New York City. 

Eds. Notes; — The hockey team 
defeated Columbia and West 
Point easily which might also be an 
inspiration. 



! 

Twenty-five cents will be put in a box for the 
NEW ATHLETIC FIELD every time you 
buy shoes at our store costing $3.50 or over. 

VERY LATEST STYLES. 

Shoes for the Drill- $2.50 to $5.00 



Page's 



hoe Store 



school ana College Photographers 




LOCALLY: 5* Center St, 



Main Orrics; 

1 546- 1548 Broadway, 

New York City 



Northampton, Mass., 

and South Hadley, Mass. 

These Studios offer the best skilled 
artists and most complete 

equipment obtainable 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



•DEALERS IN- 



Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 12, 1915- 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan, ia, 191 5. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS 
FRANK W. BUELI. *15. Editor-in-Chief 

TYLER S. ROGERS 'i6. Managing Editor 
HENRY H. WHITE '15. Assistant Edit 

JAMES A. PRICE '15. 
E. SUMNER DRAPER '15, 
THOS.L, HARROCKS'i6, Department Editor 
ALFRED A. GIOIOSA '|6. Campus Editor 
FRANK J. SCHEUFELE, Alumni Editor 
MILFORD R. LAWRENCE '17, 

Associate Editor 
RICHARD W. SMITH '17, Associate Editor 



Athletic Editor 
Athletic Editor 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

MAURICE J. CLOUGH'15. Business Manager 
CHAS A. HUNTINGTON. JR. »i6. 

Assistant Business Manager 
W. RICHARD SEARS '15. Advertising Man'g'r 
LESTER E. FIELDING '16. Ass't Adv. Mgr. 
BIRGER R. ROSEQUIST'17. Circulation 



Subscription $150 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable 
to Maurice J. Clough. 

Entered »» second-class matter at tha Amherst 
Poat Office. 



have completed 28 years of continu- 
ous service. He was well known to 
several generations of students, and 
has been thus for nearly a quarter of 
a century a fixed quantity in college 
affairs. Hired men, professors and 
trustees have come and gone, but he 
has remained steadily at his post. 

In the work of the Division of 
Horticulture especially he has played 
an important part. His duties have 
been severe and exacting, but have 
been at all times performed to the 
uttermost. It will always be impos- 
sible for me to forget how often I 
have relied on his large fund of prac- 
tical knowledge and how frequently I 
have been guided by his sound 
advice. In his steadfast devotion 
to his duty and in his unswerving 
loyalty he has left a lesson for every 
member of the college community, 
from the least to the greatest. 



REXALL Baby Cough Syrup 



For a young cough. 



REXALL Cherry Bark Comp. 

For your cough. 

Each 25 cents a bottle 



Vol. XXV. Tuesday, Jan. 12. No. 15 



v. a. w. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

[Notices for this column should be dropped in 
the Coliecian Office or handed to Alfred A. 
rjioiOM'fA on or before the Saturday preceding 
each issue. 1 

January 13. 

1-10 P. M.— Assembly, Albert P. Hlair, 

journalist and lecturer. 
2 -}o v. M.— Hockiy— Springfield Y. M. 
C. A. at Springfield. 
January 14. 
645 p. M— M. A. C. C. A. in chapel. 
7-00 P. M.— Catholic club in South 

College. 
7-30 P. M.— Glee club rehearsal in chapel. 
7-p P. M.— Intercollegiate Country club, 
Flint laboratory, Dr. A. E. 
Cance, "Some Aspects of 
Co-operation." 
January 15. 
7-00 P. M.— Basketball, Seniors vs Soph- 
omores; Juniors vs Freshmen. 
January 16. 
s-jo p. M — Hockey- Ml. T. at Amherst. 
January 17. 

i> 15 A. M.- Sunday chapel, Bisdiopjohn 
W. Hamilton, boston. 

Jam ary 19. 

500 P. M.— Senior class sing in chapel. 

7-00 P. M — Stockbiidge club in South 
College. 

7 30 P. M.— Glee club rehearsal in 
chapel. 

7-30 l*. M.— Bible class at Dr. Chamber- 
lain's. 

January 20. 
i-io P. M— Assembly, Warren P. 
ders, boston. 



HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The REXALL Store on the Corner 



Lan- 



SUNDAY CHAPEL 
Rev. Arthur C. Baldwin of the 
American Baptist Foreign Mission- 
ary Society was the speaker at the 
first Sunday chapel after the recess. 
He took for his topic "He that bath 
an ear let him hear what the Lord 
sayeth." He said in part "The dif- 
ference between profane and sacred 
history is largely in the point of view 
of the writer. Had a Gibbon writ- 
ten the Psalms we would have found 
iu them only the history of the rise 
and fall of a people. On the other 
baud had one of the old Hebrew 
paslmiBts written the history of the 
fall of slavery every line would have 
breathed a prophetic vision. Today 
God is speaking Just as he spoke to 
them of old time. Even in the war 
in Europe we find that the people in 
their adversity are turning to the 
Lord as a strength in time of trouble 
and distress. The social unrest also 
shows us that God is speaking to 
men. Missionaries of commerce, cul- 
ture, learning, and politics as well as 
missionaries of religion are going out 
into the dark lands and instructing 
the people in our way of thinking. 
The individual man is coming to the 
front. God is •peaking to us and 
telling us that He want's men to 
match the opportunities offered to 
them, — let he who will hear." 

Special music was furnished by 
Worthley "18. 



UNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

RKGHLAK SUNDAY SERVICE AT 7 P N. 



E. RUSSELL NORTON 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 



MODERN REPAIR DEPT. 



SALES AGENT 



Davenport Miller 
Vein Coal 

Best Quality Pennsylvania Coal 



E.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOF.MAN 



boston office 
85 Water St. 



NEW YORK OFFICE 

1 Broadway 



E. E. MILLETT 

JEWELER and OPTOMETRIST 

Lenses ground while you wait 

College Jewelry 

Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and Guitar Strings 

AMHERST, MASS. 
Next to Post Office. 



Amherst 



CO - OP LAUNDRY 

High-Grade College Work 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

CURRAN ft DYER, Prop*. 

Loose-Leaf Note Book* and Fountain 
— Pens- 



Shirts, 
Collars, - 
Cuffs, - 
Plain wash, 
Same, rough dry, 



1015c 
2 i-sc 

2 I-2C 

48c per doz. 
- 30c per doz. 



DRY CLEAHING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, *i.5° » Suit 

R. T. Fbost, Agent ; D. Sherjnyan, Asst. Agent 

Try our ticket system 

Put full Mine and address ou laundry 



Come to us for 



AN OLD FRIEND GONE 

Sumner L. Dickinson died at his 
home iu the old Stocklnidge house 
on the College campus .Saturdnv 
evening, Jan. !•. lie had been in 
poor health for several weeks, hut 
recently had Ixen l»etter. Early 
Monday morning, the 4th, on his 
way to his work, he suffered a 
Bhock from which he never regained 
consciousness. 

The passing of Mr. Dickinson 
removes a college landmark, in 
point of service he was one of the 
oldest employes of the College. On 
the first day of next April he would 



RESOLUTIONS 

H7i?reas, It has pleased God in 
His infinite wisdom to take unto Him- 
self our friend, and classmate Willard 
Noah Morris Pease. Therefore be it 

Remlvek, That the members of the 
class of nineteen hundred fifteen, of 
the Massachusetts Agricultural col- 
lege, do hereby extend to his family 
our sincerest sympathy in their 
bereavement ; and be it further 

Resolved, That a copy of these 
resolutions be sent to the bereaved 
family, that a Copy be filed in the 
records of the class, and that a copy 
be published in the Massachusetts 
Collegian. 

Owen F. Slein. ) For the 

Philip F. Whitmorr, Y fji ftM< 

.Ki»wis C- Towaii, ) 



Fireplace Goods, Coat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 



The Hoiyoke Vaive & Hydrant Co. 

Jobbers of Wrought Iron and Brass Pipe, Valves 
*nd Fittings for Steam, Water and Gas. Asbestos 
and Magnesia Boiler and Pipe Coverings, Pipe 
Cut to Sketch. Mill Supplies. Engineers and 
Contractors for Steam and Hot Water Heating, 
Automatic Sprinkler Systems, Boiler and Engine 
Connections. • - Hoiyoke, Mass. 



Reaerved for 



BEOKMAN 



•« Hamp 



• » 



LOW PRICE TAILORING CO. 

SUITS MADE TO ORDER 
Suits Cleaned, Pressed and Dyed All kinds of 
Kepairihe for Ladies and Gentlemen neatly done. 
IliRh-grade work by first class tailor. Work 
called for and delivered. Sell tickets for pressing. 
4 suits for Si.;o 

GEORGE KOIOWITZ PROP. 

Main Street, Amherst, Mass. Nash Block 

On your way to the Post Office. Tel. 438 W 



FLEMING'S SHOE STORE 



Northampton 



For particular people 

THE ELMS RESTAURANT 

213 Main St., Northampton 

(Near Amherst car line) 



ft Quality Restaurant at Moderate 
Prices. 

TRY OUR SPECIALS 

And a la carte service. 

OYSTERS STEAKS CHOPS 
FRIED CHICKEN, ETC. 

Open 6 a.m. to 11 P.M. 

FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

Orowa by t he llorkultural Dept . 

We offer our surplus stock of cut 
flowers and plants at reasonable rates 
to students and faculty. This stock 
1 grown in modern houses under 
ideal conditions. Roses, carnations, 
violets, chrysanthemums and sweet 
peas in season. 

OROWN ON THE CAMPUS 



EBSTER'S STUDIO 

Everything in Photography 

Including Framing. 

Oood work speaks tor Itself. 

" ish Block, Amherst, Mass. 



PRESIDENT'S REQUEST 
APPROPRIATIONS 

[Continued from page 1] 



FOR 



Si 2,000 is wanted for the construc- 
tion of 8,000 square yards of macad- 
am road while the Bize of the campus 
requires certain solid walks, about 
#800 being needed for the completion 
of the granolithic walk from tin- 
stone bridge to the main road — six 
feet wide and WO feet long. 

Upon the completion of the new 
agricultural building, certain rooms, 
now used bs offices, will be vacated 
and then used for the extension ser- 
vice and other purposes. A larger 
cold storage is necessary at the din- 
ing hall. At present the college has 
dormitory accommodations for about 
one-sixth of the enrolled students. 
The demand for rooms in private 
houses has caused rents to jump to 
figures that are almost prohibitive, 
especially to those who are working 
their way through college. It is un- 
economical of time and unsatisfac- 
tory from the standpoint of disci- 
pline to have the students scatteicd 
over so wide an area as the number 
of rooms which can be secured within 
reasonable distance of the college, at 
any price, is very limited. 

The laboratory for microbiology is 
a pressing need, as there are now no 
suitable facilities for instruction. 
Although a new department, it fg 
oue of the most important lines of 
agricultural science. 



THE RIFLE TEAM 

(Contlnuifl from fiagp i] 

four entries, three classes were organ- 
ized. The twelve chilis having made 
the best record in 1919 were placed 
in Class A ; the nest twelve in Class 
II, and the new comers in Class C. 
This method of procedure worked 
out very satisfactorily and showed, 
with few exceptions, that the teams 
were fairly well matched. 

The National Rille Association of 
America has decided to keep the 
same system for the coming season, 
though Class K will be composed of but 
10 teams. The rules and regulations, 
and targets used during the former 
matches seemed to give entire satis* 
faction, and therefore, there are not 
many changes contemplated for this 
year. A sew target may he used ; 
oue which wilt be printed with eleven 
bulls, from which the live-ring will 
be eliminated, and the sighting bull 
increased to take in the seven-ring. 
The conditions for entry include all 
teams from toe Rifle Clubs of col- 
leges and universities affiliated with 
the National Rifle Association. The 
teams are to be composed of ten men, 
the five best scores to count for the 
team's record. The winning team in 
the different claseg will be selected 
on the percentage basis Instead of 
the old method of matches lost and 
won, although this feature will be re- 
tained also. 

Last year, th§ M. A. C. team fin- 
ished second, losing but one match 
tojhe Michigan "Aggies. However, 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 



Mr. Campion has just returned from England with the 

AQUASCUTUM 

OVERCOATS 

Weils-Margetson Neck wear, Caps & Knitted Vests 

On account of war it will not be possible to get any more of 
these goods, so an early inspection will be to your advantage. 




Fine Tailoring Men's Furnishings 

See Our Agents 



""f*.... 



Hubbard's B2sE Fertilizers 

the most economical you can use. 

BetteR crops 



OfcBAfrg 



°nn ecivS 



are the inevitable result. 



***TII 

THE ROGERS ft HUBBARD COMPANY, Middletown, Conn. 

onto* «n«l Work*, Portland, Conn. 



Burpee's Seeds 



arc supplied every year 
direct to more Ameri- 
can planters than are 
the seeds of any other growers. Do you know Burpee- 
Quality "Seeds that Grow** ? If not, we would like to 
make your acquaintance. Simply send us your address 
(a postal card will do) and you will receive Burpee's 
Annual for 1914, — a bright new book of 182 pages, which 
is recognized as "The Leading American Seed Catalog." 
Kindly write to-day! Address 

W. ATLEE BURPEE & CO. , Burpee Building,, Philadelphia 



F. A. SHEPARD 

MEN'S STORE 



USE OUR NEW CASH DISCOUNT CARD 
AND SAVE FIVE PER CENT ON 

SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING 

Furnishings and Custom Tailoring 



C&rptrvter & Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 



No. 1, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mats. 







; 



1 
4 






The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 12, 19'5- 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 12, 1915. 



JORDAN MARSH COMPANY 

Boston ■ 

TWO GREAT BUILDINGS-OVER 1,000,000 SQUARE FEET 
OF FLOOR SPACK-169 SEPARATE SELLING SECTIONS. 

For Room Furnishings, Wearing Apparel, Unique and 
Practical Articles for Gifts-in fact each of the thousand 
and one things student life calls for-this store is the logi- 
cal Chopping place for the college men of New England. 

Our Clothing and Furnishings Store is just a step from 
Summer Street. Do not fail to visit when you are in Boston. 
It is filled with just the kind of toggery young men like. 

All Purchase* delivered FREE to Amherst. 
Mail Outers given prompt attention. 



t r 



IS 



who had a good eve for the baskc 
Lack of team work was eapeciall 
apparent in the play of the upp 
classmen, individual following of tl 
ball leaving the basket unguardi 1 
many times. 

The second game proved to be a 
closer and more exciting content 
although the 1917 men got an earlv 
lead over their recent rivals which the 
juniors never threatened seriously. 
Here, as in the first game, tetter 
passing and team work by the sopho- 
mores kept their opponents guessing 
from the start. Perry's Bix goals 
from fouls netted half of 19 NTs 
points, while Hagelstein and Graysou 
divided honors for the sophomores. 

The score : 

NINETEEN-FIFTEKN. 

Fd.G. F.G 



THE 

Hoover & Smith Go. 

616 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 
Diamond Merchants..... 

Philadelphia's Official Fraternity Jeweler 

SPECIALISTS IN 

Fraternity Badges, Fobs, Novelties, 

Rings, Charms Prises Trophies, 

Medals College Pins, Fobs, Seals, 

Rings, Charms .'. 



; S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Now at 13 Pleasant St. 
( iculists' I'rescriftious Filltd. Hroken Lenses 

Accurately Replaced. Hne\Satcli Repairing 
Promptly and .-kilfully Dour. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 



Fitzgerald, rg 
Frost, lg 
Dole, c 
Pike, rf 
Smith, If 

Total, 



- 7 



1 — 



1 



iv 



7 



it 



BIDE-A-WEE" 



the Maroon and White still remains 
in Class A, along with the Michigan 
Aggies, Minnesota, West Virginia, 
California, Iowa State and Norwich 
University. The final result of last 
year's shooting places the University 
of Illinois which was in Class C into 
Class A. and Washington State Col- 
lege, Cornell, and U. S. Naval Acad- 
emy' which were iu Class B, move 
up to Class A. Harvard, Princeton, 
Mass. Institute of Technology, and 



NINETEEN-EIGMTEEN. 

Fd.G. F.G. 



I 
I 
I 

6 



Batchelder & Snyder Co. 

i- \( ki 1:- POUI.TKY DKKSSKKH 
ANI> IIUITKH HABBM. 

WHOLESALE UEALKRS IW 

Beet, Mutton. Lamb. Veal. »■» ta^Wsy. 

Bacon. Sausage*. Poultry. Uarne. Butter 
Cheese, Ejgs. Beans. 

office k *t »*•« ItfMM* " «Vi ?l ack *M»t« St ' 
B,U.-.n P*Wng 'louse. ""Khton. Mass. 
N uue I* >>iltrv I>ressm(j Plant, Boston. 
Creameries in Vermont. 



Tel. 4'5-W 



"SCOTTIE" 
H. HOOPER 

Will t lean and press your clothes so you 

will be satisfied. It costs no more 

and he is nearer to "Aggie. 

LUKKAL TICKET SYSTEM 

Under Columbia Cafe 



Creamed Chicken and Waffles 

Our Specialty— And other good things to eat 

MRS. L. M. STEBBINS, 
Middle street, — Hadley. Mass. j tue North Georgia Agricultural Col 

lege drop back into Class It. 

The following is this season's 
schedule : 

U. S. Naval Academy 
Washington State College 
Iowa State 
Cornell University 
Norwich University 
Minnesota 
Illinois 

West Viiginia 
Perdue 
California 
Michigan Aggies 



E. B. DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 

Williams block, • Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hours: otoUA. M.. 1-3010$ P.M. 



Telephone S9— K 



STEAM PITTING. 
GAS PITTING. TINNING. 

F. W. DANCE & CO., Plumbers 

Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, Mf.morial 

Windows, I.f.ad I.m.hts. &c. 

A Clifton Ave.. AMHKRST. MASS. 



THIS TBWt»»»V PARLOR 

( :ie»n«lnic I'rr-aalnie Repairing 
Quick"*! seerle», HtHrt Work. UweM Price 
All woik carefully done. Work called for and 
delivered. Genu* overcoats, suits, pants and 
coats. Ladies* tine linen suits a MJWa'tv. 
Teams will call every day at M. vc 

VM, FKANKMN. IT«»|». 
Rear Nash Bl'k, Amhertt. Tel. No. 34»-4 



Jan. 14. 
.lun 21. 
Jan. 28. 
Feb. 4. 
Feb. 11- 
Feh. 18 
Feb. 25. 
Mar. 4. 
Mar. 11. 
Mar. 18. 
Mar. 15. 



Minor, i I 

Vakers, > rg. 
(irayson, ) 

Gaaaer, lg 

Grayson, | 
Hawley. S ' 
Sedgwick, rf 

Hawley, I )f 
Thompson. I ' 
Total, 

NINETEEN SIXTI-EN 
Fd.G. 

DarttRf, rg 1 

Walk den, lg — 

Peiry, c • 

Little, if ' 
Hall, If 

Total, 



1 



— 1; 



10 



F.G. 



3 « 

MNETEEN-SEVENTEEN. 

Fd.G. F.G. 

Mack, rg — — 

Kelsey, lg — _ 

Hagelstine, 4 

(irayson.rf 3 3 
Irving, If 

Total, 



8 



•9 




Huntington Ave., Exeter and Blagden Sts.. Boston, Mass. 

Headquarters for College Men when in the city. 

AMOS M. WHIPPLE, prop. 



Now is the time to be planning for 



FraternityGroups 

Have them taken at 

MISS McCLELLAN'S STUDIO 

44 State Street, - - ' Northampton, Mass. 



INTERCLASS BASKETBALL 
In the first of the interelass basket- 
ball aeries in the Drill hall Friday 
night, the freshmen won a 25-9 victory 
over the seniors, while the sopho- 
mores defeated the juniors in an 
exciting game by the score of 19-12. 
None of the teams displayed very 
brilliant form but after making allow- 
ances for early season lack of prac- 
tice, it is safe to say that some fast 
and close games will be seen during 
the winter. 

In the opening game the seniors 
were clearly outclassed by the clever 
pass work of the first year men, and 
had it not been for Frost's good eye 
in shooting goals from fouls, 1915*s 
score would have been very small. 
That the freshmen still need much 
practice in shooting, however, was 
well shown by the large number of 
their shots which went wide of the 
hoop. Sedgwick being the only man 



COMMUNICATION 

(Communication* to the CoLMtOMK concern 
ins matter* of general interest are welcomed 
The Collegian is not to be held responsible 
for the opinions thus expressed.) 
EUTTOR OF TUB Ma-. COLLEGIA* : 

Dear Sir: 
It Is the desire of the Aggie con- 
tingent in Hawaii, otherwise knownl 
as the M. A. C. club of Hawaii 
that some few facts regarding tbt| 
formation and purpose of our organ- 
izatton be published in the Coin 
oias. We have been organized fori 
about a year now and our member- 
ship includes the following men, III 
of whom are on this island : W. <> I 
Smith ex-'73, A. M. Nowell es- Tt j 
E. A. Back *04, E. T. Bartlett am 
C. B. Thompson '07 (the latter no*j 
in Manila) "Dave" Larsen 'm 
Putnam *09, Partridge *10, Willar 
»11, Borden, Brewer and French l>| 
Bokelund and Brewer M4. WH 
this combination Aggie holds tl 
record over all colleges and uni* erj 
si ties for the largest number of HH 
la the islands, in proportion to A 



it of both the student and alumni 
.lies. In fact, not more than three 
^titutions, Harvard, Yale and Cor- 
,11, have more representatives here 
in total numbers than little Aggie. 
The club no doubt originated on a 
.rial platform but it is our intention 
expand its purposes to even more 
rf ul things. At the last meeting, 
1 ,UI on Dec. 12, we started a cam- 
paign for boosting the college among 
prospective students here. Agricul- 
ture in some form constitutes the 
main industry of the islands and 
■ ;urally there are a good many men 
in line for our arguments 

A. M. Nowell is president of the 
I club, with Dr. Back as secretary- 
ti< usurer. 

Very truly yours, 

J. D. French '13. 



M. A. C. 1914 club of Amherst is 

[planning a get-together feed at Rahar's 

lin Northampton, Sunday, Jan. 24 at 

7 r. m. All members of 1914 desir- 

ling to attend will please notify Ben 



Porter, Amherst. 



Dotel OJarrcn 

South Deerfield, Mass. 

T. «f. AHERN, MANAGER 



11 i-s Amity Street 

fodern Shoe Repairing 

ANNOUNCING 

'5c Special Half Sole, Rubber 76c 

KKI'AIWIXi; 

lllack, Tan, White Work Guaranteed. 

PRICBB 

t-jbber Sotes •l.BO 

(ubtwr Soles, with Heck . . . »i :.i 

oles Sewed, 7flc 

at Shlnea for S1.00 



VI LAVAL 

BUTTER 

»>*?■*»* <*•» usual 

1914 NHTIONflL DAIRY SHOW 



Bl'TTER made from cream sepa- 
rated by De Laval Separators 
made the usual clean sweep of 
I all highest awards at the great Na- 
tional Dairy Show held in Chicago 
|Um October, as it has always done at 
levrry convention of the National 
1 1'- utterm altera Association or a Dairy 
[show since the beginning of these 
Ltmpertant annual contests in 1893. 

Ihe Sweepstakes and Gold Medal 
toward! went to De Laval made butter 
|" 'he following classes; 

Whole Milk Creamer) Butter 
GatNni Cnin Creaiery Butter 

(Nearly ill De Laval; 

Fan Dairy Butter 



HE DEUViU SEPARATOR CO. 



I*t "roadwar 



to E. Madison St. 

CHICAGO 



NINKTEUN-THIRTEEN NOTES 

Fred Griggs, editor and business 
manager ; George Zabriskie, 2nd, 
advertising manager County Leaujue 
Adciser, official organ of the Hamp- 
den count v improvement league. 

"Zwastzie" writes that Forbush is 
now teaching agriculture in the pub- 
lic schools of Bu vanion, Porto Rico. 
Reyer is spending a couple of months 
with his folks in the quiet little ham- 
let known as Mexico, his addres 
being Calle la Madrid, No. 15, Mex- 
ico City. 

Ralph Howe left the cotton-boll 
weevil in Louisiana long enough to 
spend Christmas at home and was 
around campus for a lime. 

Speaking of Mexico, according to 
the last Mockin Booster, "Casey,' 
JoneB and Miller Jordon are having 
one grand round of socials, recep- 
tions, et cetera. 

Clyde M. Packard recently took a 
long trip through Missouri, Okla- 
homa and Northern Texas iuvesti- 
gating new corn pest. Headquar- 
ters, Wellington, Kans. 

Glover K. Howe has matriculated 
at Harvard Medical School. Home 
address, Marlboro. 

"Willie" Covill, "War" Little, 
"Mike" Lyons, Seth Howe, George 
Zabriskie 2d, "Bruin" Brown, Waldo 
Tucker and Nichols were among the 
1913 men at the Princeton game, 
Jan. 4. "Qnin" Lowry very effic- 
iently acted as goal-judge at the Yale 
and Columbia games in New Haven 
and George Greenleaf popped in at 
the Yale game. 

Marshall Headle, manager of the 
J. W. Adams greenhouses, Spring- 
field, growers of plants, cut flowers 
and ferns. Headle "M" has cer- 
tainly humped some since leaving 
college and is still hustling. Address 
458 Dickinson St., Springfield. 

ALUMNI NOTES 

'HS. — Samual M. Holman, secre- 
tary of the AtUeboro chamber of 
commerce, was one of the reception 
committee at a reception and dinner 
recently given by that bodv. 

*87.— Charles H. Watson died last 
September at San Antonio, Tex, 

*00, — Francis G, Stanley was re- 
elected to the Beverly school com- 
mittee at the recent election. 

'04. — Sumner R. Parker has re- 
signed as superintendent of the 
Mixter farm at Hardwick to become 
farm expert for the Franklin county 
bureau, with headquarters at Green- 
field. George E. Taylor '02, is also 
prominent in the affairs of the new 
county bureau. 

The following is the standing of 
the competitors for the business de- 
partment of the ( oi.i.i ■.<; i \ s to date : 

lil7 
M, C. Warner 44.50 credits 

1918 
R. C. Hlis 20.50 " 

J. C. Powell 19.00 " 

W. R. Sears. 



Che Pheasant 

Bmitx? St., Bm be ret 

Breakfast, Luncheon, 
Afternoon Tea, 

Dinner if arranged for. 
Telephone 470 

Rooms for Transients, 




An especially liood Commission Proposition— 

Cash for test ordeis — Article Wlilely Advertised— 
Cuts down expense in poviei plant*— Addn-ss 

Eniiinkkkinc Supply Co., 2238 N. oth Street, 
Philadelphia, fa. 



tbeTeachers Exchange 

Of Boston 120 Boy I it am St. 

Recommends Teachers, Tutors and Schools 



* They're not short-lived 

The Jerseys 

In 1913 eighteen Jersey 
cows wire officially tested 
which averaged \: years 
and 7 months of ape. Their 
avenue milk production 
\..io.t '7 pounds. Average 
butter I .(. 3H pounds. One 
of tU.e cows was over 18 
years old. 
Longevity, Contttfu'ton oral Economic 
Production an- Jers.f C4fu acterustics. 

THE AJJEB1CAN JIMS! Y CATTLE O.HS 
324 W. 23d St.. Mew York City 




** 



Aiwrkaa Fo»nt»i» F>» C«.. Mr*. 
Ate*, fakin A Few. ! 
MS »e*Mtkire St. I 



just the kind ol pen 

you like to use inclans 

orin "exams." Starts at 

a touch — keen* on writing 

smoothly ALL the way and 

closes up bottlf tttfht. The 

original "wen leak" pen, 

you know, 127stvlesand 

smrs front $2.£0 Dp. 

At all Co!!«" 8 letttMW 

lllwt&writkk 




EL Frank Coe Fertilizers 

1 QC7 THE BUSINESS FARMERS' STANDARD IQI/i 
lOOf FOR OVER FIFTY-FIVE YEARS lgl«t 

Do You Raise 300 Bushels of Potatoes pir Acre? 

HREE hundred bushels per acre is 
not an unusual yield by any means, 
but did you get it this year ? 
Clf you were planning to raise 300 
bushels of potatoes to the acre how 
^ far apart would you space your rows? 
How far apart would you drop the seed pieces in 
the row? 

•JHow much fertilizer would you use to grow 300 
bushels of potatoes per acre? How would you 
apply it ? 

€|Are you sure that your seed potatoes arc true to 
name and true to type ? 

IJWhat are you doing to prevent "scab," and early 
and late blight ? 

CJDid you have a short crop of potatoes because of 
dry weather ? Have you decided how you w ill 
overcome this trouble in the future ? 

<]AII these practical points, and man? mora, are fully covered an our 
new book 

"Potatoes: A Money Crop" 

which will he seat free to every potato grower who requests a copy, and 

mentions ibis paper 

tJThiii book is written by a man who himself has bad years of experience as 

a potato grower, and who baa made a carelul study of the best methods of 

other growers. 

*Jlf vou read this book you wlH keep it for future reference It is a "worth 

while** puhlic ifion 



The Coe-Mortimer Company 



51 CHAMBERS STREET, NEW YORK CITY 



J 



T ?! 



IT 



J 



8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, J ami. 12, 1915- 



— JOIN THE BUNCH AT 

EPSTEIN'S TAILORING PARLORS 

Now located over post nilic. Up one Bight 

Pressing and Cleaning a Specialty 

Liberal Ticket System Tel. 36-M 

5H0E STORE 

Shoes Repaired by Machinery 

SHOE SHINE 

Open Sunday from 7.1a. On your way to P. O. 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Oflers courses of instruction in twenty-seventeaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science- 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



The Highland Hotel 

Corner of Hillman and Barnes Streets, three 
blocks from the Union Depot, is • modern hos- 
telry run on the European Plan. It is just a step 
from Main Street, away from the noise and dust 
and vet in the center of the business district. 

Its rooms are well furnished and comfortable, 
having a telephone and hot and cold running 
water in every room. Prices »l and up; rooms 
with bath (single) «1.50 and up. 

Its excellent cuisine and well ventilated dining 
room makes a meal a pleasant memory-every- 
thing of the highest quality, well cooked and 
served in the best possible manner. 

Stay at the Highland Hotel once and you will 
anticipate staying there again. Music every 
evening. 

D. H. SIEVERS, 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 



Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 

Agricultural Chemistry 



FOUNTAIN PENS 

Moore's Swan's 

Waterman's 

Thirty-six dozen pens to select from. 

OUR RULE 

"Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded." 



HI K lil mid Hotel, 



>l»riiik'ti»-M. Mii«». 



SIOBrJIfOUITNE 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AMD 

CARPET ROOMS 



Economic Entomology 

Microbiology 

Plant Physiology and Pathology 

Agricultural Education 

Rural Social Science 

For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 

KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, PRESIDENT 
AMHERST. MASS. 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



Associate Alumni, 

Joint Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics, 

M. A. C Athletic Fic'd Association, 

The College Senate, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association. 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Rifle club, 



K>r»i.initi' isea 

Stkpukn Lank Folgkk 

MANcraoTURiNO jnru.ii 
ISO BROADWAY. NEW YORK 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 

C. A. Peters, Secretary 
Philip 11. Smith, Secretary 
C. S. Hicks, Treasurer 
K. Towne, President 
J. A. Price, Manager 
S. Prouty, Manager 
E. F. Clark, Manager 
E. S. Draper, Mauager 
II. Bishop, Manager 
R. M. Upton, President 



CLUB AND OOLX.BG E 
PINS AND RINGS * 

BOUI, M.I.VKK AMD BIOOTI M»I>AIX 



E. D. MARSH ESTATE 



"fiy COX SONS 

^Pk& —AND — 

flHR. VINING 

71-74 Madison Avenue, New York 

CAPS AND GOWNS 

Beat Materials and Workmanship 



sters J- F. Nicholson, Producing and Business Mauager 

Roister uoisiers A A|lderBOIlf Manager 

Musical Association, ., ,.„_.__ Mmiairer 

Nineteen Hundred Fifteen Index, "• M. Koge™, Mam g 

Nineteen Hundred Sixteen Index, L ^a^flB 

M. A. C. Christian Association, »• «• J » » Pre8it j t .nt 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, \, ^ffi FrSdeut 

Fraternity Conference, F.'whitmore, President 

Stockbridge Club, , — 



RAHAR'S INN 

Northampton, Maeaachuaette 

TWO BLOCKS FKOM THE DEPOT 

The hotel where there is comfort (with- 
out extravagance.) More popular 
than ever. 

Special Luncheon I 2-2 P. M. 

PRIVATE DININC ROOMS 
AU Carte Service 
6 30 to 1 1 p . m . 



There are SeYen Good Reason* whv ■■■•%• "Id 

buy yout 



COAL 

or 

C. R ELDER 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 



37 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



Stationery, Newspapers, 
Magazines and Col- 
lege Supplies 

A J. HASTTNGS 

Newsdealer. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Mt., alongside the 
famous Bloody Brook battle ground 
to Old Deerfkld, thence to Green- 
field, Turners Falls and across the 
"Plains" to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 

50 Mile* of Trackage -ftodern 
Equipment -Trata D lspatc h- 
Ing System- Freight and Kx- 
press Service over entire line . 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
Company 



j 



CARS 



Leave AOOIE COLLEGE for HOL- 
YOKE at 15 mln. past the hour. 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST for ACWIE COL- 
LEOE at 7 and $7 mln. pe»t the hour. 

at 



ICE CREAM, 



Omd mly Mm i A. M, m 4 A.M. 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our producL 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers ol H Gold Medal Uniforms, " 

1424-14.6 Chestnut St, Philadelphia, Pa. 



AMHERST « SUNO miAHO SI. Bt. C O 

For a Daily and Sunday Newspaper 
Yoa should Read 

TUB 

Springfield Republican 

While you are at college in Amherst. 



It ha - aJl or T»« M . A. C. Kerwa 

Tii.- »••»< Spertinc Mews 

Kill I « Jrll«THl H*WB 

A Btiam Kaitorlai P—e 

1 lit.- r. M I UK K.*t 11 r.H 

It la • R^»> MaWapapar 

Daily. % cents*, 70 cents a month \$t* 
a quarter. 

Sun&ty, 5 een-»J ¥> «° tt * quartet 

Subscribe fay sail or through the A inherit i ■*» I 



THEM) 





JAM 21 !91i 

A,jyprinte!t:i 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXV. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, January 19, 1915. 



No. 16 



1915 FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 
INCLUDES HARVARD GAME 



Dartmouth Heads Eight Game List. 
Colby and Middlebury Con- 
tests on Campus. 

Dartmouth and Harvard are the 
two games that start the football 
schedule for the coming year. In all 
there are eight games of which two 
in- to be played on the campus. 
Colby will be met here on Oct. 9, 
and Middlebury will be played on 
Nov. I, in Amherst. 

As in the two proceeding years 
Dartmouth will start the season off, 
Mini the Aggie players will invade 
tlir town of Hanover on Sept. 2/i. 
Harvard will then he played in Cam- 
bridge on the nest Saturday, Oct. 2. 
Thin is the first game in football that 
has ever been arranged with the 
: 1 imson and although a victory can 
not be predicted with certainty, a 
d showing by the team will raise 
the college in the eyes of the Boston 
football enthusiasts. The following 
Saturday, Oct. 9, Colby will play 00 
the campus. Last year, the Aggie 
team lost in a very close game, 6 to 

to the Maine team and another 
,.'0011 game is ex peeled for the com- 
ing year. Colby will be the first 
game t<> be played on the new athletic 
Held and a victory would be a fitting 
I'll bratiou of the event. A week 
from the Colby date, the annual Holy 
• os» game will be played at Wor- 

• -tei and the next Saturday Wor- 
cster Tech* will be played in the 
vi me place. If two victories are 
Hi.ide, the good reputation of the eol- 
in Worcester will be retained 
and the popularity of Aggie with 
tt 01 <»Mter preparatory men still fur- 
ther increased. The big Tufts game 
will be played at Medford Saturday, 
•Kith. As in past years a large 
d ' legation from the student body wiU 
"mpaiiy the team and cheer for a 
victory that was so nearly a reality 
year. Nov. 18th. the last game 
1 he season will be played with 
S ngfield Y. M. C. A. at Spring- 

I he 1919 football team will lose 

'■ >rge Melicnn, last years enptatn, 

1 bo played a very consistent game at 
1 iter hark and proved a real leader 



JOURNALISTIC PRACTICE 

DISCUSSED BY MR. BLAIR 



Yellow Journalism and Newspaper 

Diction Humorously and 

Seriously Treated. 

Not for a long time have the M. A 
C. students enjoyed an address 
more than the amusing but instruc- 
tive lecture given by Mr. Albert L. 
Blair at the Wednesday assembly ex- 
ercises. Mr. Blair was for 12 years 
editor of the Boston Journal, and 
has been working in journalism for 
over SO years. In telling his ex- 
perience and also his opinions of 
that line of work he proved beyond 
the shadow of a doubt that he was 
thoroughly acquainted with both the 
humorous and the serious affairs of 
the journalist of today. 

Mr. Blair kept the students in 
continuous laughter by his lively 
jokes and witty remarks and when 
the end of the hour came, he was 
urged not to stop. 

In the first part of his lecture, 
which might more properly be called 
a talk, the journalist described con- 
ditions in the newspaper world as 
they are at the present time. Elec- 
tricity, he declared has revolution- 

af ' 

Ized the press, through the speed of 



'< >nt • nurd on pur 51 



! 



1 



the team. Dole, who was the 

iii-stay of last year's line, will also 

lost by graduation. Whorf will 

< a gap in the back field that will 

hard to fill, while Fuller, who de- 



RELAY TEAM STARTS WORK 

Trrrs to i-.i Mkt Nkxt Satikiiu in 

Posit Match of Smmml 

Class Tkams Mm i. 

Saturday, Jan. 2.'1, the varsity 
relay team will compete with Tufts 
in their annual run held during the 
Coast Artillery Meet in Boston. 
Kach man will run 320 yards. Coach 
Dickinson is very optimistic a. tout 
tin team and hopes to tie the series. 
The first race was held in 1912 and 
Massachusetts was victorious, while 
Tufts won in 1913 and 1914. 

In order to stimulate interest in 
relay running. Coach Dickinson and 
Manager Clarke have devised a plan 
to have inter-county races at regular 
intervals. Men at college from the 
different counties of Massachusetts 
(Dukes County excepted) wIU elect 
managers and organises teams to 
enter the schedule. Teams of Con- 
necticut and New York state men 
will be considered as county teams. 
Not more than one man of the track 
■quad will be allowed on any one 
learn. The distance to be ran bv 



{CdtttlaMMs ©H 



II 



COMPETITION ANNOUNCED 
FOR ORIGINAL RURAL DRAMA 

Award of $50 to be Oiven Successful 

Author of Play for the 

Roister Doisters. 

Rural drama is the question that 
the Roster Doisters are now to under- 
take and the society has planned a 
competition for the writing of a rural 
drama by an undergraduate of this 
college. The rules of this contest 
are printed below. The society 
believes that the rural drama is a 
live question and is takiug this 
method of awakening interest iu the 
matter. 

At the present time there are no 
works that may be truly classed under 
this head. Rural drama iu its best 
sense means plays which present 
rural life in all its phases, showing 
its problems, vicissitudes, its pleas- 
ures, and its intimate life. The 
modern popular drama of today deals 
largely with the problems of urban 
society and this new rural drama 
deals with the various problem of rural 
life in a similar way. 

All drama relating to rural life or 
formerly classed as rural drama that 
now exists, is, with but few excep- 
tions, far from what is desired. Such 
a play aa "The Road to Happiness,* 1 
is but a comedy in a rural setting. 
Most of the others are burlesques on 
country life and people. 

Such playB have a harmful effect 
in that they criticise and injure 
country life with the powerful weapon 
of ridicule. There is no excuse for 
their existence for the country life 
of the nation is largely the nations 
life, and is not a subject for empty 
jest. On the contrary much good 
can be dotie by a sympathetic inter- 
pretation of the life and interests of 
the agricultural people, It is for the 
creation and production of such plays 
that the dramatic society is working. 
Within the list month ms Iters have 
come to a head and nave resulted in 
the announcement printed below, 
offering a prise for a good rural 
drama. 

Through the kindness of a friend 
of the Milage and a representative 
of the Roister Doister Dramatic 
society, a prize of foO is now offered 
for the writing of a real rural drama 
at this college. The following rules 
will govern the competition s 

1 , The competition shall he open 
for any member of the undergraduate 



[Continued on 



*if 



[Continued un 



Jl 



TWO GOALS DEFEAT M. I. T. 
IN CLOSE HOCKEY MATCH 

Rough Game Played on Poor Ice Re- 
sults in 2-0 Victory for the 
Aggie Team. 

Though hindered by |>oor ice, the 
Maroon and White hockey team dis- 
played its superiority over the M. I. 
T. contingent by defeating the latter 
on Saturday afternoon at Pratt rink, 
Amherst, by a score of 2 — 0. The 
unseasonable warmth of the day was 
the cause of the poor condition of 
the ice which was very soft, espe- 
cially near the edges, making drib- 
bling and passing practically impos- 
sible and slowiug up the game to a 
considerable extent. As a result, 
the game was noticeably marked by 
individual work and much rough 
playing, though the latter was 
reserved principally for the second 
half. The teams, however, were 
well balanced, the M. I. T. aggrega- 
tion pulling up a stubborn tight 
every minute of the game. The 
Maroon and White were well pre- 
pared for a hard tussle, for only a 
few days before, Yale was forced to 
10 minutes of extra playing to gain 
a decision over M. I. T. 

"Whistle" Woolley, the Aggie left 
wing, was easily the stnr of the 
game, featuring in both scores and 
playing a heads gftOM at all times. 
He repeatedly took the puck away 
from bis husky opponents to the 
merriment Of several hundred Aggie 
rooters, while the manner in which 
he followed the pack behind the net 

was a constant source of trouble to 
the Tech goal tender. Captain 
Archibald also showed up well, 
■mashing numerous onslaughts with 
l he able assistance of Ross, and 
often lead the attack down the lot 
with a remarkable burst of speed. 

The first tally for M. A. C. came 
after 10 minutes of play, when 
Woolley scored on a pass from In 
iiaM during a scrimmage about the 
net, A few minutes later, it looked 
like another score for the Aggie*. 
and even though the M. I. T. goal 
tender backet! up and fell over with 
the cage, the opponent's defense hail 
tightened up and a good opportunity 
to increase the score was lost. 

The second half started with a 
rush, Johnson carrying the puck into 
the opponents' territory. The Aggie 
forwards peppered tha Tech net ; 
in fact, the home Mam was superior 
throughout this period and kept the 







The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 19, 19 15. 



1 






19. ^'S* 



puck around their opponent's cage 
during the greater part of the time. 
Teeh seemed to brace up for a min- 
ute and made their only threatening 
rally of the game, liuttrick, how- 
ever, was always at his post, and 
easily cutoff any hard shots, lbe 
second and final Aggie score came a 
moment later, when Captain Archi- 
bald dribbled the puck up the entire 
length of the rink and passed it to 
Fernald who slipped the puck past 
Johnson. From now on the game 
was marred by rough playing, which 
was the cause of several penalties. 
However, the game was full of inter- 
esting and exciting moments, though 
lacking in spectacular plays. 
The line-up and summary 



tech. 
rw, Fletcher 
|w, Johnson 
r, Kteler 
c, Coward 
cp, Woodward 
p, Gould 
g, Johnson 



AGGIE. 

Wooley, lw 

Fernald, rw 

Chisholm, r 

Johnson, c 

Archibald (capl.), cp 

Ross, p 

Buttrick, g 

Score- Aggie 2, Tech o. Goals- 
Wooley, .0 minutes; Fernald, 5 minutes 
Penalties-Cochran, . minutes rough- 
ness; Cochran, . ■*«** *•"£ 
Cochran, 2 minutes, roughness Referee 
-Bacon of Amherst. Ump.re-Need- 
ham. Goal umpires-Melican and Dole 
T j me _two 20-minute halves. 



To date, the hockey team has won 
four and lost four games; having 
defeated Uensalaer I'olytecu *-<», 
Columbia 6-0, West Point 7-1 and 
Massachusetts Institute Technology 
2-0, and losing to Williams 2-0, Dart- 
mouth 4-2, Princeton 3-2 and \ ale 
6 2 The game scheduled with 
Springfield Y. M. C. A. college for 
Jan. 13 was cancelled due to lack of 
ice and because of a full schedule, 
can not be played at any other tune. 
However, the Springfield college will 
be played immediately after semester 
n„als, on Jan. 30, probably at Spring- 
field. , , 
The first hard game in the second 
semester comes on Feb. B when the 
Aiscie seven meets Harvard at the 
Hoaton Arena. Harvard has defeated 
M 1 T. and Princeton losing only to 
the fast Queen's college team of 
Canada. Last year's Mass. Aggie- 
Harvard game went to KMmnules 
overtime before the University team 
could win a 4-3 victory. Dartmouth 
lip „enra M the campus on the first 
Saturday of the second semester, 
Feb 8. The game will be a fast one 
a8 the Massachusetts boys are bent 
on retrieving the 4-2 defeat adminis- 
tered to them by Dartmouth in the 

Arena. 

Dartmouth has had a very success 
f ul season to date losing only to 
Ottawa university and defeating 
Massachusetts and Princeton, and 
appears to be a strong contender for 
ttu Intercollegiate championship. 
A return game with M. I. T. in the 

Boston Arena is pending for either 
Feb. 20 or Feb. 27. 



RELAY TEAM STARTS WORK 

lContin»«i tram p»l«2> 

e^lTman -ill be'two laps and help 
"be given bv Co** , » -" 
m afternoon between 3-80 .rfMO. 
Gym credits will be g.ven snd the 
Ending of the individuals - H be 
kept to determine poss.ble candidates 
fo the varsit, sqoad. The schedule, 
Lch will begin Feb 1, «dl b. an- 

nounced later. 

la the first part of the toterclass 
relay races held Saturday, the juniors 
Juom the seniors and the sopho- 
mores defeated the freshmen. I be 
Tunior team displayed the better form 

and ran the eight laps in two min- 
utes 11 1-5 ^onds, which was two 
londs faster than the sophomore 

T' the first race, Batnbridge '18 
got the start but fell on the first 
Lk, giving Holt a substantia lea- 

Although Baker cut down the dis- 
tance, the odds were too great an 1 
the sophomores were never headed. 
Sturtevant crossed the line with a 
lead of 15 feet over Mitchell,making 
the time of the winners ! 
i:i 2-5 seconds. 

Johnson and Mostrom started the 
second race and were nearly even a 
the end of the two laps. Russell put 
the juniors well in the lead and they 
were never in danger. The time was 
2miuutes, 11 1-5 seconds 

The teams were : 1915-Johnson, 
dough, Smith, Bishop; PJir.-Mos- 
, ro m, Russell, Darling, Lmdquist , 
1917— Holt, Buchanan, Pratt, Stur- 
tevant; lyiH-Baiubridge, 
Rabbitt, Mitchell. 

The intcrclass relays will be held 
in the form of two -round robins, 
each team meeting every other team 
twice. The points won will count 
for the class championship race which 
will be held March 20 at the inter- 
class meet. At this time, the last 
two races will be run. Nestweek 
on Jan. 25 the seniors will mee the 
aoi.honiores while the juniors will run 

tbe freshmen. 

For the first half of the tourna 
oent two laps will be run by each 
man, but on the second engagement 
between classes, th.ee laps will be 
required of each participant. 



FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 

f Continued from page i] 



. 87 ,_Charles H. Watson died last 
September at San Antonio, Tex. 



veloped into a steady linesman, will 
leave a vacancy in the line. 

Next season, Darling and Palmer 
wi ll be the only veterans in the back- 
field. On the line there will be Cap 
t „i,i Curran and Plaistcd for the 
tackles, Jordan and Perry for guards 
!lI1(l Grayson and Day for ends,-all 

M men. 

The schedule follows : 

Sent 25. Dartmouth at Hanover 
Harvard at Stadium 
Colby on the Campus 
Holy Cross at Worcester 
Worcester P. I. 
Tufts at Medford 
Middlebury on the Campos 
Springfield Y. M.C. A. 
at Springfield. 



SUNDAY CHAPEL 
Bishop John W. Hamilton, who 
was the speaker in the Sunday chapel, 
gave a most interesting address on 
"War." In the course of his I 
marks he said : 

"War is only a weapon; a rnde 
one of a rode people in a rode age. It 
ia the mode and measure of pagan- 
ism, it never has settled anything ; 
therefore it must be put away. Ever 
since the world began, classes have 
been set against masses. The things 
for which the world has fought may 
be classified under three heads ; the 
stronger preying upon the weaker : 
the extension of territory, the bal- 
ance of power. It has always been a 
case of every man for himself. Jesus 
was not of evolution, but of revolu- 
tion. He came to set up a new na- 
tion where there should be no com- 
petition but co-operation. War is 
antiquated. China, the most anti- 
quated nation of all, madly plunged 
into war with Japan and | soon ^ after- 
ward she defied the whole habitable 
world. In spite of this she had more 
cause for aggrevation than any otther 
nation. The Russo-Japanese War 
mediated by the President of the 
United states, so that both nations 
were left in the same position that 
thev were in before the war. War 
is merelv a spectacular drama and 
the present war is as belated in its 
methods of adjustment as any war 
in historv. The best possible defini- 
tion of w'ar is that might makes right ; 
there is nothing Christian about that. 
What is paganism ? It « ™ 
natural expression of physical force. 
But it is not of the nature of physi- 
cal force to settle dirtlcnlties of 
warring minds and hearts. They 
should not be settled between sword 
and sword, or between fist snd fist, 
but between mind snd heart. There 
never can be a last war for when 
there is more force, there will be 
more trouble. For the present war 
there can be no adjustment without 
overwhelming defeat. But watt- 
le maketli war to cease, he cutteth 
bow and spear asunder, and burneth 
the chariotin the fire. He that take* 
the sword shall perish by the sword 
and My Father shall send a legion of 

angels against him." War « «mplj 
an appeal to the two ineontestibte 
standards of righteousness **f«™- 
Both sides believe they are right, but 
there is more wrong on both sides 
than they wlU admit, and it is he 
difference In opinion that makes the 
difficulty. There is only one right- 
eousnes. as there is only one truth 
and that is the only troe ■*««■»* 
that is possible in history. That set- 
tlement, however, is not brough 
about by means of the charnel spirit 
or weapon 



^HObTfEBRUARY 13 

Prom season opens this year Feb^ 

12. With the date less than a 
Lonthaway,itiswelltegoove^ 

opens Friday noon. Friday » 
noon there will be a hockey game a 

Pratt rink with Boston college. At 
L'clock the Musical Clubs give tbe 

annual prom concert in the cbapel^ 

The prom itself begins at 8 M£ 

Kriday night ^^ D ^ % 
Philharmonic orchestra. 
wm begin at 8-45. At midnigh 
there will be an i^rm.ssionjo a 
light supper to be served in the din 
ingU. l Dancing will be ,«-»«£ 
at 1 o'clock and will continue until 
early morning. Saturday afternoon 

dance in tbe drill hall. It mil las 
nntil 5-30. Saturday -^ the 
Bolster Doisters will give th „rl *»» 
production, -Her Husbands Wife 
in the Amherst town hall. Ihe 
town hall will be onu.ua ly well 
decorated as the committee has 

8e cured the "*^V^T£- 
culture Department which has con 
aented to lend palms and o*e 
plants. Sunday noon the season 
closes, ending the biggest social 
function of the year. 

The committee desires the co-oper 
ation of the whole college and J 
striving to make the prom the best 
ever. The management request* 
that no flowers be worn on the floor. 
The preliminaries and invitations an 
now being sx>ld by Hathaway Roo|.. 
12, South College- The tickets will 
be $10 and will include the prome • 
ade and incidentals connected - 
it, and the informal dance baturdu) 
afternoon. The Musical C»ub co, 
cert and the Dramatic ^<™ 
are separate. The price o these 
tickets will be announced later. 

« u u vour last chants 

Seniors, it is your nm 

while members of the student bod> 
Juniors, -Be there" ; shower ol- 
time class spirit. Sophomores, don 
et the younger class get ahead of 
T on. pUmen, it is the first chan. 
o? your college career for a big tune 
Don't mis. it. Alumni, here's 
chance to remember former dances 
the college and renew your acquaint 
ance* on the campuB 



Oct. 2. 
Oct. U. 
Oct. lfi- 
Oct. 23. 
Oct. 30. 
Nov. 6« 
Nov. 13. 



. 8 3,_Samuel M.Hoiman, secretary 
f the Attleboro chamber of com- 
merce was one of the reception com- 

irtwl at a reception and dinner 
recently given by thai body. 



WFL1 TEAM 

Snows Good Fo« « F,bst Math. 

The first week of the rifle tca»| 
J^n of matehe. ended last Satur 

day theM.A.ateamrnnn^up 

8. Naval Academy, as yei *■* i 

eome of the contest has l*** 

*Tde public, but in all probabilH 

the Maroon and White has come . 

the victor. The score was very | 

considering that it we. the begionu 

3 the season — «* *"J 

MT eral new men to develop. Tto-j 

the first year that A. U. b- »«£ 

Academy appear, in Cla« A, «■■»■ 

Year's performance elevating it to w 

present po.it.on. Last year, the I 



A. C. team scored 948 in its first 
match against Perdue university, and 
finished with an average of 968. As 
is seen by the present score, the 
Aggies are in good form, and should 
run up some excellent scores before 
the year is over. The U. S. Naval 
Academy finished the past season 
with an average of 933, and judging 
feom her past performances, M. A. 
C. should be in the lead. 

In this match C. M. Gunn was high 
man with the exceptional score of 196 
Captain Lane was second man with a 
total of 193, while Macy, Hotis, R. 
M. Upton followed closely behind 
with a total of 192, 191 and 191 re- 
spectively. These Ave men are Bure 
to approach the high records made by 
last year's team, as they are meeting 
with strong competition from the 
other men. All indications point to 
tbe fact that there will be a continual 
change of the first five men in each 
mateh, as the second team have been 
doing consistently good work through- 
out the season. 

The teams are now completing the 
match with Washington State college 
which should prove rather easy for 
the M. A. C. men. The scores for 
the Navy shoot are : 



St 


anding 


Prone 


Total 


Ciunn 
Lane 
Macy 
Hotis 
Upton 


97 
97 
95 
92 

93 


99 
96 

97 
99 
99 


196 

•93 
192 

191 

191 


Totals for first five 




963 


I'armenter 

Aiken 

Wetherbce 

Haskell 

Clapp 


9° 
9° 
88 

87 
87 


97 

99 

99 

too 

99 


189 
189 
187 
■87 
iS6 


Totals for first ten 




1901 


RURAL DRAMA 


COMPETITION 


[Continued from pag* 


1] 





body of tlio Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural college. 

2. Tbe play most be of consistent 
dramatic construction and mast play 
a full evening or at least two hours. 
It shall consist of at least eight and 
not more than twenty characters. 

8. The drama mnst treat of some 
rural problem and the solution of this 
problem must be brought about in 
the action of ton pUy. 

4. Rural life roust be treated as 
it really I. and all evidence, of the 
burlesque must be omitted. 

5. The committee of judge, .hall 
consist of one member of the English 
department, of one member of the 
department of Rural Social Science, 
and a representative of the Bolster 
Doister Dramatic society. 

6. The judges reserve toe right 
to reject any or all of tbe plays 
submitted. 

7. All desiring to compete for 
this prize are requested to hand In 
their names to the office of the Pres- 
ident not later than the MM. of 

January. 

8. The competition will close on 
the gOth of September and at that 
time the judges will meet to pass 
judgment on the merits of plays 
submitted. 



CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

Thursday's meeting of the Chris- 
tian Association was addressed by 
Rev. J. C. Wightman, of Hatfield, 
who gave a very interesting talk on 
his experience in mission work among 
the small hill towns of Hampshire 
county. He begau with a good word 
for the Y. M.C. A. as an organization 
which can bring young men to a 
closer relationship with the best 
things of life. Mr, Wightman said 
that it was through a Y. M. C. A. 
worker in Belfast that he was first in- 
duced to change his life and follow 
the work he is now doing. 

His work takes him to all the re- 
motest towns of this district, yet 
wherever two people are together, 
God is with them. Particularly is 
this noticeable in times of ttonble, 
when people feel the nearness of the 
Almighty and search themselves to 
find wherein they have sinned. Thus 
a country missionary is continually 
seeing the influence .of God in his 
work. Inasmuch as some 200 coun- 
try churches are not able to pay their 
way, Mr. Wightman works to bring 
the church to the people by holding 
meetings in tents, moving from one 
village to another week by week. 
Along with the religious meetings are 
often held farmer's days, when the 
farmers of the community can get 
together to talk over their various 
problems. This is the strongest evi- 
dence of the church aggressive, and 
there are many instances to prove 
that good results have come from 
such efforts. 

Country churches are particularly 
slack in business methods, in fact, 
anv other business rnn in such a slip- 
shod way would soon fail entirely. 
Brains are needed in the work of tbe 
church just as any other bnsineM, 
and hen- 1. where the young college 
men in the rural community has his 
opportunity to do a service to the 
church which cannot be overesti- 
mated. The future of the church is 
an assured fact, for the chuich is at 
the heart of society. Any man who 
fails to recognize this fact, fail* in 
making himself a man of tbe fullest 
usefulness in serving bis community, 
for only through the church can the 
great social progress of the country 
be realized. 



DR. R. 



C. 

Dentist 



NASH'S BLOCK 

Evenings by Appointment. 



hotel marro. 

South Deerfield, Mass. 

T. ll. AHERN, MANAGER 



Let us help you to cut down your Prom expenses 

We can sell you 

A Full Dress Suit 

That Is absolutely correct and that we fully guarantee 

For Thirty Dollars 

Made by Hart ScharTner & Marx. 



We huve all the accessories for full dress wear 

Gloves, $1.50 

Opera Hats, $5.00 

Scarfs, 50e to $3.00 

Shirts, $1.50 to $2.00 

Vests, $2.50 to $5.00 

Overcoats, $15 to $22 



I 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



Important Notice 



! 

Twenty-flve cents will be put in a box for the 
NEW ATHLETIC FIELD every time you 
buy shoes at our store costing $3.50 or over. 

VERY LATEST STYLES. 

Shoes for the Drill- $2.50 to $5.00 



Pase^ Shoe fiStojre 

School and College Pbotograpfters • • . 




On Gents' Furnishings, 
Overcoats and Suits 

GOODS SOLD AT 20 PER CENT DISCOUNT 

All lateit foods from Urge aisoriment 

Don't Miss This Bargain Sals t 

Yon can alao buy a few 
... Pressing Ticket* oil this discount... 

C lot hci c a I led f o r a n d del i ve red . 



Telephone joi-W 




LOCALLY: 



5a Center St., Northampton, Mass., 

snd South Hadley, Mass. 




Main Office: 

1546-1548 Broadway, 

Nnr York City 



These Studios offer the best skilled 
artists and most complete 

equipment obtainable 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



-in- \i.i-.K 1 - IS- 



Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 19, 1915. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 19, 1915. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

BOARD OF EDITORS 

PRANK W. BUELL '15, 
TYLER S. ROGERS'i6, 
HENRY H. WHITE 'is, 
JAMES A. PRICE'iS. 
E. SUMNER DRAPER 'is 
THOS.L. HARROCKS'16, 
ALFRED A. GIOIOSA»i6. 
FRANK J. SCHEUFELE, 
MILFORD R. LAWRENC 

RICHARD W. SMITH '17, 



Editor-in-Chief 

Managing Editor 

Assistant Editor 

Athletic Editor 

Athletic Editor 

Department Editor 

Campus Editor 

Alumni Editor 

E'i7, 

Associate Editor 

Associate Editor 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

MAURICE J. CLOUGH '15. Business Manager 
CHAS A. HUNTINGTON, JR. '16, 

Assistant Business Manager 
W. RICHARDSEARS '15. AdrertisinRMan'gV 
LESTER E. FIELDINC16, Ass't Adv. Mgr. 
BIRGER R. ROSEQUIST'i7. Circulation 



Subscription #1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make ail orders payable 
to Maurice J. Clough. 



Entered as 
r>«* Office. 



matter at the Amherat 



Vol. XXV. Tuesday, Jan. 19. No. 16 

Once more has the appeal for 
money ami aid from the athletic field 
committee gone forth unto the under- 
graduate body and once more has it 
been met whole heartedly and hon- 
estly by the students. At the pres- 
ent time the actual figures are not at 
hand but it is certain that a generous 
response was given to this appeal to 
the undergraduates to build Alumni 
field. Interest is not wanting here at 
college in this matter and the vision 
Of a completed and fully equipped 
athletic field. worthy of this college, is 
still the Mecca to which the under- 
graduates are striving. Aggie spirit 
•is one that may not be blazoned forth 
in double leads on the advent of a big 
football game by metropolitan papers 
but it is a soiiH-thing that gives a 
sense of work well done to a conscien- 
tious Massachusetts man, and this 
support of the athletic field is but 
another illustration of that spirit. 



DbaMAHOI have received a stimu- 
lating start for this season and are on 
their way to make the best record yet 
accomplished at Uiih college bv the 
Hoister Doisters. Further interest in 
this college activity will doubtless be 
brought al>out by the article printed 
elsewhere in the COUJKMAX in regard 
to the rural drama. Atflrst thought, 
perhaps, it may aeem to many of the 
undergraduate body that that they 
b:ive no ability in the direction of 
play writing* Such is not necessarily 
the case for, to use a trite expression, 
one can never tell until he tries. It 
bus also been stiid. by a present day 
author of wide reputation, that every 
man fondly cherishes in his mind the 
idea thnt lie can write a novel or a 
drama and in his heart he means to 
soon attempt it and make it a suc- 
cess. To the student body then It is 
a golden opportunity to "obey that 
impulse," win fame, fifty dollars and 
the plaudits of »he multitude. 

The effort made in this direction 
will aid the writer both in confidence 



and use of Knglish which are elements 
that are deficient in scope at this col- 
lege due to lack of practice. But 
there is a larger field than this, such 
a drama has never been written at a 
college and it will be original in its 
treatment of the problem. There is 
an opportunity at the present time for 
a drama of this sort to become a vital 
question of the day. Let there be a 
whole hearted attempt at this drama 
writing for the opportunities that 
await the successful man well merit 
any amount of time, thought and 
effort that will be put into it. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

[Notices for this column should be dropped in 
the Collegian Offiee or handed to Alfred A. 
Gioiosa'16, on or before the Saturday preceding 
each issue. 1 

January 20. 

1-10 p. M. — Assembly, Warren F. Land- 
ers, Boston. 

January 22. 
8-00 A.M.— Semester examinations begin. 

January 23. 
630 P. M. — Social Union. To be an- 
nounced. 

January 24. 
9-15 a. m.— Sunday chapel, Rev. Firm- 
ing James, St. Paul's Chinch, 
Englewood, N.J. 
January 30. 
',0-0 P. M.— Hockey— Springfield Y. M. 
C. A. at Springfield. 
Fehruary 1. 
1-00 P. M. — Second semester begins; 
regular schedule of classes. 

February 2. 
5-00 p. M.— Freshman class sing in 

chapel. 
7-00 p. M — Stockbridge club in South 

College. 

7 30 P. M.— Glee club rehearsal in 

chapel. 
7-30 r. M. — Landscape Art Club in 

Wilder Hall. 
7-30 Y. M. — llible class at Dr. Chamber- 
lain's. 

Fehruary 3. 
1-10 l*. M. — Assembly, l'res. Kenyon L. 
Hutterfield. 

8 15 P. M. — Hockey— Harvard at Boston 

Arena. 



COMMUNICATION 

(Communications to the Cm 1 rgian concern- 
ing matters of general interest are welcomed. 
TheCoiLMiiAN is not to be held responsible 
(or the opinions thus expressed.) 

Kixtok ok TBI Mass. COLUOIAH : 

Dear iSir : 

May I have just a few lines in your 
excellent paper? 

It is no doubt geuerally known 
that I have been relieved from duty 
at the College to take effect .Ian. 81, 
Before leaving Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural college I want to say just a 
word to express my deep fueling 
of gratitude to the student body for 
(heir genuine loyally to me in the 
work of my department as well ns 
their kindness to mc personally. 
Because of my crippled condition the 
work carried on in my department 
would have been bard for me except 
for the enthusiasm and hard work by 
the students themselves, 

For nearly two years I have re- 
mained hen-, feeling that another 
would do much better work, to make 



Perry '16 

CHOCOLATES FOR THE PROM 



ORDER NOW 



Perry '16 

Alpha Sigma Phi House 



HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The REXALL Store on the Corner 



CJNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

KKOUI.AK SUNDAY SERVICE AT 1 P M. 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 



MODERN REPAIR DEPT. 



E. RUSSELL NORTON B.M.BOLLES 

THE SHOFMAN 



SALRS AGENT 



Davenport Miller 
Vein Coal 

Best Quality Pennsylvania Coal 



BOSTON OFFICE 

85 Water St. 



NEW YORK OFFICE 

1 Broadway 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

CURRAN * DYER, Props. 

Loose- Leaf Note Books and Fountain 
— Pens— 



E. E. NILLETT 

JEWELER and OPTOMETRIST 

Lenses ground while you wait 

College Jewelry 

Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and Guitar Strings 

AMHKRKT, MASS. 
Next to Post Office. 



Amherst 



GO • OP LAUNDRY 

High-Grade ColUge Work 



Shirts, 
Collars, 
Cuffs, - 
Plain wash. 
Same, rough dry, 



10-15C 
2 i-ac 

% I-2C 

48c per doz. 
30c per doz. 



DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing, sec a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, #1.50 a Suit 

R.T. FaosT.Agent; D, Sheeihyan, Asst. Agent 
Try our ticket system 

Pat full name and address on laundry 



Come to us for- 



Fireplace Goods, Goat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING GO. 



The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co, 

Jobbers of Wrought Iron and Brass Pipe, Valves 
and Fittings for Steam, Water and Gas, Asbestos 
and Magnesia Boiler and Pipe Coverings, I'ipe 
Cut to Sketch, Mill Supplies. Engineers and 
Contractors for Steam and Hot Water Heating, 
Automatic Sprinkler Systems, Boiler and Engine 
Connections. • - Holyoke, Mas*. 



Reserved for 



BECKMAN 



11.m11> 



LOW PRICE TAILORING CO. 

SUITS MADE TO ORDER 
Suits Cleaned, Pressed and Dyed. All kinds of 
Kepairihg for Ladies and Gentlemen neatly done. 
High-grade woik by first class tailor. Work 
called for and delivered. Sell rickets for pressing, 
4 suits for *i 50 

GEORGE KOTO WIT Z. Prop. 

Main Street, Amherst, Mass. Nash Block 
( >n your way to the Post Office. Tel. 438- W 



FLEMING'S SHOE STORE 



Northampton 



For particular people 

THE ELMS RESTAURANT 

213 Main St., Northampton 

(Near Amherst car line) 



A Quality Restaurant at Moderate 
Prices. 

TRY OUR SPECIALS 

And a la carte service. 

OYSTERS STEAKS CHOPS 
FRIED CHICKEN, ETC. 

Open 6 a. m, to 1 1 p. m. 



FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

Grown by the Floricultural Dept. 

We offer our surplus stock of cut 
flowers and plants at reasonable rates 
to students and faculty. This stock 
is grown in modern houses under 
ideal conditions. Roses, carnations, 
violets, chrysanthemums and sweet 
peas in season. 

OROWN ON THE CAMPUS 

Telephone 800 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Everything in Photography 

Including Framing, 

(Jood work speaks for itself. 

Nash Block, Amherst, Mass, 



sure that my successor would be the 
right uiau for the place. In Lieut. 
Fleet I am confident you ar« to have 
such a man and I know thatat an early 
date you will kuow him only to love 
and admire him and to work hard for 
the good of the military work and put 
it on a much higher plane than ever 
before. 

In over nine years of service I do 
do not think of a student for whom I 
have any but respect ami the best of 
feeling and hope all will make them- 
selves known to me if ever in the 
vicinity of ray future home, for the 
latch string will he hanging out for 
one and all. 

With best good wishes for you and 
all I am 

Most sincerely yours, 

Gkokgk C. Maktin, 
Capt. I*. N. Army, Retired 

ASSEMBLY 

[Continued from page, 1] 



transmitting news. The telephone 
is now used most extensively. Won- 
derful inventions, however, are be- 
ing made constantly, — inventions 
will come which will make this age 
seem crude compared with the world 
that will be. Modes of living, travel, 
education, and all, will be greatly 
changed. 

Mr. Blair then told about the life of 
the newspaper reporter, and gave a 
sample program of an average day's 
work accomplished by a reporter. 
"No other life has such a quick suc- 
cession of events as the life of one 
of these men," he said. Then fol- 
lowed a general discussion and con- 
demnation of the present great use 
of slang terms in newspaper articles. 
The speaker gave some very apt and 
humorous examples. 

The main subject of discussion 
was the so-called "Yellow Journal- 
ism." Mr. Blair in describing this 
said, "It is oue of the five or six 
greatest hindrances to the progress 
of civilization. In the yellow jour- 
nals one cannot tell where truth, if 
there is any at all, ends, and where 
lying commences, This evil played 
a very prominent part in the spring 
of 1933 in connection with the terri- 
ble floods in the Ohio Valley. It jh 
also said that it bad to do with the 
starting of hostilities in Europe in 
the present Great War. 

"The purpose of this infernal and 
conscienceless yellow press of Amer- 
ica is merely to sell more papers ; — 
truth is not considered whatsoever. 
It is lying, and misrepresenting 
to the people, and it is a menace to 
the peace of empires," 

In closing, Mr. Blair declared that 
the time will sometime come, and be 
wished that he might only live to see 
its coming, when these evils shall 
lie done away with, aud conditions 
snch as never have existed before 
shall be found in the entire world, 

*0Q. — Francis G. Stanley was re- 
elected to the Beverly school com- 
mittee at the recent election. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 



Mr. Campion has just returned from England with the 

AQUASCUTUM 
OVERCOATS 

Wells-Margetson Neckwear, Caps & Knitted Vests 

On account of war it will not be possible to get any more of 
these goods, so an early inspection will be to your advantage. 




Fine Tailoring 



Men's Furnishings 



-5ee Our Agents- 



Hubbard's B°sE Fertilizers 



##** i» u » >.,.. 




f *tniLYZ&* 



the most economical you can use, 

BetteR crops 



are the inevitable result 



THE ROGERS ft HUBBARD COMPANY, Middletown, Conn. 

OHl«'»i Mini Work*. I'lirlhtiHl I urn,. 



[J f & are supplied every year 

DlirDCe S lJee(lS dircctt "nioreAmeri- 

* can planters than are 

the seeds of any other growers. Do you know Burpee- 
Quality "Seeds that Grow" ? If not, we would like to 
make your acquaintance. Simply send us your address 
(a postal card will do) and you will receive Burpee's 
Annual for 1914, — a bright new hook of 182 pages, which 
is recognized as "The Leading American Seed Catalog." 
Kindly write to-day! Address 

W. ATLEE BURPEE & CO., Burpee Buildings, Philadelphia 



A. SHEPARD 

MEN'S STORE 




Use our new cash discount card 
and save five per cent on 

SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING 

Furnishings and Custom Tailoring 



Carpenter St Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 



No. 1, Cook Place, 



Amherst, M 




The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. i9> *9*5- 



JORDAN MARSH COMPANY 

Bosto n 

TWO GREAT BUILDINGS— OVER 1,000,000 SQUARE FEET 
OF FLOOR SPACE— 169 SEPARATE SELLING SECTIONS. 

For Room Furnishings, Wearing Apparel, Unique and 
Practical Articles for Gifts— in fact each of the thousand 
and one things student life calls for— this store is the logi- 
cal shopping place for the college men of New England. 

Our Clothing and Furnishings Store is just a step from 
Summer Street. Do not fail to visit when you are in Boston. 
It is filled with just the kind of toggery young men like. 

All Purchases delivered FREE to Amherst. 
At nil Orders given prompt attention. 



of individuals failed j stand out as 
did the team work 'oi the respective 
fives but some spectacular shots by 
Pike, Hawley and Gasser featured. 
The defensive work of Little was ex- 
ceptional and the playing of Grayson 
hud much to do with the sophomore 
victory. 

The series now stands with the 
sophomores in the lead with a clean 
slata of two wins while the freshman 
and juniors are tied with one won and 
one lost, the senior team bringing up 
in the rear with two losses and no 
victories. 

The summary : 

NINKTEEN-SKVF.NTEKN. 

Fd.G, F.G. P. 

Mack, rg 102 

Kelsey. Ig 000 

Haglestein, c 1 o 2 

Grayson, rf 243 

Irving, If 204 



! 



THE 

Hoover & Smith Go. 

616 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 
Diamond Merchants 

Philadelphia's Official Fraternity Jeweler 

SPECIALISTS IN 

Fraternity Badge*, Fobs, Novelties, 

Rings, Charms Prizes Trophies, 

Medals College Pins, Fobs, Seals, 

Rings, Charms .*. •"• 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELEK & OPTICIAN 

Now at 13 Pleasant St. 

Oculists' I'tBM riptious Filled, Broken Lenses 

Accurately Keplaced. Fine Watch Repairing 
Promptly and skilfully Done. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 



Batchelder & Snyder Co. 

PAtKKKft. POULTRY DRKUBM 
vm- 1.1 1 1 1 1: M AKKRA. 



-WHOLESALE USALESS IN- 



B*rf\ Mutton. Lamb, Veal, Pork. Lard. Ham*. 

Bacon, Sausages. Poultry. Uame, Butter 

Cheese, Eggs. Beans. 

Office k M »f* lVfM?|f*i '»' * h J Blackstonr St. 
K,>ston, Packing House. lUmhton, Mass. 
Native Poultry l>ra»*ing Plant, Boston. 
Creameries in Vermont. 



M 



BIDE-A-WEE " 



"SCOTTD3" 
H. HOOPER 



Will clean and v 



your clothes so you 
It 1 



nd pr 
will l)c satisfied. It costs no more 
and he is nearer to "Aggie. 

I.IHKRAL TICKET SVSTBM 



Creamed Chicken and Waffles 

Our Specialty —And other good tilings to eat. 

MRS. L. M. 5TEBBIN5, 

Middle Street, Hadley, Mass. 

TsL 4i$-W 



E. B. DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 

Office Hours: to i» A. M.. 1-30 to $ r. M. 



STEAM KITTING. 
GAS FITTING. TINNING. 



Telephone jo— H 



Under Columbia Cafe 



F. W. DANCE ft CO., Plumbers 

Specialty of Repair!**: 

Church Wimmjws, Mrmorial 
Windows, I.rad I.u.hts. Ac. 

• Clifton An. AMHERST, MASS. 

1 111 ri-ivi-.— v PANM>K 

1 leanalaa pPMMJaaj BtfMMrlne; 

Quickest wr.i.-r. Stoat \» ... w. 1 ..»• -1 PttaSJ 

All work carefully dene. Work caUed for and 
delivered. <;ents* overcoats, suits, pants and 
coats. Ladles' fine linen *uitt a specialty. 
Teams will call ever* day at M . A . C . 

w m. HtANhiiN, Prop. 

Rear Nash BPk, Amherst. Tel. No. 341-4 



STOCKBRIDGE CLUB 

At the weekly meeting of the 
Stockbritlge club on Tuesday evt-ii- 
Iftg, Cande ' 15 and Taber '16 were 
the speakers. Iu discussing k 'Berk- 
shlre Hogs," Cande first told of their 
origin and general characteristics, 
after which he spoke of feeding and 
cholera, saying in part: "The best 
time to sell pork is when the hog 
weighs between 100 and 200 pounds. 
It is most necessary that the pigs 
should get an #arly start and they 
should be kept growing all the time. 
This necessitates keeping a close 
watch over thera. Asjto cholera, the 
best cure is prevention. This may 
best be done by keeping the bogs 
clean and by keeping any new hog 
quarantined under close observation 
for a short time. Care should be 
taken to stay away from all infected 
herds and people should lie kept out 
of the hog lot. Although the hogs 
may be inoculated this will render 
them immune for a short time only, 
while if thev are vaccinated they will 
be imuuiiir for life. The latter 
method, however, may scatter the 
germs, and also the virus may be 
infected with the foot and mouth 
disease. 



Total, 








«9 


NINETEEN-FIFTEEN. 










Fd.G. 


F.G. 


P. 


Smith, If 













Pike, rf 




4 


O 


8 


Dole, c 







O 





Frost, Ig 




2 


2 


6 


Fitzgerald, rg 













Total, 






• 4 


Suhstitutions- 


-Pike 


for Dole, 


IllltIS 


for Pike. 










NINETEEN SIXTEEN. 










Fd.G. 


F.G 


F. 


Darling, rg 




3 





6 


Moses, Ig 













Perry, c 




2 


3 


7 


Little.rg 













Hall, If 




1 





2 



Total, 



NISETEEN-EKOITEEN. 

Fd.O. F.G. 



•5 

P. 

3 

o 
6 

2 
1 



Hunt In iet on Ave., Exeter and Magden Sta., Boston, Mass. 
Headquarters for College Men when in the city. 

AMOS H. WHIPPLE, prop 



Now is the time to be planning for 

FraternityGroups 

Have them taken at 

MISS McCLELLAire STUDIO 

44 State Street, • • * Northampton, Mass. 



INTERCLASS BASKETBALL 

After what proved to be two of the 
most exciting basketball games seen 
on the drill ball floor in a long time, 
the juniors and sophomores emerged 
victorious over their freshman and 
senior rivals. The score of the 
sophomore-senior game was 15 to 14 
and that of the junior-frenlman game 
15 to IS. 

While at times tin- vt 1 y eagerness 
of the playeres tbmitened to cause 
the games to become rough, the team 
worls of all the teats* was very good. 
The seniors mnde n wonderful come- 
back after n hud il> feat of the week 
before nn«l I he juniors more than 
lived up to c.\|M(ta lions in defeating 
the fast fieahman team. The playing 



Hawley. If 1 1 

Sedgewick, rf 00 

Grayson, c 3 ° 

(i.isser, lg 1 o 

Miner, rg o I 

Total, is 

Substitutions— Sedgewick for Grayson, 
Vickers foi Sedgewick. Referee— Swaf- 
field of Brown. Umpire— Hicks of M. 
A. C. Timer— Palmer '16. Scorer— 
Watren 'if, Announcer— Gore. 

DR. CANCE SPEAKS 
At the weekly meeting of the Coun- 
try Life club, lit. Cance gave an 
interesting talk OB "Co-operation." 
la part, he said ; 

The organization of the small 
country towns is essential for effic- 
iency in dealing with rural affairs. 
It is the small farms that are the units 
and as a majority of the farms are 
under 150 acres, the field is a large 
one. The lack of organization affects 
the units In baying and selling, hut 
In efficiency, they are at their best in 
producing. Therefore, the farmer 
should produce in units and buy and 
sell in a combination or organization. 
Id Massachusetts, there has been a 
building of community organization, 
which in turn will be united under a 
Federal head in the future, accord- 
ing to present plans. Thus, the 
farmer will more easily obtain pro- 
tective legislation. The handling of 
farm productions should be a commu- 
nity job. Even though the small 
towns are dead, they are there wait- 



-rrr«i 



Tne Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 19, 191 5, 



1 



ng for developmei .nd the field is 
1 xtensive ; and it is with the commu- 
nity that they look for aid. 

The present day factor in commu- 
nity organization is the county ad- 
viser. Throngh him, co-operation 
should be made with the State col- 
lege, the bureau of markets and the 
Jtareau of Ag lie ul tare. 

Thus we have the successive fac- 
tors: first, the small farm or the 



J. GINSBURG 

f 1 i-a Amity Street 

Modern Shoe Repairing 

ANNOUNCING 

75c Special Half Sole, Rubber 75 c 

wi;i'\ii<i\(. 
Mack, Tan, White Work Guaranteed. 

PRICE8 

Rubber Soles Sl.ffO 

Rubber Soles, with Heels . . . SJ1.7rt 

6olsS Sewed jae 

i'i .Milne* for Sl.OO 



unity, the federations or community 
organizations, then, the larger feder- 
ations and finally the United States 
Bureau of Agriculture. When this 
system is in complete working order, 
the advancement of the small towns 
will be marked and the small farmer 
will be raised to a higher and more 
efficient plane of living. 



5 



FOI 1008 DEI fj 

Beautiful College Pennants V 
YALE and HARVARD, 

Each 9 in. x 24 in. 

PRINCETON, CORNELL, 
MICHIGAN, 

Each 7 in. x si in. 

4— Pennants, Size 12 x 30—4 

Any Leading Colleges of 

Your Selection 

JAII of our best quality, in their 
proper colors, with colored emblems. 

Either assortment, for limited time, 
sent postpaid for 50 cents and five 
stamps to cover shipping costs. 

Write us for prices before placing 
orders for felt novelties of all kinds. 

The tie m City Novelty Co., 

40a Bittner Street, 
Dayton, - - Ohio. 



0£ LAVAL 

BUTTER 

beat mm usual 
* it time urtrit 

1914 NATIONAL DAIRY SHOW 

BUTTER made from cream sepa- 
rated by De Laval Separators 
made the usual clean sweep of 
all highest awards at the great Na- 
tional Dairy Show held in Chicago 
laat October, as it has always done at 
every convention of the National 
Huttermakers Association or a Dairy 
Show since the beginning of these 
important annual contests in 1892. 

The Sweepstakes and Gold Medal 
awards went to De Laval made butter 
n the following classes! 

Whole Mil Creamery Butter 
Gathered Cream Creamery Bfltttr 

(Nearly all De Laval) 

Farm Dairy Butter 
fHEOE LAVAL SEPARATOR CO. 



65 Broadway 
aaw voaa 



S9 K. Madison St. 
Chicago 



ALUMNI NOTES 

To alumni located at some distance 
from Boston — A suggestion : Come to 
Boston on Feb. 3 for the Aggie-Har- 
vard hockey game at the Arena, plan 
a day's business in town or visit 
friends and come to the Massachu- 
setts Alumni Club dinner at the 
American House on Friday the 5th. 
That is a worth while trip. Come to 
tbe dinner and reunion any way. 
Watch the Collegian for further 
details, 

BOSTON ALUMNI DINNER. 

To alumni of New England — our 
annual dinner and reuuion will be 
held Friday, Feb. 5 at the American 
house, Bostou. Flan to spend a 
pleasant and profitable night with a 
bigger crowd of typical Aggie men. 
Watch the Collegian for further 
details — keep this date open — Feb.5. 

P. W. l'lt-KARD, 

43 Chatham St., Boston. 
NOTICE WOHC ESTER COUNTY 

AJLN. 

The M. A. C. '^ttjftdfof.^ot^fcn- 
eounty will >l fcuie Mutual rca- 

tauraut, Wi>rc<<lteT^^rffiJH|Hl^ 
o'clock to organize an alumni 
association. A large delegation is 
expected. Undergraduates are in- 
vited to be present. The dinner will 
be $1.50. Please make reserva- 
tions before Monday, Jan. 25 to Har- 
old J. Neale, Room 24, City Hall, 
Worcester. 

M. A. C. is well represented in the 
new society, American Academy of 
Arborists, organized at New York 
City Jan. 2 for the promotion of the 
highest standard of maintenance of 
Arboriculture and Landscape For* 
estry. William W. Cotton ex-*06 of 
Newton, was chosen second vice- 
president and Harold J. Neale '09 of 
Worcester and James H. Walker *07 
of Newark, N. J. are directors. Dr. 
George E. Stone of Amherst, Harry 
R. Filer '06 of Buffalo, Addison T. 
Hastings *06 of Jersey City and John 
A. Anderson *08 of Montclair, N. J. 
were elected "Fellows" as members 
are called. 

*t>2.— Cyrus M. Hnbbard died re- 
cently at his home in Sunderland, 
He had been ill for many months and 
the end was not entirely unexpected. 

Mr* Hnbbard was educated in tin 
local school* and took the four year 
coarse at this college. After gradu- 
ation he became interested in funn- 
ing, especially tobacco, and was one 
of the pioneers in raising tent tobacco. 
At college he was a member of Q. T. 
V. and later became affiliated with 
the Masonic order and other similar 
organizations. 




Cbc pheasant 

Smits St., Bmbcret 

Breakfast, Luncheon, 
Afternoon Tea. 

Dinner if arranged for. 
Telephone 470 

Rooms for Transients. 

theTeachers Exchange 

Of Bitten 120 Boy I st on St. 

Recommends Teachers, Tutors and Schools 



An Especially Good Commission Proposition 
Cash for bast orders— Article widely Advertised— 
Cuts down expense in power plants— Address 
EN.iiNEBHiNc. Supply Co.. 3*38 N. yth stie.t. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 



* They're not short- lived 

The Jerseys 

In 1913 eighteen Jersey 
cowi were oificially tested 
which averaged I'i years 
and 7 munths ol ape. Their 
average milk production 
v,.isN»'l7 pounds. Average 
butter 1 .1, 3F7 pounds. One 
of the. a cows was over 18 
years old. 

Longevity, Constitution nn<t Economic 
Production are J^i^.y c.iaiacterutics. 

AMEBIC AN J.KSKY CATTLK CLUB 
124 W. 234 SI., New York City 




Just the kind of pen 

you like tu use in clavs 

orin "exams." Starts at 

a touch — krep«o:i writing 

smoothly ALL Mie way and 

closes up bottle light. The 

original "won' leak" pen, 

you know. 127s»v!esand 

stirs from $2.f0 up. 

At ■! Co*V— 0«h!g 
aaaaUDt !tr» 



Ai»th •■ Feaataia Pea C*., 
Asms. iWkot A Titer . Salsf J 
fit MevMikirt St. BottM, I 




I 



i 



1 AK7 I HE BUSINESS FARMERS' STANDARD -I r, 1 A 
IPO/ FOR OVER FIFTYFIVE YEARS 15714 




Do You Raise 300 B ushels of Potatoes p«* Acre? 

— ■ — — — 

HREE hundred bushels per acre is 
not an unusual yield by any means, 
but did you get it this year ? 
flit you were planning to raise 300 
bushels of potatoes to the acre how- 
far apart would you space your rows? 

How far apart would you drop the seed pieces in 

the row? 

flHow much fertilizer would you use to grow 300 
bushels of potatoes per acre? How would you 
apply it ? 

flAre you sure that your seed potatoes are true to 
name and true to type ? 

flWhat are you doing to prevent "scab,'* and early 
and late blight ? 

flDid you have a short crop of ootatoes became of 
dry weather ? Have you decided how you will 
..overcome this trouble in the future ? 

f ™ SBBBBlBBBB*SBJBJPSBl SB BS1 SMMMSSSSSSSSSSSS* 

QAII these practical point*, and many more, trc fully covered in our 
bow book 

"Potatoes: A Money Crop" 

which will he seat frea to every potato grower who reqiWkls ■ copy, sad 
mentions this paper. 

tJThis book is written by ■ men who himself has bad years or experience ■• 
■ potato grower, and who has made • careful study oi the best methods of 
other growers. 

«Jlf you read this book yoa will keep it for future reference. It is s "worth 
while" publication. 



The Coe-Mortimer Company 

51 CHAMBERS STREET, NEW YORK CITY 



V 



8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Jan. 19. l 9*5- 



JOIN THE BUNCH AT 



EPSTEIN'S TAILORING PARLORS 

Now located over post ottice. Up one Hiylit 

Pressing and Cleaning a Specialty 

Liberal Ticket System lei. 36-M 

T. MIENTKA, 

SHOE STOKE 

Shoes Repaired by Machinery 
SHOE shim: 

1 Ipen Sunday from 7-12. On your way to I*. ( >. 



The Highland Hotel 

Corner of Hillman and Barnes Streets, tliree 
blocks from t tie Union Depot, is • modern hos- 
telry run on the European Plan. It is just .1 lt«B 
from Main Street, away tioiu the noisr ami dns1 
and yet in the center of the business district. 

Its rooms are well furnished tad comfortable, 
having a telephone and hot and cold running 
water in every room, t*l ices *l .nut up; rooms 
with bath (single) •LAW and up. 

Its excellent cuisine an! well ventilated dining 
room makes a meal a pleasant memory— every- 
thing of the highest quality, well cooked and 
served in the best possible manner 

Stay at the Highland Hotel once "id you will 
aSticifatt* staying there again. Music every 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Otters courses of instruction in twenty-seventeaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science- 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



evening. 



D. H. SIEVERS, 



Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 

Agricultural Chemistry 



Highland Hoi. 1. 



SpriiiKfielil, MOMi 



\* 



STUDEHTFBBH1TUBE 

RUGS 

CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New Kn 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 
EXPENSES Enable mi 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 

Economic Entomology 

Microbiology 

Plant Physiology and Pathology 

Agricultural Education 

Rural Social Science 

For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



FOUNTAIN PENS 

Moore's Swan's 

Waterman's 

Thirty-six dozen pens to select from. 

OUR RULE 



" Satisfaction guaranteed or 
money refunded." 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 




AND 

CARPET ROOMS 

E. D. MARSH ESTATE 



"15F COX SONS 
IIPPS* V I N I N G 

7*74 Madison Avenue, New York 

CAPS AND GOWNS 

Best Materials and Workmanship 

WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

17 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



Associate Alumni, 

Joint Committee on Intercollegiate Athlctu It, 

M. A. C. Athletic Fie'd Association, 

The College Senate, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association^ 

Hockey Association. 

Tc^Asl>s**UOtJ,» "^ n 

KTP- M 

A swo e i n tlf m . 
Nineteen Bundled Fifteen Index, 
Nineteen Hundred Sixteen Index, 
M. A. C. Christian Association, 
M. A. C. Catholic Club, 
Fraternity Conference, 
Stockbridge Club, 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



C. A. Peters, Secretary 

(J. II Chapmau, Secretary 

C. S. Hicks, Treasurer 

E. Towne, Piesideut 

C. E. Moses, Manager 

S. Prouty, Manager 

K. F. Clark. Manager 

K. S, Draper, Manager 

ger 

Dt 

Jfcg and Business Manager 

*¥. A. Anderson, Manager 

II. M. Rogers, Manager 

L. E. Fieldiug, Manager 

H. II. White, President 

.1. E. Harper, President 

F. W. Buell, President 

P. F. Whitmore, President 



IC-.TAHi.iaasi> 1MIH1 

Stkimikn Lank Folobh 

MANUfAlTIUHINU JKWBI.ISII 

IBO BROADWAY. NEW YORK 

CI.U1I AN1J QO&AJB9M 
1MNIS AND RINGS "* 

OOIJ>, BM.VIBR aim RWOWKIO mmi.a i ►. 



J— . U. Bishop, Mauag 
S ffjft** "• > Qfcn\ Preside 



BAHAR'S INN 

Northampton, Maa»achu**ll» 
TWO BLOCKS FROM THE DEPOT 

The hotel where there is comfort (with 

out extravagance.) More popular 

than ever. 

Special luncheon 12-2 P.M. 

PRIVATE DININC ROOMS 

A la Carte Service 
Frm* aJO «• it P.M. 



r litre an Saves fJood Rtasea**&9 yomhouid 

buy yout 



COAL 



or 



C. R. ELDER 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Stationery, Newspapers, 
Magazines and Col- 
lege Supplies 

A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer. 



The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Mt., alongside the 
famous Bloody Brook battle ground 
to Old I >eerliekl, thence to Green- 
field, Turners Falls and across the 
"Plains" to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 

90 Miles of Trackage node rn 
Equipment — Train Dispatch- 
ing System- Freight and Ex- 
press Service Over entire line. 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
Company 



CARS 



Leave AOOIE COLLEGE lor HOL- 
YOKE at IS mln. past the hour. 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST for AOOIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and $7 mln. past the hour. 

arm 



CUstdmly fr** 1 A. M. *• 4 A. M. 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of " Gold Medal Uniforms. " 



AMHERST It SUNDERLAND SI. BY. CO 

For a Daily and Sunday Newspaper 
You should Read 

THIS 

Springfield Republican 

While you are at college in Amherst. 
11 1.. 1- ait «r Th* m. a. o, »*»• 

The Beat «*|»i»rl Inn W»*i 
Full General "> • " • 

A Straws' K.li ti.rUl l'..K« 
Intr rout Ina; r>»t urra 

Itlaa 



1434-1426 Chestnut St. 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



/hiiiy, j cents -, 70 cent* a month ; $; 
a quarter. 

Sunday, % cents; 50 cents a quarter. 
Sabacribebr mail or through th« Amhwit IS't*»- 





MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXV. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, February 2, 1915. 



No. 17 



HARVARD HAS ADVANTAGE 
IN COMING HOCKEY GAME 



Loss of Ross Handicaps the Aggie 

Seven, Teams Otherwise 

Evenly Matched. 

Tomorrow evening, the M. A. C. 
hockey team meets the strong Har- 
rafd team in the Boston Arena. A 
comparison of scores gives Harvard 
a slight advantage over the Massa- 
.•husetts team, and the ineligibility 
of Ross is another factor which will 
work to the advantage of the Har- 
vard team. However, the hard game 
of last year in which Harvard won 
over M. A. C 4-3 in a 10 minute 
overtime game will serve to put Har- 
vard on her guard. 




DARTMOUTH OUTING CLUB 

WINTER CARNIVAL 

To be Along Intercollegiate Contest 
Lines. This College Invi- 
ted to Attend. 

The Dartmouth Outing club has 
planned a winter carnival similar to 
that held the two proceeding years, 
which will take place this year on 
Feb. 12. 

ft is purposed to have as many 
colleges as possible represented in 
this meet and to make it an intercol- 
legiate affair, the first of its kind, 
and if the idea seems feasible an 
organization will be formed. This 
college has been cordially invited to 
Mild a team. 

The events that are open to college 
men other than those at Dartmouth 
are as follows: 

Friday afternoon, Feb. 12. 
i Ski cross eoiiutv run 2 1-2 miles. 
I Kttowshoe cross OOUnty run ',1 miles. 
I . . nfteruoon. Feb. 13. 

ski Dash, loo and '2*20 yard*. • 
' SumwhIioc Dash. 1 (Hi and 220 yards, 
intercollegiate ski jump. 



AGRICULTURAL COMMITTEE i SPRINGFIELD FAILS TO TIE 
SHOWN NEEDS OF COLLEGE SCORE IN SECOND PERIOD 



s 



On" uf lineup for Harvard game. 

I'p to last week M. A. C. was 
•usidered to have an even chance 
with Harvard, as both the above- 
mentioned teams lost to Durtmouth 
a l-*2 seoie. Since then, Hnr- 
inl lias been coming fast and hei 
ictotf over Vfllc by I 4-8 score in 
the Arena on Jan. .'50, Yale having 
lefeatcd Massachusetts *»-2, it gives 
Iter a corresponding advantage. 
However, Massachusetts easily 
defeated M. I. T. 2-fl, white Yale 
had a hard lime defeating the Tech 
nen in an overtime period, which 
funds to even up matters. 

I Ot pag* 1| 



BOSTON ALUMNI DINNER 

A RKKINI'KKTO SIW 1M.I \M» SMI MSI. 

The annual dinner of the Mnssa- 
cbnoetts alumni club will he held on 
Friday, Fell, ,'j, at the Ameiican 
bouse, Boston. 

The Massachusetts club is the oili- 
est and largest alumni club of the 
college and the annual dinner draws 
loval Aggie alumni from all over 
New l-.uglnud. Only las! week, S. 
S. Warner '73 of Northampton, said 
to the secretary : M We always plan 
to get to the Boston dinner when 
possible and I guess it will he DOS* 
si hie this year." 

President Butterfield and Kx-State- 
Treasurer Klmer A. Mevens and pos- 
sibly a number of trustees will lie 
mn guests; the college ipmrtettc will 
lead the singing, 

Make vonr plans for the dinner— 
Heineinber the date, Feb 5 I 
P. W. Pick a no. Sec, 

4B (hathnm St.. Boetotl. 



At the last athletic board meeting 
the assistant managers of the varsity 
football and tennis were elected. 
For assistant managers of football ; 
It. W. Smith of iMtUfield and R. L. 
Holdeu of Haverhill. Assistant 
managers of tennis : N. Moorehoiise 
of Worcester and W, F. Rutter of 
| Lawrence, 



Joint Committee from Legislature In- 
spects Equipment and Work 
of the College. 

The joint committee on agriculture 
of the Massachusetts legislature 
appeared before the Btudent body at 
a voluntary assembly Thursday after- 
noon at h o'clock. President Butter- 
field in a few introductory remarks 
called the attention of the students to 
the importance of these annual visits, 
not only to give the committee a bet- 
ter chance to see the college, but also 
to give the studeuts an opportunity 
to learn what the committee is doing. 

Senator Cummings, Chairman of 
the Senate Committee on Agriculture, 
was the first speaker introduced, 
lie urged the students to make good 
use of their advantages here at col- 
lege, and this all the more strongly 
because he himself had been deprived 
of those very oppotlunities which the 
college now offers young men. Yet 
he admitted ttawt tltere was still gie?*t 
room for improvement in the matter 
of buildings even after the new Agri- 
cultural building shall have been com- 
pleted He advocated dormitories 
sufficient to accommodate all the alu- 
i h'n is and stud he wished he could 
serve on the committee until all the 
needs of the college could be supplied. 

Senator Kimball spoke a few words 
in praise of tbe college and told the 
students that the only way to succeed 
either in college or out, was to keep 
everlastingly at it. Her • in college 
Uicir chief business is to pet knowl- 
edge and also character, so that they 
may go out into the world prepared 
to be somebody. 

Representative Gauss ssid he 
noticed tbe great changes which have 
taken place since he was here in 1900, 
but felt that it still kept tbe diameter 
of a typical state institution. To 
this college, more than to any otter 
in the state, the men come from all 
towns in tbe commonwealth, both 
huge and small, fired with tbe deter- 
mination to accomplish something, 
This one fact alone is enough to 
justify the outlay which the college 
necessitates 

Representative (hap man, chair- 
man of tbe House Committee on 
Agriculture and Master of tbe stale 
grange told the students that what 
counts most la not education hut an 
ambition to be good citizens, Tbe 

[Cootiatmd on pagssj 



Aggie's Four Goals All Made in First 

Half, Springfield Comes Back with 

Three in Secoad Period. 

After two weeks respite, the var- 
sity hockey team met and defeated 
Springfield Training school on the 
Campus Fond, Varsity Uink, by a 
score of l-:>. The team showed the 
effects of lack of practise during the 
week of semester finals, but never- 
theless easily outskated and out- 
played their Springfield opponents. 
The loss of "Bud" Ross, due to 
scholastic ineligibility is a blow to 
the defense, coming as it does before 
tbe Harvard and Dartmouth games. 
Wiidon *16 seems likely to fill thc 
positiou of point, as be put up a 
good game Saturday. 

The Massachusetts goals were all 
secured in the first balf, and were 
wail earned, bqing the result of very 
ihver team work on the part of tbe 
forwar. "'it play ot tbe Massa- 

u_rmnttn I an much '-ster dur- 

ing the first than the second balf. 
During the second half the Springfield 
team made several nice rallies but 
were unable to ovei -come the lead. 
The excess of water and poor con- 
dition of tbe ice on the west side of 
the rink stowed up the game consid- 
erably, and the diving contests in- 
dulged in by several Springfield men 
furnished considerable merriment for 
the spectators. Wooley and Cbis- 
holm starred for M. A. C. and Pat- 
terson of S. T. S. furnish the test 
defense work of tbe game. 

The game opened with a rush, the 
Aggie team sweeping S. T. 8. off 
their feel. Wooley was on tbe job 
as usual, and in a little over a min- 
ute after the whistle started the game, 
look a pass from Fcrnald and poked 
the puck in for the initial score of 
the game. The puck was In the 
Springfield territory most of this 
period, and clever work on the part 
of the Springfield goal tend prevent. I 
a larger score. Fernald and John- 
son got away with the puck two min- 
utes later and Fernald scored on a 
pass from Johnson, The third goal 
was a result of the prettiest passing 
Jseen this season. The Fernald- 
Cbisbolm combination taking lbs 
i puck down tbe ice, and tbe latter 
\ snapped It by the Springfield goal- 
tend. M. A. C*s, fourth and last 
goal came after fourteen minutes ,,f 
I plus . when Cbisbolm again caged the 









The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Feb. 2, 191 5. 






puck on a pretty shot. 

Springfield woke up at this period 
of the game and Hunker eluded But- 
trisk a minute later, tallying the 
Physical Director's first goal. Tal- 
bot of Springfield scored a minute 
later on a lucky shot ending the scor- 
ing of the first period. Score, 4-2. 

The only goal of the second period 
came as a result of lax defense on 
the Massachusetts side and was scored 
by Smith after two and a half min- 
utes of play. The second half was 
slower than the first, with the puck 
see-sawing from one end of the rink 
to the other. The final score. Mas- 
sachusetts 4. S. T. S. 3. 

Line-up : 

M. A. C. S. T. S. 

Wooley, lw Iw, Jenkins 

Chisholm, c c, Bunker 

Johnson, r r, Talbot 

Fernald. rw rw, Smith 

Wildon (Sanderson) p p, Peterson (Capt.) 
Archibald, capt. (cp) cp, Wilson 

Kuttrick, g g, Magill 

Referee:— Goodrich of Amherst Col- 
lege. Timers : — Curran and Hill of M. 
A. C. Goal judges— Dole and Price of 
M. A. C. Time— 1-20 min. i 15 min. 
period. Penalties— Peterson of Spring- 
field, 1 minute; Wooley of M. A. C. 1, 
minute. Goals — Wooley, l-'ernald, 
Chisholm 2, Hunker, Talbot, Smith. At- 
tendance — 300. 



WEDNESDAY ASSEMBLY 

Wednesday assembly on Jan. 20th 
was addressed by W. P. Landers of 
Boston representing the Massachu- 
setts Total Abstinence Society. 
Taking for his subject "The Treat- 
ment of Alcoholism," be ft«dd in pin 1 ! 
"Our first duty is to save the man- 
hood of the conutry. The vast sums 
of money spent every day for drink 
do immeasurable harm, as our state 
records show. The abuse of alcohol 
is the direct or indirect cause of the 
commitment of 67 per cent of the 
prisoners in penal institutions, while 
i»6 per cent of the men in jails today 
are habitually intemperate. The 
fact that drink is the prime cause of 
poverty and many other social ills 
which affect our civic life makes it 
trulv the "great American menace." 
What is needed most to combat the 
evils of alcohol is self-control. Any 
young man who feels the need of a 
stimulant when he is normally strong 
without it repudiates his own youth. 
The great interest in the present 
war is because it is killing off the 
best blood of the nations. We must 
then wake up to the fact that we too 
are killing off some of the best of 
our youth through the abuse of 
:dcobol. I'nless we are able to see 
our condition we are simply mort- 
gaging our future. These times 
make new demands for abstinence 
and self-control. Those in authority 
in Europe already recognize the im- 
portant part played by nlcohol. The 
Czar has forbidden the sale of 
vodka; the Kaiser says the side 
which drinks the least will win ; 
Lord Kitchener orders his men to 
leave wine alone. All these men 
realize that the drinking soldier is 
more susceptible t© disease sod ex- 



posure, and is less efficient in every 

way. 

In business also the way of the 
drinker is harder every year. The 
great railroads and steel mills are 
forbidding their men to drink be- 
cause it means fewer accidents. 
Connie Mack, the great baseball 
trainer, spends no time with recruits 
who drink, for he knows that they 
can never become efficient at the 
game. Not only baseball players, 
but all other really good athletes 
must abstain from the use of 
intoxicants. 

In order to be of any help i;i the 
campaign against alcohol we must 
have compassiou on the unfortunate, 
combined with the element of service. 
M:»ny a man who is broken by drink 
needs only the help of some 'big 
brother* to bring him back to self- 
respect. This problem should appeal 
to us as citizens, whether of the 
cities or the country districts, for 
the drink problem touches the rural 
community as surely as the metro- 
politan center. Mary Antin has said 
that liberty is not won as long as any 
human being is liable to become the 
victim of drink. The only safety 
stop from drink is 'don't.' Total 
abstinence commends itself to us 
as the best policy for consistent 
citizenship." 



THE WORK O F THE EXTE NSION SERVICE 

Outlined by Director Hurd Before the Agricultural Committee. 
Rapid Increase in Utility of the Department 



AGRICULTURAL COMMITTEE 
VISITS COLLEGE 

fContinued from page t] 



old cry used to be. Go West, but 
young men are not going west now. 
They lind their greatest opportunities 
back on the old New England farms. 
It is up to the graduates of this col- 
lege to go back to their home com- 
munities and set a good example to 
the people who have not had their 
advantages. The people of the small 
towns are realizing as uever before 
the importance of the agricultural col- 
lege in remodeling their community 
life and giving a new impetus to agri- 
culture throughout the state. People 
who never make enemies are usually 
those who never do anything. In 
college is the time to learn to be a 
good loser, for it is the rubbing up 
against other meu which makes for 
strength and manhood. 



HARVARD HOCKEY GAME 

[Continued from page 1] 



Harvard is out to win the Aggie 
game, and will put her strongest 
lineup on the ice. Phillips— who 
starred in the Yale game— scoring 
three points, will be faster than ever, 
as he has almost recovered from an 
injury received in the Princeton 
game. Tin- probable line-ups for 
Wednesday night will be 1 

HARVARD U- A - <-• 

Watiamaker, rw rw, Kernald 

Townsend, c 
Phillips, r 



c, Chisholm 
r, Johnson 
Curtis, l"w Iw, Wooley 

Claflio.cp cp, Archibald 

Doty, p P- Wildon 

Wylde, g 8. Hutirlck 

The game is called far H-l. r », at the 
Boston Arena. 



In his talk before the Legislative 
Committee on Agriculture Director 
Hurd outlined the work of the Exten- 
sion Service, and said in part: — "As 
you go about the college in the next 
two days you will not see any evi- 
dence of the Extension Service. It 
is not represented by land, stock, 
barns, laboratories, orchards, or other 
visible equipment, but by the work of 
men in the field. The Extension Ser- 
vice of this college is the whole insti- 
tution, every man in every depart- 
ment doing what he can to build up 
the rural life of the state. The 
growth of the work has been very 
rapid. Ten or fifteen years ago peo- 
ple interested in agriculture began to 
make so many calls on the teachers 
and research staff of the college that 
it became necessary to organize what 
is now the Extension Service* 
Twenty-two people besides clerical 
help are employed especially for this 
work, and practically every man con- 
nected with the institution takes some 
part in extension work during the 
year. 

The short courses, for administra- 
tive purposes, are placed under the 
direction of the Extension Service, 
but the teaching is done by the regu- 
lar departments in the college. 

They are divided into the winter 
schools and the summer schools. 
Last winter in our Ten Weeks' 
Courses, Farmers' Week, Apple 
Packing school. School for Tree War- 
dens, Polish Farmers' Day, and the 
Conference for County Agricultural 
Agents and high school instructors 
in agriculture, 1934 people were 
registered. In the summer school of 
agriculture aud country life, the 
school for rural social service, the 
boys' agricultural camps, the poultry 
convention, and the conference of 
rural community planning, there were 
1130 enrolled, making a total of 3065 
who registered in short courses at the 
college during the last year. 

■•The extension work proper, or 
that which is carried on away from 
the college, is of course by far the 
larger activity. 

"We are conducting eighteen cor- 
respondence courses in agriculture 
"and home economics in which there 
was a registration last year of 1084. 
There were 115 lectures given at 
fairs, 517 in our extension schools, 
and 101)7 miscellaneous lectures* 
reaching a total attendance of 80,432 
last year. Thirteen lectors courses 
were arranged by communities during 
the year, and in these fii) lectures were 
given. 

"Our five-day extension schools, in 
which we sent a corps of three men 
and two women to a community for 
five days* systematic instruction, are 
probably the best pieces of extension 



work that we do away from the 
college. 

"We are doing a great deal to 
build up the dairy industry in the 
state. There are four dairy improve- 
ment associations under our direction 
with 1500 cows under test. Fourteen 
stock judging contests for boys, in 
which 232 competed, were held during 
the last year in connection with the 
agricultural fairs. By means of milk 
shows and other demonstration 
methods we are trying to give instruc 
tion which will help to promote the 
marketing of clean, safe milk. 

•'We are also giving large numbers 
of demonstrations of the pruning and 
spraying of orchard trees and the 
packing of fruit. 

"We make educational exhibits at 
the principal fairs of the state, giving 
four to five practical lectures and 
demonstrations each day. We have 
organized and assisted in the manage- 
ment of corn, dairy, fruit, and poultry 
shows, clean milk campaigns, and 
other activities of a similar nature. 
"One of our best and most far 
reaching pieces of work is the boys' 
and girls' club work, which last year 
was organized in 269 towns with a 
membership of 42,444. These clubs 
cover home and school garden, corn, 
potato, poultry, home economics, 
canning, and other lines. Substan- 
tial prizes are offered those who show 
the most ability in this work. 

"Two hundred and forty-eight 
former students of our college are 
organized into what is known as the 
M . A* C. Improvement Association 
and have pledged themselves in a co- 
operative effort to grow better seed 
corn and better strains of potatoes for 
the state. Later on other lines of 
work will be taken up. 

"We furnish traveling libraries to 
small towns. Last year 42 libraries 
applied and received the books for n 
period of from two to eight weeks' 
time each. 

"In order to reach some of the 
towns which are remote from tran^ 
portation facilities, for the past two 
years we have been operating a 
demonstration auto track equipped 
with pruning tools, spraying apparn 
tus, dairy testing machinery, books, 
pamphlets, etc., in charge of a com- 
petent instructor who has visited 
towns and individuals giving demon- 
strations of bettor agricultural prac- 
tices. Last year the demonstrator 
conducted work in 79 towns, made 
828 farm visits, and did a good deal 
of other work. 

"Co-operative organizations for the 
purchase and sale of agricultural 
commodities have been organized in 
seven communities. Surveys to 
study the distribution of milk have 
been made in six towns and cities. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Feb. 2, 191 5. 



"Farm records, to show cost and 
profits in the various lines of farming 
and labor income, have been made on 
i">0 farms. - Forty-nine top dressings 
of grass plots and forty-two alfalfa 
plots have been placed in various sec- 
tions of the state. 

"Seventy-five towns have applied 
to us for aid in laying out commons, 
recreation and play grounds, church 
grounds, cemeteries, and parks. 
Such plans have been prepared for 
thirty towns in fifteen of which the 
construction has actually been begun 
to carry out the work. 

"Everyone realizes how great the 
poultry industry is in this state, and 
yet we have met very few of the calls 
that have been made upon us for 
assistance in tne construction of 
poultry houses, the breeding, feeding 
and management of poultry, incuba- 
tion, brooding, and marketing of the 
products. 

•During the year we published 
through the Extension Service sixty 
publications, the total number of 
copies amounting to 27,479. 

"We began a little over a year ago 
to do extension work for women and 
it is proving to be one of the most 
important lines of work that we have 
ever attempted. We are giving in- 
struction in cooking, sanitation, labor 
saving devices, and other lines of 
work. 

"Hundreds of individual calls come 
every year, and something more than 
20,000 letters have been sent out from 
the central office during the year. 
We reached directly through the 
I-. x tension Service last year more than 
300,000 people. 

"I do not want to leave the impres- 
sion with yon that we are doing all of 
this work ourselves, for we are not. 
We have enlisted the interest and 00* 
operation of the United States Depart- 
mest of Agriculture at Washington, 
which conducts whatever work it 
desires to carry on in this state 
through the college. We cooperate 
with the State Board of Education 
through the county schools of agricul- 
ture and the departments of agricul- 
ture in high schools. We are assist- 
ing in every way possible to organize 
and help direct the work of the county 
agricultural agents and farm bureaus. 
Phis work is developing rapidly. Up 
to two months ago Hampden county 
was the only county organized in this 
Mate. Now Hampshire, Franklin, 
Worcester, Plymouth, and Barnstable 
live all organized ami engaged men. 
I H»tex. Suffolk, Middlesex and Nor- 
folk are in process of organizing and 
* II probably be fully organized with- 
in a month. This farm bureau and 
county agent work will probably do 
more for the productive side of fann- 
1: - than any other movement that has 
been started. 

• We believe that it is just as possi- 
I to develop sane, systematic and 
(I unified instruction for the people of 
the state as it is to do this in college 
I rooms. It Is different kind of 
" "ik : it requires men of special Gain- 



ing and special temperament. In 
developing this extension work the 
college is trying to fulfill its duty as 
a state institution to the people of the 
state by trying to make Itself a public 
service institution in its special field 
of work, and in doing this the college 
carries out to the letter the intense of 
the Morrill Land Grant Act of 18G2 
and of its two famous advocates Mr. 
Lincoln and Mr Morrill, — the giving 
of a liberal and practical education to 
the industrial classes in the several 
pursuits of life." 



RELAY RACE 

Massachusetts just managed to 
nose out Tufts at the finish of their 
annual relay race at the Coast Artil- 
lery in Boston and won by a scant 
two yards. This victory ties the 
series between the two colleges, as M. 
A. C. won in 1912 while Tufts was 
victorious in the two intervening 
years. 

The first of the Intercollegiate 
Relay Races was Tufts vs. M. A. C. 
which Mostrom started by getting the 
jump on his man. He ran a heady 
race and finished 8 yards in the lead. 
However, owing to faulty tagging, the 
lead was lost and Pratt took up the 
burden at the heels of the Tufts man. 
He gained steadily on his Medford 
opponent but finished eight yards 
behind him when he touched Russel. 
The latter gained 5 yards ou his man 
and handed the race over to Sturte- 
\ an* who started 3 ynads behind Staf- 
ford, the speediest of the Tufts quar- 
tet. 'Skinny' stuck to the heels of 
his fast opponent until the last quar- 
ter of the last lap when, by a remark- 
able burst of speed, he broke the tape 
two yards in advance of his man. 
The time of the race was 2 minutes 
and 39 3*5 seconds. 

This is the first engagement of the 
season for the relay team and the 
prospects of a successful season are 
bright. The team is already making 
faster time than at a corresponding 
time last year. The next run is 
against Worcester P. I. at the B. A. 
A. Meet at Boston Feb. 6th. The 
time of W. P. I. vs. New Hampshire 
State college which the Worcester col- 
lege won, was one second slower than 
the M. A. C. team. 



Important Notice 



On Gents' Furnishings, 
Overcoats and Suits 

8000S SOU AT M PER CENT DISCOUNT 

All l«te»t good* I rem tarn MMrtnwnt. 

Don't Miss Tbi.« Bargain Sale I 

You can also buy a few 
...Pressing Tickets on this discount... 

Clothe* called for and delimad. 



DR. R. C. 

Dentist 

NASH'S BLOCK 

Evenings by Appointment. 



ftoici Ularren 

South Deerfield, Mass. 

T. «l. A HERN, MANAGER 



I 



Let us help you to cut down your Prom expenses 

We can sell you 

A Full Dress Suit 

That is absolutely correct and that we fully guarantee 

For Thirty Dollars 

Made by Hart SchalTner & Marx. 



We have all the accessories* for full dress wear 

Gloves, $1.50 

Opera Hats, $5.00 

Scarfs, 50c to $3.00 

Shirts, $1.50 to $2.00 

Vests, $2.50 to $5.00 

Overcoats, $15 to $22 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



NOTICE I 

Twenty-flve cents will be put in a box for the 
NEW ATHLETIC FIELD every time you 
buy shoes at our store costing $3.50 or over. 

VERY LATRST STTLBS. 

Shoes for the Drill— $2.50 to $5.00 



hoe 



tore 



School and College Photographers . . . 




LOCALLY: 5« C«nt#f St., Northampton, Mass., 

and South Hadley, Mass. 

These Studios offer the best skilled 

artists and most complete 

equipment obtainable 



Main Opficr: 

1546-1548 Kroadway. 

New York City 




JACKSON & CUTLER 



l.M'. ROVIM 



-rmAUBRs ift- 



Ttteprwiw >w-W 



Dry and Fancy Goods and Choice Family Groceries 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Feb. 2, 1915- 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Feb. 2, 1915. 



15 



■ 



THE MASSACHUSETTS C0LLE6IAN 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

BOARD OF EDITORS 
FRANK W. BUELL M5, Editor-in-Chief 

TYl F.R S. ROGERS '16, Managing Editor 
HENRY H. WHITE '15, Assistant Editor 

JAMES A. PRICE'.;. Athletic Editor 

E SUMNER DRAPER 'i5. Athletic Editor 
THOS L, HARROr-KS'16. Department Editor 
ALFRED A. GIOIOSA'16, Campus Editor 
FRANK J. SCHEUFELE, Alumni Editor 

MILFORD R. LAWRENCE '.7, 

Associate Editor 

RICHARD W, SMITH '17, Associate Editor 



COMMUNICATION 



BUSINESS DEPARTMEHT. 

MAURICE J. CLOUGH 'i5. Business Manager 
CHAS A. HUNTINGTON. JR*i6, 

Assistant Business Manager 
W RICHARDSRARSM5. Advertising Man'g'r 
LESTER E. FIELDING '16. Ass't Adv. Mgr. 
BIRGER R. BOSEQUlST'iy. Circulation 

Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies. 5 cents. Make all orders payable 
to Maurice J. Clough. 



Entered »» eecond-ctose matter «t the Amher* 
Port Otltee. 

Vol. XXV. Tuesday. Fkb 2. No. 17 



Wams carnivals of intercollegiate 
caliber are an innovation in this part 
of the country lad the contest 
planned by the Dartmouth Outing 
club to be held in the near future at 
Ilunover is, therefore, especially 
worthy of note. 

With practically the same facili- 
ties for eujoying the energetic winter 
sports of snow shoeing and ski jump- 
ing as are at present at Dartmouth, 
this college has evidenced no interest 
in them other than u «icMy outdoor 
club that was formed several years 
ago but which has loug been laid to 
rest. Now there is a chance to start 
along this line with some enthusiasm. 
These sports arc healtliftil and enjoy- 
able and it seems certain that if such 
a club was really organized the Phys- 
ical education department would 
accept hours of work along this liue 
in place of basketball. 

Extracts from the letters received 
from Dartmouth read as follows: 
'•We are particularly anxious to have 
a few men fiom Massachusetts here 
for the affair" and "Tin cordial wish 
of Dartmouth i« that II. A. C he 
represented. " TlfeM quotations in 
themselves should have considerable 

force. 

Cannot some one with a live inter- 
est in the matter OOOpfed with some 
experience and knowledge of these 
two branches of sport organise such 
a club, and send two or three men to 
Hanover next week? It seems cer- 
tain that there in abundant muterial 
in college in the line of these sports 
if an opportunity to ibo* itself was 
but offered. If it is not considered 
advisable to send a team to toil car- 
nival and thus show that M. A. C is 
alive and can take up any sport as 
well as her sister colleges, let us do 
the next best thing sod organize a 
club that will in time produce men of 
intercollegiate ability. 



*13 —Albert F.Edminster, 14 Park 
Terrace, Cowallia, Ore. * taking "P. 
G." work to horticulture, 



(Communications to the Coi.t EG! an concern- 
ing matters of general interest are welcomed. 
The Collegian ts not to be held responsible 
for the opinions thus expressed.) 

Editor of the Mass. Coi.lkoian : 
Dear Sir: 
I noted recently with interest a 
communication from some Ex-man 
regarding the present system of final 
examinations in which he intimated 
that the system was responsible for 
much dishonesty employed by the 
the students, and suggested a modi- 
fication of the present plan of finals. 
Since I have had any knowledge of 
affairs at M. A. C. there has been 
but two men "stuck out" because of 
mental incapacity or the rigor of ex- 
aminations, and, furthermore, many 
of those habitually reported low in 
two or more subjects almost invariab- 
ly confessed when cross questioned, 
that a little more dilligent study 
might get them out of their "low 
estate." Attempted dishonesty, lack 
of application, ignorance of how to 
study or attempted combinations of 
7. r > per cent, frivolity and '2a per cent, 
study, however, has ruined many a 
likely student and future citizen. 

Many recent graduates have told 
me they considered the present sys- 
tem of final examinations very effec- 
tive and also necessary to maintain 
any respectable standard of scholar- 
ship whatever. There is no great 
satisfaction in graduating from an 
institution where it is easy to "get 
by." Neither do the last 500 alnmni 
want to pose as graduates of a college 
where requirements may 1m» lessened 
in order to stamp out "cribbing" or 
dishonesty. Ami again as an in- 
stitution supplied by the state of 
Massachusetts. M. A. 0. cannot con- 
sistently continue to graduate men 
wfcohftve not completed work up to 
collegiate standards and have them 
go forth into this commonwealth and 
others as a sample of her product. 

1 was not a Phi Kappa Phi man not- 
even approached that exalted station, 
noi did I have much sympathy for 
the "greasy grinds" but I always felt 
and I know I voice the sentiments of 
mam of the yonngcr alumni, "that 
Aggie's requirements and standards 
of scholarship are none too severe for 
college men with any "bones in 
their backs, or any genuine ideas of 
honest effort in their heads, or for 
men who desired to go out into the 
world equipped for any moderate de- 
degree of efficiency and achievement. 
Upon leaving college Kx-men or any 
other will not find requirements les- 
soned to stop their dishonesty and 
they will find much less consideration 
shown them if they try any "crib- 
ing" whether they count mouey for 
a livelyhood or shovel fertilizer. 

The expression of sentiment Is 
made not because of any fears of the 
faculty's changing the requirements 
but bee*we wa hate to see such 
warped arguments appear in the 
Cqlumhah as it goes around the 

state. 

Sincerely, 

Ilia "Crab." 



Perry '16 

CHOCOLATES FOR THE PROM 



-ORDER NOW 

Perry '16 

Alpha Sigma Phi House 



HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The REXALL Store on the Corner 



UNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

KKGITI.AK imMI SKRVICK AT 7 P M. 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest stock in the 
state outside of Boston. 



MODERN REPAIR DERT. 



E. RUSSELL NORTON E.M.BOLLES 



SALES A CENT 



Davenport Miller 
Vein Coal 

Best Quality Pennsylvania Coal 



THE SHOF.MAN 



E. E. MILLETT 

JEWELER and OPTOMETRIST 

Lenses ground while you wait 

College Jewelry 

Vtolin, Banjo, Mandolin and Guitar Strings 

AMHKKST, MASH. 
N**t to Post Office. 



BOSTON OFFICE 
85 Water St. 



NKW YORK OFFICE 

1 Broadway 



Amherst 

CO - OP LAUNDRY 

High-Grade College Work 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

CURRAN & DYER, Prop*. 

Loose- Leaf Note Books and Fountain 
— Pena— 



Shirts. 
Collars, 
Cuffs, - 
Plain wash. 
Same, rough dry, 



10-15C 

% I-2C 
S I-2C 

48c per doz. 
- 30c per dot. 



DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, $1.50 a Suit 

R.T. FnosT.Aftmt; D.SherihtaW, Asil. Agent 
Try our ticket system 

Put, full name and address on laundry 



Come to us for 



Fireplace Goods, Coat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils I WEBSTER'S STUDIO 



The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

I hbersof Wrought Iron and Brass Pipe, Valves 

ind Fittings for Steam, Water and Ga». Asbestos 

nid Magnesia Boiler and Pipe Coverings, Pipe 

nt to Sketch. Mill Supplies. Engineers and 

.nt factors for Steam and Hot Water Heating, 

\utomatic Sprinkler Systems, Boiler and Engine 

onnections. - • Holyoke, Mass. 



Reserved fox* 



BECKMAN 



llMllip I 



I.OW PRICE TAILORING CO. 

SUITS MADE TO ORDER 

its Cleaned. 1'ressed and Dyed. All kinds of 

impairing for Ladie* and Gentlemen neatly done. 

High-grade work by first class tailor. Work 

cilled for and delivered. Sell tickets for pressing, 

4 SUITS FOt %\ ,0 

GEORGE KOTOWITZ, Prop. 

M..in Street. Amherst. Mass. Nash Block 

On your way to the Host Office. Tel. 438- W 



FLEMING'S SHOE STORE 



Northampton 



For particular people 

THE ELMS RESTAURANT 

213 Main St., Northampton 

(Near Amheist car li nt? 1 



% Quality Restaurant at Moderate 
Prices. 

TRY OUR SPECIALS 

And a la carte service. 

OYSTERS STEAKS CHOPS 
FRIED CHICKEN, ETC 

Open 6 a. m. to 1 1 v. m. 

FLOWERS AND PLANTS 

< irown by the Floriculture! Dept . 

We offer our surplus stock of cut 
flowers and plants at reasonable rates 
to students and faculty. This stock 
is grown in modern houses under 
ideal conditions. Roses, carnations, 
violets, chrysanthemums and sweet 
peas in season. 

GROWN ON THE CAMPUS 

T. I. phone SOO 



Always glad to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 



Everything in Photography 

Including Framing 
(lood work speaks for Itself. 
Nash Block, Amherst, Mass. 



UNDERGRADUATES RESPOND 
FOR ALUMNI FIELD 

Once more the Athletic Field cam- 
paign reached a point where imme- 
diate financial assistance was neces- 
sary, and once more the student 
body, almost to a man, rose to the 
occasion, responding royally to the 
needs of the field. In all, a little 
over $1000 was pledged by the 
undergraduates. 

The students have clearly shown 
that they want the field ooth by moral 
and financial support. The juniors 
sacrificed their annual banquet, one 
of the biggest affairs of their college 
life, In order to turn money over to 
the field, thus adding over $100 to 
the fund. Other classes are also 
contemplating similar contributions. 
This wonderful spirit shown by the 
classes is only characteristic of the 
individual students themselves, who 
have "dug down" into their own 
pockets to make the field a complete 
reality. The Btudents have shown 
that they can produce the 'goods' 
which, although not sufficient in itself 
to complete the field, will serve as an 
inspiration to the alumni to contrib- 
ute generously for the biggest ath- 
letic boom the college has ever had. 

At the last meeting of the Athletic 
field committee, there was a deficit 
of $700 on last years construction. 
Furthermore, it was deemed neces- 
sary to build a fence around the 
graded field to protect it from indis- 
criminate use during the next sum- 
mer. It will cost approximately 
$2000 to completely enclose the field, 
but the money will be wisely spent 
when it is considered that it is being 
used for protection to everything 
that has been invested up to date on 
the land. At a recent mats meeting, 
Professor Htcks put the matter before 
the student body, and the four classes 
pledged on that date $1000 to settle 
the deficit ami to help fence in the 
field. 

The classes pledged as follows : 

No. pledged. No. in class. Total. Class. 

130 161 *499-5° I9»« 

9J 130 $104.00 1917 

71 in $ 160.50 1916 

64 »oi f'3950 1915 

since Jan. 1, $151 has been paid 
in by the students, as well as $107 
from the Junior banquet. During 
the same time, the alumni have con- 
tributed $350. This money together 
with the unpaid pledges will make 
the deficit on the fence abont $1000, 
The Athletic Field committee looks 
to the alumni to continue the pace set 
by the student body, and contribute 
enough to complete the fence. With- 
out a doubt, the Aggie spirit and 
loyalty shown by the undergraduates 
will not be found wanting Jn the 
alumni. 



The second series of the interclass 
relay races was run Wednesday after- 
noon, with the result that the seniors 
easily defeated the freshmen and the 
sophomores were victorious over the 
juniors. 



EXTRAORDINARY VALUES FOR THE PROM 

$6.50— Opera Hat— $4.00 

Just 10 left, so be on time 

NEW DRESS SUITS FOR RENT— 2 days' notice required 

Dress Gloves from $1.00 — Dress Ties from 25c— Dress Shirts from $1.50 

Dress Plaited Silk Front Shirt-Dress Vests from $2.00 

Overcoats to wear with Dress Suits from $10 

OUR FAMOUS AQUASCUTUM OVERCOATS ARE JUST THE THING 

Until February 15th— Dress Suits, made in our own workrooms, $30.00 

Sack Suit from $22.00 



— AT— 



CAMPION'S COLLEGE STORE 

Amherst 



M *.*a*±±£±l*»., „_ 



Hubbard's BasE Fertilizers 

the must economical you can use. 

BetteR crops 




'Utilize* 1 



are the inevitable result. 



THE ROGERS $ HUBBARD COMPANY, Middletown, Conn. 

Oate* Mud Work*, Poi l IhihI, Conn. 



year 



^\ J C* ft are supplied every 

Burpee s deeds direc v° "™^™«- 

JT can planters than are 

* the seeds of any other growers. Do you know Burpee- 
Quality "Seeds that Grow" ? If not, we would like to 
make your acquaintance. Simply send us your address 
(a postal card will do) and you will receive Burpee's 
Annual for 1914, — a bright new book of 182 pages, which 
is recognized as "The Leading American Seed Catalog." 
Kindly write to-day! Address 

W. ATLEE BURPEE & C0. y Burpee Buildings, Philadelphia 



F. A. SHERARD 

MEN'S STORE 



Use our new cash discount card 
and save five per cent on 

SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING 

Furnishings and Custom Tailoring 



C&rpfnttr & Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 



No. 1, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Man 



I 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Feb. 2, 1915. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Feb. 2, 1915. 



JORDAN MARSH COMPANY 

— — Boston 

TWO GREAT BUILDINGS— OVER 1,000,000 SQUARE FEET 
OF FLOOR SPACE— J69 SEPARATE SELLING SECTIONS. 

For Room Furnishings, Wearing Apparel, Unique and 
Practical Articles for Gifts— in fact each of the thousand 
and one things student life calls for— this store is the logi- 
cal shopping place for the college men of New England. 

Our Clothing and Furnishings Store is just a step from 
Summer Street. Do not fail to visit when you are in Boston. 
It is filled with just the kind of toggery young men like. 

All Purchases delivered FREE to Amherst. 
Mail Orders given prompt attention. 



THE 

Hoover & Smith Co. 

616 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 

Diamond Merchants 

Philadelphia's Official Fraternity Jeweler 

SPECIALISTS IN 

Fraternity Badges, Fobs, Novelties, 

Rings, Charms Priaes Trophies. 

Medals Coll6f« Pins, Fobs, Seals, 

Rings, Charms 



j S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Now at 13 Pleasant St, 
Oculists' Praecrtntfoas Filled. Broken Lenses 
Accurately Replaced. Une Watch Repairing 
Prom p tly and -killully Dune. 

Satutaction Guaranteed 



Batehelder & Snyder Co. 

PACKKits. ron.TKV MMOMaUM 

AND ISTtlN HAKKKS. 
WHOLESALE DIALERS IN 

Heel, Mutton. Lamb. Veal. Pork. Lard. Hmii, 

Bacon. Sausage*. Poultry. <i«me. Butter 

Cheese. P.RK*. Beans. 

Office • m iTM il.;;.i;,% >i & "J Hlack%tone St. 
R.Kton. Picking louse. Hrlahton. Mass. 
N'.ti/e Pm'trr Dressing Plant, Huston. 
Creameries in Vermont. 



" BIDE-A- WEE 



n 



Creamed Chicken and Waffles 

Oai bpsdakl — And other good lliiiii;^ to eat, 

MKS. L. m. STEBBINS, 

Middle Street, Hadley. Mass. 

Tel. 4ly\V 



E. B. DICKINSON,D.D.S. 

DENTAL ROOMS 

Williams Block, AtnhcrM, Mass 

Office Hoars: atous M.. i-*>lo$r. St. 



"SCOTTIE" 
H. HOOPEE 

Will clean and press your clothes so you 

will be satisfied. 1 1 costs no more 

and he is nearer to "Aggie." 

liukkai rscaat SYSTEM 

Under Columbia Cafe 



STKAM KITTING. Telephone JO-R 

GAS FITTING. I INNING. 

F. W. DANCE & CO.. Plumbers 

specialty of Repairing 

Church Wimmiws, Memorial 
Windows, I.kaii Lights. &c. 

• Clifton Ave.. AMHKRST. MASS. 



THB TERI'BY i»At*I^OI« 

I leatialnc frrnoltig K.pnlrlni: 

{JnlekoBt Aervlrr. Heat Work, Lowest Prlc* 

All wolk carefully done Work called for and 
delivered, fients' overcoats, suits, pants and 
coats. Ladies' rtne linen suits a specialty. 
Teams will call every day at M , A. C. 

WM. FKANKMN. Prop. 

Rear Nash Bl'k. Amherst. Tel. No. V»»-4 



Huntington Ave., Exeter and Biagden Sts., Boston, Mass. 
Headquarters for College Men when in the city. 

AMOS M. WHIPPLE, prop. 



Now is the time to be planning for 

Fraternity Groups 

Have them taken at 

MISS McCLISLLAN'S STUDIO 

44 State Street, * Northampton, Mass, 



SUNDAY CHAPEL 
Rev. Fleming James of the St. 
Paul's Church, Knglewoocl, N. J., 
gtive a fine serinonln Sunday Chapel, 
.Ian 24, taking for his text ' Thy 
God, thy Glory.' His fine command 
of KngliMii and sincerity of manner 
sent his message home to all. In 
part he said : 

Thy God, Thy glory,— What an 
excellent watchword for all our 
lives ! We require thU enlightment 
when d r.H penult- nt ; we need a prophet 
to give us encouragement with these 
words. Seeing God through the 
works of prophets like I^ougfcllow 
raises us far above the plane of sin. 
The emphasis rests with the word 
'glory' which is not something super- 
ficial and beautiful but that which 
brings vitality and vigor to life and 
inspiration for moral achievment. It 
is those men who are instilled with 
the glory of God who accomplish 
great and glorious tasks, for God is 
their guiding light. 

DARTMOUTH AT AMHERST 
SATURDAY 

On Saturday, Feb. r,, the M. A. C. 
hockey team meets the Dartmouth 
men. The Daitinouth team comes 
to Amherst with an unbeatable record 
having won every game this season 
with an American college team. The 
Hanoverians defeated the Massachu- 
setts seven in the Ik>ston Arena earlier 
in the season by the score of 4 to I in 
n close and well contested game. 
The game Saturday will he hard 
fought from beginning to end as the 
Aggie hockey team is out to win and to 
break the record of the probable inter- 
collegiate champions. The game will 
be called at MO. It is not definitely 
decided as yet whether the game will 
be played at Pratt rink or on tits 
campus. 

*13.— Harold Lyon now at Bnseej 
institute, home address, 392 Broad- 
wuv, Winter Hill. 



N1NETEEN-THIRTEEN NOTES 

''Make it a point, 1913, to be pres- 
ent at the Boston banquet next week. 
'Joe' Macone is going to be the big 
booster for '13, hunt him up when 
you hit the American house and start 
something." 

Benjamin W. Ellis has been ap- 
pointed extension instructor in farm 
management here at college. He 
will be the assistant state leader and 
have supervision of the county work 
done under the direction of the 
United States department of agricul- 
ture and the college. 

"Bob" Parsons ex-M3, Mass Insti- 
tute of Technology 1914, chemist 
and bacteriologist for the North Pub- 
ic Health Bureau in New York City, 
address, 215 West 23d St. 

See to it boys that "1913" is well 
represented at the Boston feedFeb.5. 
Bernard J. Kelley, with Mass. 
Agricultural college experiment sta- 
tion, home address, Harwich Port. 
Leon W. Kverson, ex-' 13, gradu- 
ated from Tufts Dental college last 
June and is now practicing in Nor- 
way, Me. 

Henry Edward Gooduough ex-*13, 
appraiser and estimator for Fiske 
Rubber Co., Chicopee Falls, home 
address,166 State Street, Springfield. 
Russell C Harrington ex-'13, book- 
keeper with Atlantic Coal Co. of 
Massachusetts, address 35 City 
Squsre, Taunton. 

Cheater B. Heath ex-'13, tree 
expert for the Walker & Castle For- 
estry Co., address, Y. M. C. A.. 
Springfield. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 
H.J. Baker Ml baa resigned his 
position with the Extension Service 
as Director of Farm Management It) 
accept the office of Director of the 
Experiment Station at the < onnecti 
cut Agricultural College. Mr. Baker 
served as secretary to Dr. Brooks of 
the Experiment Station and was then 
put in charge of farm management 
and demonstration work. He was 
also Assistant State Leader of the 
Cooperation Work carried on by the 
state with the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture. Through his 
winning personality and knowledge 
of the subject with which he was con- 
nected, he succeeded in gaining the 
confidence and respect of the fanners 
in the state. Although he will be * 
decided loss to the Extension Service 
it ii a credit both to himself and the 
college that he should receive a posi- 
tion such importance. 

B. W. Ellis '13 has been promoted 
to take Mr. Baker's place in the Ex- 
tension Service. He was formerly 
connected with Farm Demonstration 
work. 

At the recent meeting of the Mass- 
achusetts Fruit Growers association 
at Worcester the nsoal number of 
"old grnds." was present and groin * 
of younger alumni were noticeable 
about the hall. Let the good work 
go on till we get all Aggie men Inter- 
ested is fruit into the association. 



Work on the new agricultural build- 
ing, is proceeding under the able di- 
rection of the Casper Ranger Con- 
struction company as fast as the 
weather will permit. While the con- 
tract does not call for completion of 
the edifice until the first of August, 
work on the auditorium is being 
rushed so that it will be ready for the 
commencement exercises in June. At 
i he present time there are 75 men at 
work and as soon as warm weather 
nines this number will be increased. 



5 



foi roin hi k 

Beautiful College Pennants V 



YALE and HARVARD, 

Each 9 in. x 24 in. 

PRINCETON, CORNELL, 
MICHIGAN, 

Each 7 in. x 31 in, 

1 Pennants, Size 12 x 30-4 

Any Leading Colleges of 

Your Selection 

All of our best quality, in their 
proper colors, with colored emblems. 

Either assortment, for limited time, 
sent postpaid for 50 cents and five 
stamps to cover shipping costs. 

Write us for prices before placing 
orders for felt novelties of all kinds. 

The (lem City Novelty Co., 

40a Bittner Street, 
Dayton, - - Ohio. 



J* GINSBURG 

II 11 Amity Street 

Modern Shoe Repairing 

ANNOUNCING 

75C Special Half Sole, Rubber 754, 

wim-aiwim; 

Black, Tan, White Work Guaranteed. 

I'wu 1 s 
Kubber Soles . 
Kubber Soles, with Heels 

Holes Sewed, 



• 1.50 

• 1.75 

70r 



SS Shines Car 81 .00 



See and try a 

§1 LAVAL 

Cream Separator 

you can't afford to take any chances 
' when buying a cream separator. 

U U important that you get a ma- 
chine which will stand constant wear 
twice a day for many years to come. 

It is important that you get a ma- 
chine that will run easy and be easy 
to wash and dean. 

It is vitally important that you get 
•<• machine which will save all of your 
cream instead of losing enough in a 
year to amount to 
more than Its cost 

We know that if 
you see and try a 

De Laval, the 
chances are ten to 
one you will buy it. 
It's its own best 
salesman. 

THE DE U1MI SEPARATOR CO. 




Broadway 



to B. Madison St. 

CHICAGO 



ALUMNI NOTES 

MASS. AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE CLUB 
OF NEW YORK. OENERAI. ORDER NO. 3. 

Of course the victories over Colum- 
bia and West Point were inspirations 
to Massachusetts Aggies. Recent 
graduates will hear much about old 
time athletics at the hotel Martinique, 
Feb. 27. John A. Cutter, M. D., 
*82, 266 West 77th St., New York 
City. 

Last year the Associate Alumni 
offered a prize of $10.00 for the best 
sketch of an alumni pin. This has 
recently been awarded to Mr. Haiold 
Lyon '13. The opinion was unani- 
mous that the pin or button should 
represent the college seal. The idea 
which Mr. Lyon introduced was the 
possibility of using the class numer- 
als in connection with the seal. Mr. 
Lyon's sketch was exhibited under 
the number 74. 

Seven Aggie men met last Thurs- 
day night at the Ripley House, Con- 
cord, and started the organization of 
a Massachusetts Aggie Club of Con- 
cord. Heald and Dodge 1912 ; Bevan 
and Macone 1918; Anderson, R. K. 
Davis and Peterson 1914, were pres- 
ent and "Pete" writes that they bad 
one fine time. 

New York State College of Syra- 
cuse has just issued an attractive il- 
lustrated bulletin of 28 pages giving 
the results of the survey of Harry R. 
Francis '10, assistant professor of 
Landscape Exteution, covering his 
work in New York City. This deals 
with street trees, their planting, pro- 
tection and care. 

'91. — John B. Hull representative 
from Great Harrington reueutly bad 
a narrow escape from drowning in 
Lake Msnsfield while rescuing two 
little girls, who had broken through 
the thin ice while skating. 

•95.— H. W. Lewis has just re- 
turned from Venzuela where he has 
been in charge of railroad and dock 
construction of the Venzuela Sugar 
Co. for eight months past. The 
operation included the foundations 
for a new 800 ton mill. Mr. Lewis 
at his old home at Rockland during 
part of the winter and spent several 
days during the past week at the 
college. Address 230 West 22d St., 
New York City. 

*Ii,— Howard H.Wood, "Speedy," 
instead of being at the Entomology 
laboratory at Frederickton, New 
Brunswick is located as manager on a 
certified milk farm in Sooth Bay, which 
is about 30 minutes drive from St. 
John. 

'IS. — Raymond K. Clapp married 
Dee. 31, 1914 to Lois Klbertine Buck 
of Worthington, is now at home at 
37 Park Street, Florence. Miss 
Buck was a graduate of Mt. Holyoke 
college, class of 1914. Mr, Clapp is 
at present Agricultural Instructor 
and farm superintendent at Smith's 
Agricultural school, Northampton. 

"14.— Harold C. Black, has taken 
Op work in the landscape gardening 
department of William II Moon 
Company , of Philadelphia and Mor- 
ritvlUe, Pennyslvsnis. 



Che Pheasant 

Biruty> St., Bmbcrat 

Breakfast, Luncheon, 
Afternoon Tea. 

Dinner if arranged for. 
Telephone 470 

Rooms for Transients. 

^Teachers Exchange 




An Especially Uood Commission Proposition— 
Cashfoi tost orders ArtlcU wldsti Aovattistd 
Cut* down expense in power plants— Addirss 
Knuinkkrini; SurriA Co., tt$ N. oth street. 
Philadelphia. Pa. 



Of Boston 



IX Boyliton St. 



Recommends Teachers, Tutors and Schools 



* They're not short-lived 

The Jerseys 

In 1913 elehtrtn Jersey 
cows were officially tested 
which averaged 12 years 
and 7 inunilisoi ace. TheS 1 
average milk production 
was 8t!7 pounds. Average 
butter f I. #7 pounds. One 
of Hi.. <• cows was over 18 
years old. 

Longevity, fJbavrWatM r~! Economic 
Production arc Jers. y riai... Rustics. 

AMERICAN Jkt«K¥ CATTLE CLUB 

S2« W. 2Jd til., !ww York t lly 




I r *• Co.. BaifV 



.QaMSftNaw. 
St. ft 



Just the kind ol pen 

you like to use in class 

orin "exam"." Startsat 

a t njch — keelson writing 

smoothly ALL *be way and 

closes up bolt If ttgkt. The 

original "won leak" pen, 

you know. 127 s'\ Irs and 

sii?s from $2. r U|>. 

At iD Cof'tr- Q .*! i-.orw 
W- •■dalli.'* ieri 

iJlcot^writhk 




E. Frank Coe Fertilizers 

1 QCC7 THE BUSINESS FARMERS' STANDARD IQIyl 
lOJf FOR OVER FIFTY -FIVE YEARS 1 jH 

Do Yon Raise 300 Bushels of Potatoes per Acre? 

HREE hundred bushels per acre is 
not an unusual yield by any means, 
but did you get it this year ? 
Clf you were planning to raise 300 
bushels of potatoes to the acre how 
far apart would you space your rows? 

How far apart would you drop the seed pieces in 

the row? 

tJHow much fertilizer would vou use to grow 300 
bushels of potatoes per acre? How would you 
apply it ? 

•JAre you sure that your seed potatoes are true to 
name and true to type ? 

•JWhat are you doing to prevent "scab," and t arly 
and late blight ? 

QDid you have a short crop of potatoes because of 
dry weather ? Have you decided how you will 
.overcome this trouble in the future ? 

«JAII these p'acticsl points, and many more, are fully covered an our 
new book 



ft 



"Potatoes: A Money Crop 

which will be sent free to every potato grower woe requests a copy , and 
mentions this paper. 

•P his book ii written by a man who himself has bad years of experience as 
a potato grower, and who has made a careJul study of the best methods of 
other growers, 

•Jlf vou read this book you will keep it for future reference. It is a "worth 
while" publication 

The Coe-Mortimer Company 

81 CHAMBERS STREET, NEW YORK CITY 




\ 



8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Feb. 2, 1915. 



JOIN THE BUNCH AT 



EPSTEIN'S TAILORING PARLORS 

Now located over post otlicc. Up one Might 

Pressing and Cleaning a Specialty 

Liberal Ticket System Tel. 36-M 

SHOE STOKE 

Shoes Repaired by Machinery 

SHOE SHINE 

< >|>er» Sunday from 7-12. Un your way to P.O. 

The Highland Hotel 

Comer ol Hillman and Barnes Streets, three 
blocks from the Union Depot, is • modern hos- 
telry run on the European Plan, it is just a step 
from Main Street, away from the noise and dust 
and yet in the center of the business district. 

Its rooms are well furnished and comfortable, 
having a telephone and hot and cold running 
water in every room. Prices •! and up ; rooms 
with bath (single) 91.50 and up. 

Its excellent cuisine an.i well ventilated dining 
room makes a meal a pleasant memory— every- 
thing of the highest quality, well cooked and 
served in the best possible manner. 

Stay at the Highland Motel once and you will 
anticipate staying there again. Music every 
evening. 

D. H. SIEVERS, 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Offers courses of instruction in twenty-seventeaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairying 

Poultry Husbandry 



Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 

Agricultural Chemistry 



FOUNTAIN PENS 

Moore's Swans 

Waterman's 

Thirty-six dozen pens to select froi... 

OUR RULE 



HiKi1i.11.. 1 ii..t.-i. 



|priaftS*M. Man. 



sniEiTFiniriiE 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 

fi. D. MARSH ESTATE 



Economic Entomology 

Microbiology 

Plant Physiology and Pathology 

Agricultural Education 

Rural Social Science 

For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 

KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, PRESIDENT 
AMHERST. MASS. 



'Satisfaction guaranteed er 
money refunded." 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



Associate Alumni, 

Joint Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics, 
ML A. O. Athletic Fie'd Association, 
The College Senate, 



Stephen Lane Folgek 

MANUFAOTUKINIi JKVVKI.KK 

ISO BROADWAY, NEW YOHK 




Football Association, 

Baseball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Kilie club, 

Roister Doisters 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Fifteen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Sixteen Index, 



M. A. C. Christian Association, 
M. A. C. Catholic Club, 
Fraternity Conference, 
Stockbridge Club, 



C. A. Peters, Secretary 

G. H. Chapman, Secretary 

C. S. Hicks, Treasurer 

E. Towne, President 

C. E. Moses, Manager 

S. Prouty, Manager 

K. F. Clark, Mauager 

E. S. Draper, Manager 

H. Bishop, Manager 

R. M. Upton, President 

J. F. Nicholson, Producing and Business Manager 

F. A. Anderson, Manager 

H. M. Rogers, Manager 

L. E. Fielding, Manager 



CLUB AND COLLEGE 
PINS AND RINGS * 

ODIJ), ill vnR AND BHOlrtK M1DAIH 



H. H. White, President 

J. E. Harper, President 

F. W. Buell, President 

P. F, Whitmore, President 



RAHAB'S INN 

Northampton. M«M»chu»etU 
TWO BLOCKS FIIOH THE OHPOT 

The hotel where there is comfort (with 
out extravagance.) More popular 
than ever, 

Sp*ctal Luncheon 12 2 P. M. 

PRIVATE DINING ROOMS 

Ata Carte Service 

from 6 30 toll P. M. 



COX SONS 

— AND — 

^ VINING 

71-74 Madison Avenue. New York 

CAPS AND GOWNS 

Best Materials and Workmanship 

WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 

97 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



I her* are Seven Good Reasons why youshould 
buy your 



or 



C. R. ELDER 



Stationery, Newspapers, 
Magazines and Col- 
lege Supplies 

A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



The Connecticut Valley 

Street Railway 

From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatrields, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Mt. t alongside the 
famous Bloody Brook battle ground 
to Old Deerfield, thence to Green- 
Meld, Turners Falls and across the 
" Plains" to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and M tilers Falls. 

SO Miles of Trackage nodern 
t qutpment Train Dispatch- 
ing System -Freight and Ex- 
press Service over entire line. 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
Company 



CARS. 



Leave AOOIB COLLEOE for HOL- 
YOKE at IS mln. past the hour. 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST for AOOIE COL* 
LEO E at 7 «nd 37 mln. past the hour. 

IfitklCttirt 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 



M 



AMHERST & SUNDERLAND ST. fit CO 



Ctottd only from 1 A. M. to 4 *• **• 



For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product, 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of "Gold Medal Uniforms. " 
14*4-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa, 



For a Dally and Sunday Newspaper 
You should Read 

THB 

Springfield Republican 

While you are at college in Amherst. 

1 1 h»« nil of The M • A. C. Jfsws 

The Brtt Sporting Ksws 

Fall CNmaral Mews 

A Strong Editorial Pmg* 

la f i—tl nf NtifH 

It I • ■ SMI Newspaper 

Daily, 3 cents ; 70 cents a month ; U & 
a quarter. 

Sunday, $ cents; 50 cents a qaarter. 

Subscribe bf m»il or through tot AabaTtt •"' I 









MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEOE 



Vol. XXV. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, February 9. 1945. 



No. 18 



MASSACHUSETTS ALUMNI 
MEET AT BOSTON BANQUET 



Oua Hiiairai and Fdtaen Aggie Men 

Hold Very Successful Reunion 

and Dinner. 

Last Friday night, at the American 
house, Boston, the Alumni club of 
Massachusetts held their annual re- 
union and dinner, 1 Ifi Aggie men and 
guestB being present. 

The Springfield Itepubkun Bays 
conceruiug the dinner : "In quality 
and appearance this dinner ranks 
right up in front among the college 
dinners of the season." 

President Uuttertleld was the guest 
of honor and spoke in an optimistic 
tone of the prospects for the future 
of the college. He said that the leg- 
islature is to be asked this year for a 
total appropriation of $1,200,000 or 
1200,000 for six years, to cover 
liiiikiiugs and improvements and 
pointed out the great opportunities 
and respomvbi lities of Aggie men at 
a time when Midi a vast amount of 
money is being expended in the im- 
provement of agricultural education. 
W. H. Bowker 71, of the trustees, 
was toastmaster in the absence of 
the president of the club, H. L. 
White 'OIL President James II. Hus- 
Iih of the Boston & Maine railroad 
injected some little humor into his 
talk by proposing the establishment 
of buffet and observation car service 
from Boston to Amherst, President 
1 1 ust is in behalf of the trustees of 
the B & M. asked for the support of 
ill Aggie men in the work of teor- 
gsniiatsM of the road now under 
way. Kliner A. Stevens, ex-slate- 
ii< usurer stated that we in New Eng- 
land have the history, the toll and 
Hie brains, but we suffer from too 
much legislation to be able to attain 
y ui best agricultural development. 
'i David Snedden, state commis- 
'-,. I -tier of education; Ex-Trustee 
i 4 i-arles B. Ward ; Prof. Samuel 
iser of Genesee, N. Y. ; trustees 
nk A. Hosmer, Charles A. Glea- 
1, .1. P. Gannon and George II. 
lis; also spoke brieflly, and Pro- 
*or Hicks of the college was given 
\arm welcome bv the bovs when 
arose to make a brief report of the 
sent condition of the Athletic 
Id. Professor Hick pointed to 
* great sacrifices the student body 
a making in the interests of the 
Id and every alumnus present 
ist have felt the necessity of not 



1 

r •/ 

— a 



"HER HUSBAND'S WIFE" TO 

BE PROM PRODUCTION 



[Continued on page aj 



Successful Presentations of Roister 
Doisters Play Promise Good En- 
tertainment for Prom Quests. 

The annual Prom production of the 
dramatic society will be given this 
Saturday evening, Feb, 13th, at 8 
o'clock in the Amherst town hall. At 
this town the student body and faculty 
will have their first chance to see the 
Koister Doisters appear under their 
new organization. The society is to 
play "Her Hnsband's Wire" by A. 
E. Thomas, dramatic critic of the 
New York Sun. "Her Husband's 
Wife" is a novel, clever, witty, clean, 
und wholesome coined v that has to do 
with a young wife of hypochondria- 
clml tendencies who believes she is 
going to die. She decides to pick 
out her husband's second wife and 
the the complications start. The 
whole play is a satire on femininity 
**.*»d ir?n»»v now arid nov<d ide«i«. «->p 
this subject are very cleverly worked 
out by the author without stooping to 
the burlesque that h so common in a 
play of this type. Truly the follow- 
ing press notices speak for them- 
selves ; "Jammed full of laughter ami 
sparkling with bright dialogue" — tfoto 
York American. "One of the most 
entertaining American plays." — Aw 
York Sun. •'Written with a grace, 
smartness, and wit usually associated 
with the higher ranges of the drama." 
— Morton T run script . 

That the Koister Doisters are fully 
eompetaii t in their production of such 
a play is well evidenced by t he fact 
that in every case where the? have 
given a {performance of it they have 
been asked back whenever they 
decide to put on another play of its 
merits. In Paterson, New Jersev, 
the critics were very favorably im- 
pressed with the merits of the noting 
and Andrews as "Irene Randolph" 
the hypochrondriach was pro- 
nounced to be the best female imper- 
sonator that had ever appeared there 
in college or amateur dramatics. In 
Rockawav, an eminent theatrical 
man said that the work of Buckman 
'17 in the last act where be acquires a 
plain, old-fashioned drunk was the 
best lie had ever seen fay an amateur 
and he doubted if most professionals 
could handle such a delicate situation 
in snch a way as not to make it 
appear vulgar. The work of Wtlber 
'17 was especially commended. His 



[Continued on p«ft a I 



WASHINGTON ALUMNI HOLD 
TWELFTH REUNION BANQUET 

Prominent Alumni Discuss Condition 

and Needs of College. Dr. Peters 

Represents the Faculty. 

The twelfth annual banquet and 
reunion of the Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College club of Washington, 
D. C. was held at the New Khhitt 
hotel, Washington on Saturday even- 
ing Jan. 30. Aggie men from Penn- 
sylvania, Maryland, Virginia and 
the District of Columbia rallied to 
renew old acquaintances, make new 
ones and boost for old Ajzgie, and 
the occasion was a most enjoyable 
one. Dr. C A. Peters *'.»7. professor 
of Inorganic Chemistry, representing 
President Buttertleld, was the guest 
of the evening and aided iu making 
the occasion a memorable one. 

Dinner was served shortly after 
6-30 to which 1H ant down and did 
full Justice. It was well past 8-00 

***'?!»'*cfr lu»ff>".> fri» |>M«ii>«.4M of f|w* r»l||l» 

had been acted upon and Att'y H. S. 

Fail I >anks 'It.', of Philadelphia, acting 

as toastmaster, introduced Dr. 
Peters. Dr. Peters gave a most 
interesting account of the affairs at 
collage, noting especially some of the 
changes of the year, and general 
progress. He mentioned the plans 
for appropriations ami buildings and 
described the student activities. 
Special interest was aroused by hi* 
remarks on the work of the Asso- 
ciate Alumni — that which has been 
accomplished and plans for the 
future and particularly the bringing 
about of a closer relationship. He 
was asked especially as to the prog- 
ress on Alumni Field and the status 
of funds and much interest was 
developed in the undertaking, which 
it is felt so well deserves the support 
of the whole body of alumni. 

Judge Robert W. Lvman. professor 
of Ileal Property at Dickerson Col- 
lege Law School, Carlisle, Pa. and a 
member of the first class to graduate, 
spoke of the work of some of the 
earlier members of the faculty. He 
spoke of the deep interest that Dean 
Mills took in the alumni and said 
that he justly gloried in the name 
1 laddie, a name given by the stu- 
dents in response to the interest that 
he took in them. In speaking of the 
work of President Levi Stockbridge, 
Judge Lyman referred to him as 
"The best man God ever mads." 

Dr. R. W. Allen '86 responded to 



WORCESTER P. I. HOCKEY 
TEAM TO PLAY PROM GAME 



Boston College Cancelled Original En- 
gagement for Friday's Game 
Owing to Lack of Practice. 

Several changes in the hockey 
schedule have taken piece the past 
week. Due to lack of practise, Bos- 
ton college cancelled their date to 
play M. A. C. on the campus 00 Fri- 
day afternoon, Feb. 12, the Prom 
game. The Worcester Poly tech 
hockey team has been taken on for 
this game, and should prove an easy 
match for the Aggie team, though the 
Worcester seven is liable to pnt op a 
strong fight. The game will be 
played on the varsity rink at f-00 r. 
m , weather conditions permitting. 

it is to be regretted that the poor 
condition of the ice made it necessary 
t<> ( aucell the game with Dartmouth, 
scheduled on the campus for Feb. 6, 
and it is improbable that the two 
teancs wilt |> side to meet again the 
rest of the season. 

The second game with Springfield 
Y. M. C. A. college, postponed from 
Jan. 20, will brohaldy be played on 
Feb. 17 ut Springfield, as the team 
needs a game about that time to keep 
them in trim for the Williams game 
on Feb. f2, the last game of the 
season. 



THE RIFLE TEAM 

By winning from Iowa State Uni- 
versity with a score of 971 and 
shooting Ml against Washington 
state, the M. A. C. Rite Team has 
reached third place in the ranks of 
Class A. In the second shoot of the 
season during the week of Jan. 21 
the team lost 13 (joists to Washing - 
ington. Following this, however, 
the team slumped in the match with 
Cornell shooting Dfi.'L 

The results of the Iowa match 
were : 

M.A.C. 971 Iowa 9G4 

Individual record of the best five : 

Wetherbee, 195 

Mack. 195 

HotiH, 194 

Parmenter, 194 

Lane, 1 98 

The standing of the first three 
teams of clsss A is : 

Team. tmm, P» cent. Won.Lort. 

Washington 2935 98 2 1 

Michigan 2915 97 8 o 

M A. C. 2899 97 2 1 



'I 



[Continued as pSfS f | 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Feb. 9, 191 5. 



M, A. C. CLUB IN WASHINGTON 

[Continued from page 1] 



the toast, M M. A. C. Retrospect." 
The interest of all present was kind- 
led by his account of our Alma Mater 
as she was during the early eighties 
ami of the men who steered the col- 
lege through the storms that were 
then brewing. The student body was 
then small in numbers as was the fac- 
ulty but the college was rich in presi- 
dents four having filled that otlice 
from lNHl to IH80. In those days 
the appropriations were small, one of 
.< 1 < MX > dollars being as hard to obtain 
as is one bundled times that amount 
today- The equipment was limited 
and there were none of the agricul- 
tural departments as now organized. 
There were no textbooks of agricul- 
ture, and comparatively no agricul- 
tural literature as we look upon it 
today. Only oue or two experiment 
stations had been organized audit 
was not un til's.", that a small appro- 
priation was pi ovided for oue at the 
college. The attitude toward agri- 
cultural education, .'.specially on the 
part of the farmers, was very differ- 
ent from what it is now. The work 
of the experiment stations and the 
basis it has given for agricultural 
teachiug and extension has been 1 
great factor in the change. Now we 
have the greatest movement for teach- 
ing the farmers* by word and by dem- 
onstration that any people have ever 
sanctioned. Viewed iu the light of 
the past 80 years, imagination can- 
not picture what the next generation 
will bring forth for agiiculture. 

W. H. Beal of the U.S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, an honoraiy 
member of the club, responded to the 
toast, "Memoirs of Station Men and 
Work iu the Eighties. " He spoke of 
the four years in station work at 
Amheist, which he began in .January. 
1887 and of the dozen Off more men 
with whom he was intimately associ- 
ated in that work. The station had 
just been organized with Dr. Goess- 
man as its head, to whom Mr. Beal 
referred as a man not only of the 
eighties but of ill time, who had the 
power to inspire loyalty to scientific 
work, to scientific truth and whose 
rule was that the results obtained 
must be followed no matter where 
they led. These qualities account 
largely for the success attained by 
his men. The work of the station 
was pioneer work but it was also foun- 
dation work. 

"Our Tribute to Dean Mills": 
This might well have been placed as 
first on the program for nearly every 
speaker referred with feeling to the 
great loss suffered in the death of 
Professor Mills. Dr. S. W. Flstdwr 
':»<; for several years director of the 
Virginia Experiment Station, was 
the first to be called upon. He 
spoke of Professor Mills as having 
had a greater influence over the col- 
lege men of his day than any other 
111:1 n. He was struck with the great 
impartiality shown and the devotion 



to duty in the class room. "We 
loved him and saw his greatness and 
the noble qualities that endeared 
him to every one. Long after what 
he taught us has been forgotten we 
shall remember him as the man." 
H. L. Knight '02, author of the col- 
lege song, "Sons of Old Massachu- 
setts," also spoke of Professor Mills' 
work and his noble qualities. He 
mentioned the emphasis that was 
placed upon scholarship as opposed 
to book learning, and his constant 
efforts to develop character as well 
as culture. Mr. Knight suggested 
that if a general purpose recitation 
building is ever erected it might well 
bear Professor Mills name. 

A discussion of the "Four-Quar- 
ter System" was entered into by A. 
C. Monahan '00 of theU, S. Bureau 
of Education, K W. Morse ex-'94 of 
the Bureau of Animal Industry and 
G. A. Billings "J5 of the office of 
Faim Management. 

Nearly every speaker of the even- 
ing expressed his high appreciation 
of the work of President Butterfield 
and the far sighted and able policies 
that he is inaugurating, which are 
placing the college in the very front 
rank,. A letter of greeting and ap- 
preciation to the president was author- 
ized and a vote of thauks extended 
to Dr. Peters. The club voted to 
make an organized effort to aid in 
raising subscriptions among its mem- 
bers for the Athletic field and a gen- 
erous response is anticipated. It 
was decided to hold more frequent 
informal gatherings and a committee 
was appointed to take the matter in 
hand. It was decided to hold a 
meeting at the time the Association 
of ( >flieial Agricultural Chemists, of 
which an M. A. C. man is now 
presideut, are in session in November. 
Letters of regret were received 
from Presideut Daniel Willard ex-'s2 
of the Baltimore & Ohio railway, 
from Dr. C. H. Griffin '<>4, president 
of the club who moved during 
the year to Los Angeles, Cal M from 
K. W. Lamson '12, secoud vice-pres- 
ident of the club who was de- 
tained in Connecticut and from others. 
The officers elected for 1915 are: 
President, Robert W. Lyman '71 ; 
first vice-president, H, L. Knight '02 ; 
second vice-president, G. T. French 
'06 : secretary-treasurer, W. A. 
Hooker f9 ; choragus, O. B. Briggs 

Those present were Dr. C. II . 
Peters '97, W. H. Beal (Honorary), 
Prof. K. W. Lyman '71, Dr. K. W. 
Allen '«"», K. W. Morse ex-94, Att'y 
H. S. Fairbanks '95, G. A. Billings 
•yii, Dr. S. W. Fletcher '96, M. H. 
Pingree ''.>!», Dr. W. A. Hooker '99, 
A. 0. Monahan *00, H. L. Knight 
•02, G T. French '06, Carlton Bates 
ok, W. F. Turner '08, O. B. Briggs 
o;t. K.J. Fiake '10, and .J.K. Dudley 
ex-' 11. 

William A. Hookkr, I). V. M., '99. 
IH29 G St., N. W., 
Washington, D. C. 



INTERCLASS BASKETBALL 

The basketball games of Friday 
evening proved to be the most inter- 
esting of the series thus far. The 
feature game of the evening was pro- 
vided by the freshmen and sopho- 
mores, the former winning by the 
score of 13 to 12. The juniors were 
victorious over the seniors by the 
score of 27 to 15. 

The freshman-sophomore game 
started out like a battle and it was 
well along in the first half before the 
first basket was caged. The game 
was closely contested and very fast 
to the finish. For the sophomores 
Grayson was the one bright light. 
His dribbling was of high order and 
his all around work shone out above 
that of his team mates. Irving 
played a clever game in the forward 
line. 

The junior-senior game, while not 
as close as the other, was well fought. 
For the winners the work of Perry in 
the shooting line was of high class 
while Little warded off many at- 
tempts to score. For the seniors, 
Pike played his usual all around 
game. 

The summary : 



THE ROISTER DOISTERS 

[Continued from page i] 



NINETKKN SI XT KEN. 

Kd.G. F.G. 



I.ittle.rb 
Moses, lb 
ferry, c 
Darling, rf 
Hall, If 

Total, 



1 

o 
7 

3 

1 



o 
o 

3 
o 

o 



p. 

2 

o 

•7 
6 



12 



NINKTKKN-FJKTEKN. 
Fd.C. 



Frost, If 
Pike, rf 
Dole, c 
Melican, lb 
Fitzgerald, rb 
Total, 



r.Q. 

1 

o 
o 
o 
o 



*7 



change and transformation from the 
character of a "sad and dowdy old 
maid" to the character of a regular 
"bird of paradise" is very cleverly 
done. The part of John Belden, the 
good natured uncle pf the young wife 
is very well performed by Clark '16. 
This part was originally played in the 
New York production by Henry Mil- 
ler and offers an especially good 
chance for a display of good acting. 
Richard Belden, who makes matters 
worse by falling in love with "Her 
Husband's Wife," is very capably 
impersonated by Selkregg "16, and 
his love making in the last act has 
made him easily the matinee idol on 
all the trips the society haB made. 
Nora, the Irish maid of the Ran- 
dolph's, is played by Patterson '15 
with bis usual display of fun and 
good nature. 

All the work of coaching and pro- 
ducing the play has been done by the 
members of the society and no out- 
side assistance has been used. 
Nearly all the work of coaching has 
been done by Nicholson *16 and 
special mention should be given to 
the exceptionally fine work that he 
has done. The gowns worn by the 
women are the work of a noted Fifth 
avenue modiste and are certainly well 
carried and shown off by the men. 
Much time and money has been spent 
in turning out a finished production in 
erery way and the result has been, as 
the Ewning Mail expresses it "A 
bright and breezy comedy which 
every one should see." 



NtSETKEN-EIGHTEEN. 

Fd.G. F.G. 



Gasser, lb o 

Sedgewick, lb o 

K. Grayson, c 2 

Mawley, rf o 

Vickers, If 2 
Pt. for foul 

Total, 



o 
o 
o 
o 

4 



•5 

p. 
o 
o 

4 

o 
8 

1 



THE BOSTON BANQUET 

fContmued from page 1] 



2 4 

NINKTEKN-SEVENTEEN. 



Irving, If 
Squires, rf 
Haglestein, c 
E. Grayson, lb 
Mack, rb 

Total, 



Fd.G. 

1 
2 
o 
2 
o 



F.G. 
o 
1 
1 

o 
o 



'3 

P. 

2 

5 
1 

4 



5 



12 



SOPHOMORE ELECTION 

At a meeting held Wednesday 
afternoon the class of 1917 elected 
the following officers to serve during 
the second semester : 

President, Emory E. Grayson of 
Milford \ vice-president, Robert C. 
Westman of Roslindale ; secretary, 
Dana O. Merrill of Pepperell ; treas- 
urer, J. Dickson Birchard of Spring- 
field ; class captain, Louis W. Ross 
of Arlington; sergeant at arms, 
Philip L. Smith of Kingston. 

Miss Adeline L. Ferris of Ridge- 
field Park, N. J,, was elected per- 
manent class historian. 



only his co-operation and financial 
backing, but that of every other 
Aggie man. 

Besides the above speakers, the 
guests included trustees Elmer D. 
Howe, Arthor G. Pollard, Frank 
Gerrett, Senator Charles A. Kimball. 
Rep. A. C Dowse, Senate and House 
chairmen respectively of the Legisla - 
tive committee on agriculture, also 
Professors Lock wood, McLean, Peters 
and Rees of the faculty. 

The college quartet furnished 
special music and led the singing 
during the evening and this part of 
the program was acknowledged to be 
one of the features. "The River of 
Doubt" sung by Towne '15, with 
prominent mention of "Teddy" wa« 
especially appreciated. 

The new officers for 19 15-1 9 Hi 
are: President, H. C. Bliss '88 of 
Attleboro; secretary, P. W. Pickanl 
'11; treasurer, Franklin W. Da\ - 
*89 ; directors, R. B.Mackintosh '8<>, 
G, B. Willard *9f, H. W. Dana 19. 
The alumni members present include 1 
the following: '71— W. H. Bowker, 
L. B. Caswell, E. E. Thompson ; *7"» 
—Dr. Madifton Bunker, J. F. Win- 
chester; '81— E D. Howe; *82— N 
N. Jones ; *82-TJames S. Williams ; 
•83— C. W. Minott, H. J. Wheeler; 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Tuesday, Feb. 9, 1915. 



>h6— C. W. Clapp, R. B.Mackintosh; 
•87— C. L. Marshall, E. F. Richard- 
son ; '88— H. ('.Bliss, Thomas Rice; 
'«9 — G. W. Algier, Isaac Alger, Jr., 
F. W. Davis, Dr. M. D. North, R. 
P. Sellew ; '90— F. L. Taylor ; '91— 
F. L. Arnold ; '92— E. T. Clark, H. 
K. Crane, H. B. Emerson, G. B. 
Willard ; *98— H. J. Harlow, John 
E. Perry, F. A. Smith ; '94— John 

E. Gifford, Lowell Manley, L. M. 
Barker; '95— A. F. Burgess; "J6— 

F. H. Read, Newton Shultis ; '97— 
C. A. Peters ; *99— A. A, Boutelle, 
H. W. Dana; '00— R. D